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  • June 27, 2011
  • 06:40 PM
  • 1,219 views

More about t-citings

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Several months ago I blogged about Priem & Costello's t-citings paper "How and why scholars cite on Twitter". Now Weller, Dröge & Puschmann have done further research about the subject, by analyzing tweets from two major scientific conferences.They collected tweets from the World Wide Web conference 2010 (WWW2010, #www2010) and the Modern Language Association Conference 2009 (MLA09, #mla09), starting two weeks before each conference and ending two weeks after.WWW2010 Vs. MLA09The authors considered tweets with links to websites as external citations. URLs were classified into the following categories:Blog: Blog posts/commentaries in personal websitesConference: Official conference websitedError: Bad URLMedia: Photos, videos, graphics, etc.Press: non-scientific publications from newspapers, journals, etc.Project: Official websites of research groups, scientific projects or project resultsPublication: Scholarly publicationsSlides: Presentation slidesTwitter: In-Twitter links or Twitter-related sitesOther: Everything that didn't fit into the categories above.Almost 40% (39.85%) of the WWW2010 tweets included URLs, and more than a quarter (27.22%) of the MLA09 tweets had URLs. Tweets classified into categories: Participants of MLA09 preferred linking to blogs and press articles, while the WWW2010 participants preferred various media items and blogs. The WWW2010 number of links to presentations and publications was much higher than the number of those in MLA09, which had zero slides linked and only 3 unique publication URLs.Retweets: Bora Z wins the WWW!Counting retweets can be problematic, since they don't always start with RT @user. The authors had to manually classify tweets to locate the retweets. In both conferences the top retwitteres weren't retweeted often themselves. Top retweets usually include URLs:While this work is interesting, it's definitely preliminary. The authors promise to analyze citation patterns over time, study differences between disciplines and more in the future. I hope we'll see more research about those subjects soon.Weller, K., Dröge, E., & Puschmann, C. (2011). citation analysis on twitter MSM2011... Read more »

Weller, K., Dröge, E., & Puschmann, C. (2011) citation analysis on twitter. MSM2011 - 1st Workshop on making sense of Microposts, 1-12. info:/

  • June 27, 2011
  • 05:33 PM
  • 1,298 views

Lemaître: Lost in Translation

by sarah in One Small Step

The name of Edwin Hubble is ubiquitous in modern astronomy. Telescopes, constants, laws, galaxy classification schemes are named after the famed astronomer, considered to be the godfather of modern astronomy. If he were alive today, he would have appeared on The Simpsons, Southpark and Saturday Night Live. But a number of recent papers posted to [...]... Read more »

Hubble E. (1929) A RELATION BETWEEN DISTANCE AND RADIAL VELOCITY AMONG EXTRA-GALACTIC NEBULAE. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 15(3), 168-73. PMID: 16577160  

Georges Lemaître. (1931) Expansion of the universe, A homogeneous universe of constant mass and increasing radius accounting for the radial velocity of extra-galactic nebulae. MNRAS, 483-490. info:/

Sidney van den Bergh. (2011) The Curious Case of Lemaitre's Equation No. 24. arxiv. arXiv: 1106.1195v1

David L. Block. (2011) A Hubble Eclipse: Lemaitre and Censorship. arxiv. arXiv: 1106.3928v1

  • June 27, 2011
  • 06:00 AM
  • 1,441 views

Article review: Carnegie's vision for medical education

by Michelle Lin in Academic Life In Emergency Medicine

In 2010, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching published recommendations for the future reform of medical education. This same Carnegie Foundation had also commissioned and published the landmark 1910 Flexner report on medical education, exactly 100 hears prior.Here is a summary of the four major recommendations:1. Standardization and individualizationCompetency-based education is the future. Students enter medical school with a diverse background of knowledge and experiences. The focus should be towards achieving goals within the competency framework, rather than finishing four set years of medical school. Once you achieve each competency, you can move on. For instance, why does a medical student with a PhD in Statistics have to enroll in the mandatory first-year course on "Introduction to Statistics"? That person should just be able to "test out" and spend that time learning more about anatomy, for instance. Curricula should be individualized and tailored to the learner. The same case could be made for residency education, as well.2. IntegrationClinical medicine needs to be part of medical school education from day 1, instead of just the second-half of medical school. It also needs to be integrated with the basic and social sciences. Innovative programs include longitudinal integrated clerkships which do away with the traditional block rotations and instead have students follow a set group of patients over the year. A few schools actually start with clinical education and then incorporate basic science courses later.3. Habits of inquiry and improvementLearning doesn't stop after you graduate from medical school and residency. Learners should be encouraged to constantly ask questions, learn, and innovate.4. Identity formationLearners should be encouraged to take responsibility as a physician with high standards for knowledge, skill, and professionalism. This can be done through various rituals (eg. white coat ceremony), self-reflection, mentoring, and feedback. Occasionally, unprofessional behavior by medical providers occurs in reality and undermines this mission. It is critical that the medical community maintain a culture of respect, collaboration, and professionalism because impressionable eyes are watching.ReferenceIrby D. Educating physicians for the future: Carnegie's calls for reform. Medical teacher. 2011, 33(7), 547-50. PMID: 21696280.... Read more »

  • June 26, 2011
  • 09:56 AM
  • 1,367 views

Choosing a Graduate Program and Advisor

by bug_girl in Bug Girl's Blog

While data are incomplete, estimates put the number of people who enter graduate school, but don’t complete a degree, around 44%. Let’s ponder that for a moment. Nearly half of students admitted to PhD programs, some of the smartest and most motivated folks on the planet, will leave their program without a PhD. Not a lot [...]... Read more »

  • June 24, 2011
  • 11:46 AM
  • 1,726 views

Subgenus Megapomys: Biogeography and the authors’ concluding remarks

by nath in Imprints of Philippine Science

Where are the Megapomys?... Read more »

  • June 24, 2011
  • 11:15 AM
  • 554 views

Subgenus Megapomys: Biogeography and the authors’ concluding remarks

by nath in Imprints of Philippine Science

The genus Apomys (Philippine forest mice) is proposed to be divided into two subgenera: Apomys and Megapomys based on the findings of the Heaney expedition [1]. Megapomys includes A. abrae, A. datae, A. gracilirostris, A.sacobianus, A. aurorae, A. banahao, A. brownorum, A. magnus, A minganensis, A. sierrae, and A. zambalensis. See previous post. The discovery isn’t serendipitous.  The authors used predictive biogeographic models that are [...]... Read more »

  • June 21, 2011
  • 04:44 PM
  • 1,499 views

More magic numbers

by nuclear.kelly in Miss Atomic Bomb

I was alerted to some interesting work by a recent report in the IoP's Physics World magazine. Researchers have finally worked out that there is, in fact, a correlation between group size and quality of research.The paper (available on arxiv and published in Scientometrics, which is apparently the research of... research) took information from a survey of UK universities (and a few French) and determined the "quality vs quantity" of the research output (the "quality" metric is described in more detail in the paper, but it is essentially the same metric used to determine how much federal funding the researcher gets). This was parameterized (fit mathematically) via a complex system model and something unusual popped out: the model predicted so-called "magic numbers" - at which a research group gets the best return on investment, so to speak. Above this magic number, or critical mass (if you prefer), the group begins to fragment, as is demonstrated in Figure 2 of the paper:A table of all of the different scientific research areas and the model's predicted "magic number" for that subject is shown below:Pure mathematics has the lowest magic number (less than 2, a traditionally "every man for himself" kind of field), and one sub-branch of computer science the largest (almost 25, with "business and management" a close second at 24).Everyone knows anecdotally that, though a trend doesn't necessarily indicate ubiquity, it is true that at a certain point, when a group gets too large, not everyone in the group will be carrying weight and the quality of the research done (per person) goes down. It's fascinating to see this generalization plotted and put to a statistical analysis. As one of the study's authors remarked, he would consider using these results in putting together a research department from scratch. And, of course, I'd say our group (my last paper had 15 coauthors) is just the right size.Reference:Kenna, R., & Berche, B. (2010). Critical mass and the dependency of research quality on group size Scientometrics, 86 (2), 527-540 DOI: 10.1007/s11192-010-0282-9... Read more »

  • June 21, 2011
  • 12:29 PM
  • 306 views

Research Practices on the Web in the Field of Technology Enhanced Learning

by Peter Kraker in Science and the Web

Last week, I attended Websci’11, the 3rd International Conference on Web Science. It was a great experience to engage with such a diverse crowd; there were people from computer science, information science, social science, psychology, philosophy (and some others that I probably missed here) representing many different aspects from this multi-disciplinary field. I am still …Read More... Read more »

Kraker, P., & Lindstaedt, S. (2011) Research Practices on the Web in the Field of Technology Enhanced Learning. Proceedings of the ACM WebSci'11. info:/

  • June 20, 2011
  • 05:55 PM
  • 1,660 views

Peer Reviewed Monday – Scaffolding Evaluation Skills

by Anne-Marie Deitering in info-fetishist

So this week we’re also behind a paywall, I think.  Someday I will have time to actually go looking for Peer Reviewed Monday articles that meet a set of standards, but right now we’re still in the “something I read in real life this week” phase. And this one was interesting – so far, when [...]... Read more »

Nicolaidou, I., Kyza, E., Terzian, F., Hadjichambis, A., & Kafouris, D. (2011) A framework for scaffolding students' assessment of the credibility of evidence. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. DOI: 10.1002/tea.20420  

  • June 20, 2011
  • 06:00 AM
  • 1,235 views

Article review: Professionalism in the ED through the eyes of medical students

by Michelle Lin in Academic Life In Emergency Medicine

Teaching professionalism in a formal curriculum is so much different than demonstrating professionalism in the Emergency Department. So much of what students and residents learn about professionalism are from observed behaviors of the attending physicians -- that is, the hidden curriculum.In a qualitative study assessing medical student reflection essays during an EM clerkship, the authors (my friends Dr. Sally Santen and Dr. Robin Hemphill) found some startling results. The instructions to the medical students were to “think about an aspect of professionalism that has troubled you this month. Write a minimum of one half-page reflection describing what was concerning and how you might handle it.”Results:61 of 150 reflection essays discussed professionalism themes.Using a grounded theory approach, the authors first looked at the data and then created categorical themes. Analytic Domains1. Demonstration of positive professional behaviorDemonstration of compassion and empathyTension between respecting diversity and respecting other core valuesBalance between patient-centered care and effective care Commitment to ethical principles2. Observation of unprofessional behavior Lack of compassion Not telling the truth Lack of teamwork Inappropriate medical care3. Personal improvement and learningWhether to speak up because they are subordinate in a hierarchy Plans for their own future personal professional behavior through reflection on observed professional and unprofessional behavior and their own behaviorThe take-home point is that unprofessional behavior definitely occurs in the ED to varying degrees, and medical students are astute at identifying these. There were examples of lack of compassion, struggles in prescribing opiates to apparently drug-seeking patients, and not telling patients the truth.As residents and faculty, we must maintain an open-mind and set high standards for professionalism. Even if you aren't being called out on it, learners are noticing. They just might not be vocalizing their concerns because of their role as "subordinates" in a hierarchy who depend on evaluations to secure a good grade on their rotation.Especially with young, impressionable new medical students and interns in the ED soon to start in the new academic year, remember to lead by example.Reference Santen SA, Hemphill RR. A Window on Professionalism in the Emergency Department Through Medical Student Narratives. Annals of emergency medicine. 2011 - in early press. PMID: 21624702.... Read more »

  • June 19, 2011
  • 07:14 PM
  • 505 views

How to get a village named after your company? – A curious case of ‘Snapdeal.com’ Nagar

by Kandarp Mehta in Creatologue - Exploring Creativity

It was in news yesterday that a village in India named Shivnagar, changed it’s name to ‘Snapdeal.com’-Nagar. When I read the headline, my reaction was, ‘What? How much would they have paid to sponsor the entire village? For how long?’ … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • June 19, 2011
  • 08:08 AM
  • 1,436 views

Sunday at the Lab with Uri Alon

by Duncan Hull in O'Really?

Ah Sunday, a day of rest, recuperation and roasted food… Unless you’re a scientist, that is. This one goes out to all the committed high-calibre, driven individual scientists [1] who are spending this Sunday working at the bench. This amusing little ditty is written by systems biologists  Michael Elowitz and Uri Alon (lyrics below), and performed here by Uri [...]... Read more »

  • June 19, 2011
  • 01:42 AM
  • 1,208 views

Imaging Sciences Pathway Retreat - A Conference Covered

by Paige Brown in From The Lab Bench

Coverage of a recent conference on Medical Imaging in St. Louis. Not only are we increasingly being able to image the intricate inner workings of the human body, but we are beginning also to use medical imaging as a tool to monitor disease treatment and even to design and implement new drugs in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. ... Read more »

Tsien RY. (2003) Imagining imaging's future. Nature reviews. Molecular cell biology. PMID: 14587522  

  • June 17, 2011
  • 05:03 PM
  • 1,028 views

Where does your empathy come from?

by eHarmony Labs in eHarmony Labs Blog

Do you ever get to the point where you feel as though you and your partner have absolutely nothing in common? Read further to find out the one common thread that lies in almost all of us. ... Read more »

Ramachandran, V. S. . (2001) Synaesthesia - a window into perception, thought and language. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 3-34. info:/

  • June 15, 2011
  • 03:31 AM
  • 970 views

The blind men and the elephant – open science version

by Daniel Mietchen in Research Cycle Research

But what if these elephant researchers would have kept open notebooks, uploaded their data to public repositories, and all that with version control and comprehensive tagging? Continue reading →... Read more »

  • June 13, 2011
  • 10:51 PM
  • 850 views

Article review: Inconvenient truths about effective teaching

by Michelle Lin in Academic Life In Emergency Medicine

At the CDEM meeting during the SAEM national meeting this past week, the keynote speaker (Dr. Charles Hatem from Harvard) mentioned a great editorial article called "Inconvenient Truths About Effective Clinical Teaching."Here's a summary of the opinion article from Lancet:Clinician-educators are increasingly pressured to do more with less time and support (i.e. release from clinical responsibilities). Learners are the victims of this calculated move.The author talks about 8 habits to emulate as an educator, in the setting of these changing times. This is especially helpful to review as we are about to start a new academic year with fresh interns and medical students in the Emergency Department.1. Think out loud.This lets learners understand our thought-processes as we apply population-based research to our individual patient. This translational process is often ambiguous with lots of gray areas. Understanding our clinical reasoning process, rather than just the end result of ordering particular tests or treatments, is an invaluable lesson for learners."If our profession is serious about lifelong learning, we must recognise that learning can’t happen without humility. Teachers who humbly think out loud help to show the way."2. Activate the learner."Experts agree that adult education is a tango: it takes two. The dance will fail, no matter how expert the teacher, if the learner is not actively, even passionately, engaged."The most effective teachers use the democratic style, where learners are encouraged to think and act autonomously in real-time. The trick is to "activate" learner initiative while "protecting them from themselves" to avoid errors. With time pressures, it's easy to fall back to an autocratic approach (do what the teacher says). It's a constant struggle to employ a democratic style of teaching. In reality in the ED, we teach using a hybrid approach - sometimes autocratic, sometimes democratic.3. Listen smart.Great patient care is all about taking a good history. Similarly, great clinical teaching is all about listening to the learner. What's his/her knowledge base, how is his/her clinical reasoning skills, and does s/he see the big picture?Assessing a learner's presentations and discussions often requires that you (as the educator) independently talk to the patients to ensure that the facts are correct.4. Keep it simple.Learners are constantly learning and processing various information when working clinically.  Boiling down complex medical issues to a few simple teaching points can be difficult for the educator, but it is most effective for the learner. Also, I find that you don't have to unload all of your knowledge on the learner. Pick 1-2 concise teaching points targeted to the level of the learner and focus on them.  5. Wear gloves.This is critical. Put on gloves and go to the patient's bedside. Having a learner see your approach to bedside care, empathy, and communication are invaluable. We often take for granted the art of patient care and we can best teach it by demonstrating to others.6. Adapt enthusiastically.Things rarely go exactly as planned on a shift. Instead of fearing surprises, use these unexpected occurrences (eg. patient clinical deterioriation, medication side effect) as teaching opportunities.7. Link learning to caring.Teach about empathy and professionalism. Patient care involves actually caring about the individual patient. Patients are more than just about their disease. "Understand the patient's illness as well as their disease." 8. Kindle kindness.Patients can sense genuine kindness and caring. Be a role model in how you talk with patients. There is a difference between indifferent politeness and genuine kindness.Learners are more receptive to feedback when spoken with kindness, no matter how critical your comments are. For me, I picture myself as a coach in (rather than an evaluator of) their lifelong learning process, and frame their feedback accordingly. ReferenceReilly BM. Inconvenient truths about effective clinical teaching. Lancet. 2007; 370(9588): 705-11. PMID: 17720022.... Read more »

  • June 13, 2011
  • 10:51 PM
  • 735 views

Article review: Inconvenient truths about effective teaching

by Michelle Lin in Academic Life In Emergency Medicine

At the CDEM meeting during the SAEM national meeting this past week, the keynote speaker (Dr. Charles Hatem from Harvard) mentioned a great editorial article called "Inconvenient Truths About Effective Clinical Teaching."Here's a summary of the opinion article from Lancet:Clinician-educators are increasingly pressured to do more with less time and support (i.e. release from clinical responsibilities). Learners are the victims of this calculated move.The author talks about 8 habits to emulate as an educator, in the setting of these changing times. This is especially helpful to review as we are about to start a new academic year with fresh interns and medical students in the Emergency Department.1. Think out loud.This lets learners understand our thought-processes as we apply population-based research to our individual patient. This translational process is often ambiguous with lots of gray areas. Understanding our clinical reasoning process, rather than just the end result of ordering particular tests or treatments, is an invaluable lesson for learners."If our profession is serious about lifelong learning, we must recognise that learning can’t happen without humility. Teachers who humbly think out loud help to show the way."2. Activate the learner."Experts agree that adult education is a tango: it takes two. The dance will fail, no matter how expert the teacher, if the learner is not actively, even passionately, engaged."The most effective teachers use the democratic style, where learners are encouraged to think and act autonomously in real-time. The trick is to "activate" learner initiative while "protecting them from themselves" to avoid errors. With time pressures, it's easy to fall back to an autocratic approach (do what the teacher says). It's a constant struggle to employ a democratic style of teaching. In reality in the ED, we teach using a hybrid approach - sometimes autocratic, sometimes democratic.3. Listen smart.Great patient care is all about taking a good history. Similarly, great clinical teaching is all about listening to the learner. What's his/her knowledge base, how is his/her clinical reasoning skills, and does s/he see the big picture?Assessing a learner's presentations and discussions often requires that you (as the educator) independently talk to the patients to ensure that the facts are correct.4. Keep it simple.Learners are constantly learning and processing various information when working clinically.  Boiling down complex medical issues to a few simple teaching points can be difficult for the educator, but it is most effective for the learner. Also, I find that you don't have to unload all of your knowledge on the learner. Pick 1-2 concise teaching points targeted to the level of the learner and focus on them.  5. Wear gloves.This is critical. Put on gloves and go to the patient's bedside. Having a learner see your approach to bedside care, empathy, and communication are invaluable. We often take for granted the art of patient care and we can best teach it by demonstrating to others.6. Adapt enthusiastically.Things rarely go exactly as planned on a shift. Instead of fearing surprises, use these unexpected occurrences (eg. patient clinical deterioriation, medication side effect) as teaching opportunities.7. Link learning to caring.Teach about empathy and professionalism. Patient care involves actually caring about the individual patient. Patients are more than just about their disease. "Understand the patient's illness as well as their disease." 8. Kindle kindness.Patients can sense genuine kindness and caring. Be a role model in how you talk with patients. There is a difference between indifferent politeness and genuine kindness.Learners are more receptive to feedback when spoken with kindness, no matter how critical your comments are. For me, I picture myself as a coach in (rather than an evaluator of) their lifelong learning process, and frame their feedback accordingly. ReferenceReilly BM. Inconvenient truths about effective clinical teaching. Lancet. 2007; 370(9588): 705-11. PMID: 17720022.... Read more »

  • June 13, 2011
  • 03:02 PM
  • 779 views

Peer Reviewed Monday – Expertise Reversal Theory

by Anne-Marie Deitering in info-fetishist

Okay. So I am pretty sure that the actual article I am pointing to here (probably behind a pay wall – sorry) is not peer-reviewed.  It is the editors’ introduction to a special issue of the journal Instructional Science.  In this introduction they tell us that there are five empirical research reports and two commentary [...]... Read more »

  • June 11, 2011
  • 09:24 AM
  • 740 views

R.I.P. Toshisada Nishida.

by seriousmonkeybusiness in This is Serious Monkey Business

On June 7th, 2011, one of the world's pioneering primatologists, Toshisada Nishida, passed away at age 70. A look back at his career and his accomplishments.... Read more »

  • June 10, 2011
  • 03:00 PM
  • 1,100 views

Too Many Laws

by Paul Statt in Paul Statt Communications

Research on health effects of distracted driving laws demonstrates that George Soros is right: " thinking has a manipulative function as well as a cognitive one"... Read more »

Ibrahim, J., Anderson, E., Burris, S., & Wagenaar, A. (2011) State Laws Restricting Driver Use of Mobile Communications Devices. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 40(6), 659-665. DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2011.02.024  

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