Post List

Other posts

(Modify Search »)

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,855 views

GPCR crystallization detergent space increased by 25%

by Peter Nollert in Emerald BioStructures Blog

The choice of detergents for GPCRs has just been increased by 25% with the introduction of MNGs - maltose neopentyl glycol amphiphiles. The agonist bound structure of the beta adrenergic receptor from crystals using this new detergent is announced in a recent paper.... Read more »

Newstead, S., Ferrandon, S., & Iwata, S. (2008) Rationalizing α-helical membrane protein crystallization. Protein Science, 17(3), 466-472. DOI: 10.1110/ps.073263108  

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,401 views

increasing women in neuroscience

by Ragamuffin in How We Are Hungry

The Department Chair Training to Increase Women in Neuroscience (IWiN) is scheduled to meetin in Tucson, at the University of Arizona this April. The workshop, funded by the National Science Foundation's ADVANCE program, is a three-year program aiming to increase the number of women on neurosciences faculty. The participants of these workshops expect to leave them with tools to implement recruitment and advancement plans for women within their universities, and to disseminate the informat........ Read more »

Mary Ann Mason, Marc Goulden, Karie Frasch. (2010) Keeping Women in the Science Pipeline. Focus on Workplace Flexibility. info:/

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,740 views

STSE Education Research

by Jack Hassard in The Art of Teaching Science

Review of research on Science, Technology, Society, Environmental Education research... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,350 views

Chasing Earthquakes

by Tara Tai in Student Voices

A survey on earthquakes and their effects on causing future quakes.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,672 views

Chasing Earthquakes

by Tara Tai in Student Voices

How earthquakes trigger future quakes.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,795 views

Simpler LCP-based crystallization

by Peter Nollert in Protein Crystallization Blog

For all those that are interested in simplifying membrane protein crystallization trials, you may want to check out this paper on the topic of 'simplifying LCP-based crystallization':

Wallace E, Dranow D, Laible PD, Christensen J, & Nollert P (2011). Monoolein lipid phases as incorporation and enrichment materials for membrane protein crystallization. PloS one, 6 (8) PMID: 21909395... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,882 views

Communication as a network problem

by Becky in It Takes 30

I recently gave a short talk to a group of post-docs who had organized their own mini-symposium and workshop as a way of bringing the Harvard post-doc community in systems biology together. Those of you who haven’t worked in the Boston area may be surprised that we need special events to bring together a community that is separated by only ~4 miles, but in fact the trip from Harvard’s main campus in Cambridge to Harvard Medical School in Boston is a frustrating and lengthy one. Mu........ Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,496 views

Dizziness When Standing Up Linked to Greater Risk of Heart Failure: Research

by United Academics in United Academics

Many people feel suddenly dizzy when they stand up too quickly. This is caused by orthostatic hypotension, a rapid drop in blood pressure. Now a team of scientists at the University of North Carolina suggest that people with orthostatic hypotension might have a greater risk of developing heart failure.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,820 views

Your Good Side Is the Left Side, According to Science

by United Academics in United Academics

Don’t give it any more thought: according to scientists, left side of the face usually looks better, mainly because it’s more expressive than the right side. Researchers at the Wake Forest University showed a series of photographs to 37 people, some of them mirror-reversed, so the viewers wouldn’t know which side they were looking at. In most cases, they chose the left side no matter where it was in the picture.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,085 views

Tuna Have Brought Fukushima Radiation to US

by United Academics in United Academics

Just five months after the Fukushima nuclear disaster, scientists have found bluefin tuna off the Californian coast contaminated with radioactive materials that leaked from the Japanese nuclear plant across the Pacific, almost 10,000 kilometers away. For the first time, a study shows that a huge micrating fish is able to carry radioactivity over such a distance.... Read more »

Buesseler, K., Jayne, S., Fisher, N., Rypina, I., Baumann, H., Baumann, Z., Breier, C., Douglass, E., George, J., Macdonald, A.... (2012) Fukushima-derived radionuclides in the ocean and biota off Japan. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109(16), 5984-5988. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1120794109  

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,917 views

“Beware of Exercise” is a Sexy Headline

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

A new study that raised concerns about exercise should instead raise concerns about obesity.... Read more »

Claude Bouchard, Steven Blair, Timothy Church, Conrad Earnest, James Hagberg, Keijo Häkkinen, Nathan Jenkins, Laura Karavirta, William Kraus, Arthur Leon.... (2012) Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?. PLOS One, 7(5). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,842 views

“Beware of Exercise” is a Sexy Headline

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

A new study that raised concerns about exercise should instead raise concerns about obesity.... Read more »

Claude Bouchard, Steven Blair, Timothy Church, Conrad Earnest, James Hagberg, Keijo Häkkinen, Nathan Jenkins, Laura Karavirta, William Kraus, Arthur Leon.... (2012) Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?. PLOS One, 7(5). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,214 views

Evidence that financial analysis is biased

by Adriana Wilner in Academic Radar

According to a recent study, investment analysts in US were less optimistic in their recommendations after the banks they work for were sanctioned. However, clients did not gain anything with that change.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,890 views

Casual Sex: Revisited

by Annemarie van Oosten in United Academics

In my first blog article (“Casual sex: not so casual?”) I wrote about how casual sex (i.e., a sexual interaction between two individuals outside of a long-term committed relationship) is often seen by young adults as a means of starting a relationship. However, things seem to be a bit more complicated (as is often the case with the topic of sexuality), especially for young higher educated women. According to an article by Hamilton and Armstrong (2009), many girls in their early twent........ Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,045 views

Do Women Want Nice Guys?

by Annemarie van Oosten in United Academics

It’s a familiar story: women who say they are looking to date a kind, sensitive and emotionally expressive guy often end up dating a macho man or a jerk. This leaves many ‘nice guys’ feeling they always finish last. For many decades, researchers have tried to get a grip on this so called ‘nice guy paradox’.... Read more »

Urbaniak, G.C., . (2003) Physical Attractiveness and the “Nice Guy Paradox”: Do Nice Guys Really Finish Last? . Sex Roles, 413-426. info:/

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,782 views

Stress Leaves Its Mark on Dad’s Sperm

by Anouk Vleugels in United Academics

For the first time, researchers have found that stress can leave an epigenetic mark on sperm, which then alters the offspring’s hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a part of the brain that deals with responding to stress. The study was published in the Journal of Neuroscience.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,111 views

Bubbles and Bite: Why Fizzy Drinks Taste So Good

by Dyani Lewis in United Academics

Why do we choose to drink the beverages that we do? When we reach for a cup of coffee, perhaps it’s the caffeine we’re after; in a glass of wine, the social lubricating effects of alcohol may have lured us. But for carbonated drinks, the subtle zing of effervescence often combined with sugary sweetness, creates a sensory delight that can be irresistible.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,214 views

Could we use scents to improve our health?

by Elisabeth Buhl Thubron in United Academics

A new study suggests hidden odours can control our food choices.... Read more »

Gaillet-Torrent, M., Sulmont-Rossé, C., Issanchou, S., Chabanet, C., & Chambaron, S. (2014) Impact of a non-attentively perceived odour on subsequent food choices. Appetite, 17-22. DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2014.01.009  

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,869 views

How sex-engineered prawns can be used to fight deadly parasite

by This Science is Crazy! in This Science Is Crazy!

Scientists float the idea of introducing male-only prawn stocks to Senegal river to control spread of snails which act as vector for blood flukes... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,354 views

Interlukin 32 biomarker which predict relapse of mycobacterium tuberculosis

by B V Waghmare in HIV virus and antiretroviral drugs and antiAIDS vaccine research and developmets

Interlukin 32 a protien which is found in people which do test positie for mycobacterium tuberculosis infection but do not develop pulmonary disease, it is found that interlukin is important in killing micobacterium, thereby protect them from TB disease, this interleukin 32 can be used therapeutically in patients suffering with TB along with chemotherapy, which will enhance efficacy of anti tuberculosis chemo therapy... Read more »

B V Waghmare. (2014) Interlukin 32 biomarker that will predict relapse of tuberculosis infection and will be used in treatment of TB. http://www.medicalwebsite.org/2014/09/protein-that-protect-from-tb-infection.html. info:/

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SRI Technology.

To learn more, visit http://selfregulationinstitute.org/.