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  • May 19, 2015
  • 07:00 AM
  • 412 views

Rap Revolution: The Musical Evolution

by Gunnar de Winter in United Academics

After soul, rock, and disco, rap is the biggest musical change of the past 50 years.
... Read more »

Mauch, M., MacCallum, R., Levy, M., & Leroi, A. (2015) The evolution of popular music: USA 1960-2010. Royal Society Open Science, 2(5), 150081-150081. DOI: 10.1098/rsos.150081  

  • May 16, 2015
  • 01:22 PM
  • 598 views

The relationship between CEO greed and company performance

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

That gut feeling many workers, laborers and other underlings have about their CEOs is spot on, according to three recent studies which all suggest that CEO greed is bad for business.But how do you define greed? Are compassionate CEOs better for business? How do you know if the leader is doing more harm than good? And can anybody rein in the I-Me-Mine type leader anyway?... Read more »

  • May 15, 2015
  • 04:02 PM
  • 350 views

The Dependency Ratio in Human Evolution

by Andrew White in AndyWhiteAnthropology

As far as I know, humans are unique among animals in having an extended period between weaning and being able to subsist on their own.  We call this “childhood.”  The long period of post-weaning dependence provides our large brains with a lot of time to mature.  It also requires a lot of parental investment (in terms of time, energy, calories, etc.) and means that we would have to wait a long time between offspring if each one had to independent before the mother could have an [...] ... Read more »

  • May 15, 2015
  • 11:36 AM
  • 410 views

Which Baby Animals Look Cute? It May Be No Accident

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Sure, there are faces only a mother could love. And then there are faces no mother loves, because they belong to animals that fend for themselves from birth. The babies we find cutest—no matter what species they are—may have evolved to look that way because they need a parent's attention. That means even a crocodile can tug on our heartstrings.

Konrad Lorenz, an Austrian zoologist, proposed in the mid-20th century that human infants are cute for a reason. He said evolution has created ado... Read more »

  • May 14, 2015
  • 12:16 PM
  • 410 views

Death and Landscapes: Why Does Location Matter?

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

This week, I’m attending the Cultural Landscapes and Heritage Values conference at UMass Amherst. I am going to be speaking Thursday at the 8-10 am session, “Universities as Examples of […]... Read more »

Howard M. R. Williams. (1997) Ancient Landscapes and the dead: the reuse of prehistoric and Roman monuments as early Anglo-Saxon burial sites. Medieval Archaeology, 1-31. info:/

Lynne Goldstein. (1995) Landscapes and Mortuary Practices. Regional Approaches to Mortuary Analysis Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology, 101-121. DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4899-1310-4_5  

  • May 13, 2015
  • 12:01 AM
  • 425 views

“Naughty boys” trying to learn

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Teacher expectations can constitute a self-fulfilling prophecy: teachers behave differently towards children depending on their expectations of them. The ways in which teachers treat students affect students’ self-concept, motivation, achievement and aspirations. Over time, the performance of high-expectation students will … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • May 6, 2015
  • 10:24 AM
  • 446 views

Human Remains on Display in Prehispanic Northwest Mexico

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

Human remains are powerful statements. They can be a symbol of violence, veneration, respect, disrespect, memory, or art. As archaeologists, we need to be careful about the ways that we […]... Read more »

  • May 4, 2015
  • 06:00 AM
  • 284 views

‘Megafloods’ Spurred Collapse of Ancient City of Cahokia, New Study Finds

by Blake de Pastino in Western Digs

It’s been attributed to war, crop failures, political strife, and even an epic fire. But new research in the heart of one of North America’s most influential prehistoric cultures suggests that its demise may have been brought about, at least in part, by disastrous “megafloods.”
... Read more »

Munoz SE, Gruley KE, Massie A, Fike DA, Schroeder S, & Williams JW. (2015) Cahokia's emergence and decline coincided with shifts of flood frequency on the Mississippi River. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 25941363  

  • May 4, 2015
  • 06:00 AM
  • 268 views

‘Megafloods’ Spurred Collapse of Ancient City of Cahokia, New Study Finds

by Blake de Pastino in Western Digs

It’s been attributed to war, crop failures, political strife, and even an epic fire. But new research in the heart of one of North America’s most influential prehistoric cultures suggests that its demise may have been brought about, at least in part, by disastrous “megafloods.”
... Read more »

Munoz SE, Gruley KE, Massie A, Fike DA, Schroeder S, & Williams JW. (2015) Cahokia's emergence and decline coincided with shifts of flood frequency on the Mississippi River. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 25941363  

  • May 3, 2015
  • 01:13 AM
  • 356 views

Australopithecine Sexual Dimorphism: What's Love Got to Do With It?

by Andrew White in AndyWhiteAnthropology

How much sexual dimorphism is there among Australopithecines, and what does it tell us about sexual selection?... Read more »

  • April 29, 2015
  • 10:38 AM
  • 518 views

Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling: Decapitation in Medieval Ireland

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

Beheading was a popular mode of execution throughout human history- it is dramatic, final and is often part of a public display of power by the victors over the soon […]... Read more »

  • April 27, 2015
  • 02:03 PM
  • 432 views

Google searches for ‘n-word’ associated with black mortality

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Google searches could unveil patterns in Black mortality rates across the US, according to a new study. Researchers found that those areas with greater levels of racism, as indexed by the proportion of Google searches containing the “n-word,” had higher mortality rates among Blacks. The study is the first to examine an Internet query-based measure of racism in relation to mortality risk.... Read more »

Chae, D., Clouston, S., Hatzenbuehler, M., Kramer, M., Cooper, H., Wilson, S., Stephens-Davidowitz, S., Gold, R., & Link, B. (2015) Association between an Internet-Based Measure of Area Racism and Black Mortality. PLOS ONE, 10(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0122963  

  • April 24, 2015
  • 11:29 AM
  • 458 views

Classic Story, A City Corpse Meets a Country Corpse

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

I’ve been indulging in a little HGTV this week as a way to recover from post-conference exhaustion. I know that shows like House Hunters aren’t real- they already have bought […]... Read more »

  • April 14, 2015
  • 09:06 PM
  • 477 views

‘Investing in language:’ Why do we think about language education the way we do?

by Agnes Bodis in Language on the Move

If someone cannot now learn their native language, adding a couple of foerign (sic) dead languages is not going to help them. And there is no possible economic return such as is available from Asian languages or living European languages … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • April 8, 2015
  • 08:58 AM
  • 464 views

New Morbid Terminology: Corpse Medicine

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

Earlier this week, researchers at Nottingham University were able to recreate a 9th c Anglo-Saxon medical remedy using garlic, onion and part of a cow’s stomach. When I first heard […]... Read more »

Karen Gordon-Grube. (1993) Evidence of Medicinal Cannibalism in Puritan New England: "Mummy" and Related Remedies in Edward Taylor's "Dispensatory". Early American Literature, 28(3), 185-221. info:/

  • April 7, 2015
  • 11:52 PM
  • 509 views

Children of the harvest: schooling, class and race

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

I’ve just come across a fascinating article about the schooling of migrant children during the Great Depression era in the US West Coast states. The authors, Paul Theobald and Rubén Donato, tell a fascinating tale of the manipulation of schooling … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • April 2, 2015
  • 06:00 AM
  • 308 views

Over 1,000 Ancient Stone Tools, Left by Great Basin Hunters, Found in Utah Desert

by Blake de Pastino in Western Digs

An array of stone tools discovered in northern Utah — including the largest instrument of its kind ever recorded — may change what we know about the ancient inhabitants of the Great Basin, archaeologists say.
... Read more »

  • April 1, 2015
  • 08:23 AM
  • 395 views

From the Archives: Approaching Ethnicity in Archaeology

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

Today in my ANP 203: Introduction to Archaeology class, we are talking about ethnicity vs ancestry, so I thought it would be a good time to repost this article on […]... Read more »

Hakenbeck, Susanne. (2011) Roman or barbarian? Shifting identities in early medieval cemeteries in bavaria. Post - Classical Archaeologies. info:other/

Halsall, Guy. (2011) Ethnicity and early medieval cemeteries. Arqueología y Territorio Medieval. info:/

  • April 1, 2015
  • 03:13 AM
  • 428 views

Prehistoric rock crystal extraction in the Alps

by M. Cornelissen in hazelnut relations

I have written about the most famous rock crystal find from the Swiss Alps, the Planggenstock Treasure and the use of rock crystal through the millennia before. We know where the Planggenstock Treasure and other recent finds were originally found. … Continue reading →... Read more »

Leitner, W. (2013) Steinzeitliche Gewinnung von Bergkristall am Riepenkar in den Tuxer Alpen (Tirol). Preistoria Alpina, 23-26. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 11:00 AM
  • 449 views

Human Evolution

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Evolution: How we became human. An Infographic by Yisela A. Trentini.... Read more »

W. Howard Levie, & Richard Lentz. (1982) Effects of text illustrations: A review of research. Educational Technology Research , 30(4), 195-232. info:/10.1007/BF02765184

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