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  • January 12, 2016
  • 05:15 PM
  • 168 views

Stem Cell Derived Growth Factors May Slow Progression of ALS

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Dimitrios Karussis M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Neurology Head, Multiple Sclerosis Center Hadassah BrainLabs Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Prof. Karussis: BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics is developing innovative, autologous stem cell … Continue reading →
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Prof. Dimitrios Karussis. (2016) Stem Cell Derived Growth Factors May Slow Progression of ALS. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 12, 2016
  • 03:13 PM
  • 134 views

Sugar Sweetened Beverages Linked to Increase in Belly Fat

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Caroline Fox, MD MPH National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine Harvard Medical School Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Fox: There is … Continue reading →
The post Sugar Sweetened Beverages Linked to Increase in Belly Fat appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Dr. Caroline Fox. (2016) Sugar Sweetened Beverages Linked to Increase in Belly Fat. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 12, 2016
  • 03:08 PM
  • 173 views

Improving your toddler’s memory skills has long-term benefits

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

If your toddler is a Forgetful Jones, you might want to help boost his or her brainpower sooner rather than later. New research shows that preschoolers who score lower on a memory task are likely to score higher on a dropout risk scale at the age of 12.
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  • January 12, 2016
  • 02:40 PM
  • 127 views

Mental Health May Improve For Some Patients After Bariatric Surgery

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Aaron J. Dawes, MD Fellow, VA/RWJF Clinical Scholars Program Division of Health Services Research University of California Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90024 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Dawes: We reviewed … Continue reading →
The post Mental Health May Improve For Some Patients After Bariatric Surgery appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Dr. Aaron Dawes. (2016) Mental Health May Improve For Some Patients After Bariatric Surgery. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 12, 2016
  • 02:30 PM
  • 120 views

Equations Use Routine Data To Predict Risk of Kidney Failure

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Navdeep Tangri, MD, PhD FRCPC Department of Medicine Seven Oaks General Hospital University of Manitoba Winnipeg, Canada Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Tangri: Chronic kidney disease is … Continue reading →
The post Equations Use Routine Data To Predict Risk of Kidney Failure appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Navdeep Tangri, MD, PhD FRCP. (2015) Equations Use Routine Data To Predict Risk of Kidney Failure. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 12, 2016
  • 02:23 PM
  • 119 views

Autism Spectrum Disorder: Comorbid Conditions Contribute To Early Mortality Risks

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Diana Schendel, Professor MSO Department of Public Health Institute of Epidemiology and Social Medicine and Department of Economics and Business                             National Centre for Register-based Research Aarhus University Denmark Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What … Continue reading →
The post Autism Spectrum Disorder: Comorbid Conditions Contribute To Early Mortality Risks appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Prof. Diana Schendel. (2016) Autism Spectrum Disorder: Comorbid Conditions Contribute To Early Mortality Risks. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 12, 2016
  • 02:12 PM
  • 112 views

Study Identifies PSA Level Most Likely To Predict Prostate Cancer Recurrence

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: R. Jeffrey Karnes MD Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905   MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Karnes: Cancer recurrence following radical prostatectomy is a concern for men … Continue reading →
The post Study Identifies PSA Level Most Likely To Predict Prostate Cancer Recurrence appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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R. Jeffrey Karnes MD. (2016) Study Identifies PSA Level Most Likely To Predict Prostate Cancer Recurrence. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 12, 2016
  • 02:50 AM
  • 176 views

Pregnancy paracetamol use and the 'hyperactive behavioral phenotype' of autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Prenatal use of acetaminophen was associated with an increased risk of ASD [autism spectrum disorder] accompanied by hyperkinetic symptoms..., but not with other ASD cases."I was rather interested to read that conclusion presented in the study by Zeyan Liew and colleagues [1] talking about how acetaminophen (or paracetamol as it is known here in Blighty) use during pregnancy might have some rather important connections to offspring outcomes specifically with autism and hyperkinetic symptoms in mind.Interested not only because I've discussed other research talking about how we might need to be a little more cautious about how OTC pain relief such as paracetamol is used in certain circumstances with potential offspring outcomes in mind (see here and see here) but also because it makes reference to a quite specific effect to the "hyperactive behavioral phenotype" of autism. That hyperkinetic behavioural phenotype by the way, plugs into a growing body of peer-reviewed evidence talking about the over-representation of ADHD (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder) symptoms in relation to [some] autism (see here).Liew et al "followed 64,322 children and mothers enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC; 1996–2002) for average 12.7 years to investigate whether acetaminophen use in pregnancy is associated with increased risk of ASD in the offspring." Details about paracetamol use during pregnancy were "collected prospectively from three computer-assisted telephone interviews" and offspring outcomes with labels like autism were compared. This follows a similar methodological template from some of this research team (see here).Some 1.6% of children included in the analysis were eventually diagnosed with as ASD. Roughly a third of that 1.6% of children were also diagnosed with hyperkinetic disorders (which seems to tally with other independent data analysis [2]). Perhaps unsurprisingly, paracetamol use during pregnancy was pretty widespread in the cohort (~50%) but, despite this, authors detailed something of a potentially important relationship between pregnancy paracetamol use and offspring "ASD accompanied by hyperkinetic symptoms." That there also appeared to be a relationship between length of use of paracetamol and risk of offspring autism with hyperkinetic symptoms, seems to strengthen details of a possible association.Accepting that this was a study plotting pregnancy medication use and offspring outcomes and hence findings need to be treated with a degree of caution (as with other studies on other medicines), set within the other research talking about paracetamol use during pregnancy I'm coming around the idea that more investigation is required in this area [3]. I could, once again, start talking about how pregnancy paracetamol use might link into childhood asthma symptoms [4] (albeit with some cautions attached [5]) and what that might mean for the behavioural 'associations' noted in some cases of asthma (see here) as a possible angle for future research. I would however temper such musings within the context of autism (see here); although the preliminary suggestion that prenatal exposure to certain drugs used to treat asthma might also affect risk of offspring autism is also interesting [6].I do like that Liew and colleagues talked about the idea of a specific behavioural phenotype potentially linked to pregnancy paracetamol exposure as providing a guide for more targeted investigation and perhaps to some degree bypassing the need for the sweeping generalisations about 'all autism' (we've had enough of those down the years). I believe there is quite a bit of research traction in this area with the notion of the autisms (see here) in mind.Music: Elvis Presley - If I Can Dream.----------[1] Liew Z. et al. Maternal use of acetaminophen during pregnancy and risk of autism spectrum disorders in childhood. Autism Research. 2015. Dec 21.[2] Berenguer-Forner C. et al. Comorbidity of autism spectrum disorder and attention deficit with hyperactivity. A review study. Rev Neurol. 2015 Feb 25;60 Suppl 1:S37-43.[3] de Fays L. et al. Use of paracetamol during pregnancy and child neurological development. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2015 Aug;57(8):718-24.[4] Eyers S. et al. Paracetamol in pregnancy and the risk of wheezing in offspring: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Clin Exp Allergy. 2011 Apr;41(4):482-9.[5] Cheelo M. et al. Paracetamol exposure in pregnancy and early childhood and development of childhood asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Arch Dis Child. 2015 Jan;100(1):81-9.[6] Gidaya NB. et al. In utero Exposure to β-2-Adrenergic Receptor Agonist Drugs and Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders. Pediatrics. 2016. 6 Jan.----------Liew Z, Ritz B, Virk J, & Olsen J (2015). Maternal use of acetaminophen during pregnancy and risk of autism spectrum disorders in childhood: A Danish national birth cohort study. Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism Research PMID: 26688372... Read more »

  • January 11, 2016
  • 11:07 PM
  • 96 views

Incomplete Follow Up Rates Exceed 10% in Oral Antithrombotic Trials

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Victor Serebruany, MD, PhD HeartDrug Research, Towson, Maryland Department of Neurology Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, Maryland Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Serebruany: Missing data are common challenges to the validity of … Continue reading →
The post Incomplete Follow Up Rates Exceed 10% in Oral Antithrombotic Trials appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Victor Serebruany, MD, PhD. (2016) Incomplete Follow Up Rates Exceed 10% in Oral Antithrombotic Trials. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 11, 2016
  • 10:33 PM
  • 83 views

Cost and Insurance Coverage Lacking in Physician-Patient Interactions

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Paul Barr MSc, PhD Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Clinical Practice The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice  Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Barr: I … Continue reading →
The post Cost and Insurance Coverage Lacking in Physician-Patient Interactions appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Paul Barr MSc, PhD. (2016) Cost and Insurance Coverage Lacking in Physician-Patient Interactions. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 11, 2016
  • 07:39 PM
  • 86 views

Study Finds No Evidence of Benefit from Chromium Supplements

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Peter Lay PhD Professor of Inorganic Chemistry School of Chemistry | Faculty of Science Director, Vibrational Spectroscopy Core Facility Research Portfolio The University of Sydney Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are … Continue reading →
The post Study Finds No Evidence of Benefit from Chromium Supplements appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Dr. Peter Lay. (2016) Study Finds No Evidence of Benefit from Chromium Supplements. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 11, 2016
  • 03:23 PM
  • 170 views

Stereotype means girls should expect poorer physics grades

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Imagine that you are a female student and give the exact same answer to a physics exam question as one of your male classmates, but you receive a significantly poorer grade. This is precisely what happens on a regular basis, as concluded in a study by Sarah Hofer, a researcher in the group led by ETH professor Elsbeth Stern.... Read more »

  • January 11, 2016
  • 02:29 PM
  • 87 views

Babies’ Microbiome Affected by Cesarean Section and Formula Feeding

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Annie Gatewood Hoen, PhD  Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and of Biomedical Data Science and Juliette Madan, MD, MS Associate Professor of Pediatrics The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Lebanon, NH 03756 Medical Research: What … Continue reading →
The post Babies’ Microbiome Affected by Cesarean Section and Formula Feeding appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Annie Gatewood Hoen, PhD, & Juliette Madan, MD, MS. (2016) Babies' Microbiome Affected by Cesarean Section and Formula Feeding. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 11, 2016
  • 02:17 PM
  • 78 views

Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Are At Increased Risk of Cancer Mortality

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sergio A. Acuna, MD Graduate Student at St. Michael’s Hospital and IHPME University of Toronto Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Acuna: Solid organ transplant recipients are known to be at greater risk of developing … Continue reading →
The post Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Are At Increased Risk of Cancer Mortality appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Dr. Sergio A. Acuna. (2016) Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Are At Increased Risk of Cancer Mortality. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 11, 2016
  • 01:48 PM
  • 69 views

Exercise and Education Prevent Back Pain, Devices Do Not

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Daniel Steffens, Ph.D. The George Institute for Global Health The University of Sydney Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Steffens: Back pain is a leading cause of disease burden globally. At present, a … Continue reading →
The post Exercise and Education Prevent Back Pain, Devices Do Not appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Daniel Steffens, Ph.D. (2015) Exercise and Education Prevent Back Pain, Devices Do Not. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 11, 2016
  • 12:39 PM
  • 166 views

Pallor, green sickness, and blue-grey patches: The colours of broken blood

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

Anemia is a condition where the ability of your blood to transport oxygen throughout your body is somehow compromised. People with anemia often feel tired and weak since their cells aren't getting enough of the gas to function optimally.Our blood contains red blood cells, which in turn contain a red molecule called hemoglobin. Each of the four proteins making up a hemoglobin is equipped with an atom of oxygen-binding iron. Anemia can be the result of not having enough red blood cells or these cells not containing enough hemoglobin. In other instances, cells and/or hemoglobin are in good supply but their structure is altered such that they aren't as good at carrying oxygen or are prone to breaking down (e.g. sickle-cell disease).About a zillion things can cause anemia, usually via one of three mechanisms: (1) the disruption of red blood cell production (e.g. not having enough iron or vitamin B12 to fuel this process) (e.g. damage to bone marrow, where the cells are produced, via toxic agents such as anticancer drugs or benzene), (2) the destruction of red blood cells (e.g. via their infection with the parasite responsible for malaria), or (3) the loss of substantial amounts of blood (e.g. via heavy periods or bleeding stomach ulcers).Abnormally small and washed out red blood cells from a person with iron deficiency anemia (Source)Along with feeling like crap, a common symptom of anemia is the abnormal loss of skin colour. This extreme paleness, also known as pallor, tends to be most notable when looking at a person's lips or the palms of their hands and feet. It's the result of there being less red-coloured hemoglobin in the blood flowing near the surface of a person's body, which normally imparts a bit of colour (blushing from embarrassment is just more hemoglobin/blood flowing near the surface of your face). A yellowish pallor is sometimes seen with anemia due to lead poisoning.A form of anemia reported prior to the 20th century but no longer seen these days was known as chlorosis (Greek khloros = pale green) or green sickness due to the skin of those afflicted taking on a greenish tint. It was most common in adolescent females, likely arising from a potent combination of poor nutrition, rapid growth, and menstruation. Not exactly a great recipe for having enough iron! It's not entirely clear why this particular illness has disappeared, but it's probably linked to everyone eating better.Incidentally, chlorosis also refers to a condition in plants where their leaves contain abnormally low amounts of green chlorophyll and so have a pale and yellowish colour. The reduced ability of these leaves to carry out photosynthesis sort of parallels the reduced ability of anemia-impacted blood to carry oxygen, and both conditions can be caused by an iron deficiency.Chlorosis affecting the leaves of a strawberry plant (Source)One final skin colour change associated with anemia can result when iron-containing drugs (e.g. iron dextran) are injected into a person to treat an iron deficiency and thus restore hemoglobin production to normal levels. Such an injection can produce a localized blue-grey or brown discolouration of the skin, which I'm guessing is due to a bit of iron being deposited within the skin where it reacts with other elements to form dark coloured compounds (e.g. iron sulfide).ReferencesDereure O. 2001. Drug-induced skin pigmentation. Epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology 2(4):253-262.Hernberg S. 2000. Lead poisoning in a historical perspective. American Journal of Industrial Medicine 38(3):244-254.Sheftel AD, Mason AB, Ponka P. 2012. The long history of iron in the Universe and in health and disease. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 1820(3):161-187. [Full text]... Read more »

  • January 11, 2016
  • 07:39 AM
  • 78 views

Treatment of Sleep Disorders Reduced Congestive Heart Failure Readmissions

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sunil Sharma MD, FAASM Associate Professor of Medicine Director, Pulmonary Sleep Medicine Associate Director, Jefferson Sleep Disorders Center Thomas Jefferson University and Hospitals Philadelphia, PA 19107 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Sharma: … Continue reading →
The post Treatment of Sleep Disorders Reduced Congestive Heart Failure Readmissions appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Dr. Sunil Sharma. (2016) Treatment of Sleep Disorders Reduced Congestive Heart Failure Readmissions. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 11, 2016
  • 07:06 AM
  • 163 views

Natural clays can help in the fight against bacteria

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Natural clay (such as Oregon Blue clay) can help in killing a broad range of bacterial pathogens including antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Published in:

Scientific Reports

Study Further:

Researchers have reported that natural antibacterial clays upon hydration and topical application can kill human pathogens and these pathogens also include antibiotic resistant strains. They noted that only certain clays are bactericidal in nature. Those clays having soluble reduced metals along with expandable clay minerals that can absorb cations, have an ability for extended metal release and creation of toxic hydroxyl radicals (thereby attacking bacteria).

Researchers wrote that soluble Fe2 and Al3 are among the most important antibacterial components that can promote killing of pathogens by attacking multiple cellular systems. They provided the mechanisms also; Al3 misfolds the proteins of cell membranes and Fe2 promotes membrane oxidation. Fe2 also enters the cytoplasm causing hydroxyl radical attack on DNA and intracellular proteins.

Researchers also reported that this geochemical method of attacking and killing bacteria is more effective as compared to metal solutions alone. It also provides an alternative antibacterial strategy for killing bacteria.

“Discovery of this bactericidal mechanism demonstrated by natural clays should guide designs of new mineral-based antibacterial agents,” Researchers wrote.

Source:

Morrison, K., Misra, R., & Williams, L. (2016). Unearthing the Antibacterial Mechanism of Medicinal Clay: A Geochemical Approach to Combating Antibiotic Resistance Scientific Reports, 6 DOI: 10.1038/srep19043... Read more »

  • January 11, 2016
  • 02:48 AM
  • 177 views

Fish oils for schizophrenia?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Hot on the heels of the peer-reviewed research-based suggestion that fish oil supplementation (high in omega-3 PUFAs) might have some rather important effects pertinent to the transition to full-threshold psychotic disorder for 'young people with an at-risk mental state' (see here), are the results from Tomasz Pawełczyk and colleagues [1].This time around it was a randomised, placebo-controlled trial "of either 2.2 g/day of n-3 PUFA, or olive oil placebo, with regard to symptom severity in first-episode schizophrenia patients." I might add that we have been expecting these results given the publication of the trial protocol not so long ago [2]. n-3 by the way, refers to omega-3 or rather the Greek lower case character ω or ωμέγα.Seventy-one participants were randomly assigned to olive oil (placebo) or "1320 mg/day of EPA and 880 mg/day of DHA" and monitored over the course of the 26-week study period. "The primary outcome measure of the clinical evaluation was schizophrenia symptom severity change measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS)."Results: quite a few changes were noted as a consequence of the fish oil supplementation including that: "A fifty-percent improvement in symptom severity was achieved significantly more frequently in the n-3 PUFA group than in the placebo group." Also: "N-3 PUFA intervention was also associated with an improvement in general psychopathology, measured by means of PANSS... depressive symptoms..., the level of functioning... and clinical global impression." All-in-all, there was quite a bit to see from the use of a humble fish oil supplement in this cohort and hence quite a bit more research is indicated.A quick survey of the other research literature in this area suggests that the Pawełczyk findings were probably not unexpected. A Cochrane Review ('Cochrane does...') a few years back [3] pointed out that whilst the available literature at that time was not all one-way when it comes to the use of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for people with schizophrenia, there were pockets of evidence suggesting some positive effects might be had from this quite simple intervention. Some but not all subsequent trials have hinted as possible positive effects for some on the schizophrenia spectrum.If I had to quibble with the Pawełczyk study in any way I might suggest that one has to be slightly cautious about the use of olive oil as a placebo condition. Bearing in mind my not confusing a high fat diet with a ketogenic diet (high fat / low carbohydrate), one has to pause a little to take in the potentially interesting mouse results published by Ann Katrin Kraeuter and colleagues [4] that some media have headlined with "High fat/low carb diet could combat schizophrenia." I personally would like to see the fish oils pitted against a non-fat alternative in clinical study just to be sure.Music: and what else but goodbye to a legend...----------[1] Pawełczyk T. et al. A randomized controlled study of the efficacy of six-month supplementation with concentrated fish oil rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in first episode schizophrenia. J Psychiatr Res. 2015 Nov 25;73:34-44.[2] Pawełczyk T. et al. Omega-3 fatty acids in first-episode schizophrenia - a randomized controlled study of efficacy and relapse prevention (OFFER): rationale, design, and methods. BMC Psychiatry. 2015 May 2;15:97.[3] Joy CB. et al. Polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation for schizophrenia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2003;(2):CD001257.[4] Kraeuter AK. et al. Ketogenic diet reverses behavioral abnormalities in an acute NMDA receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia. Schizophr Res. 2015 Dec;169(1-3):491-3.----------Pawełczyk, T., Grancow-Grabka, M., Kotlicka-Antczak, M., Trafalska, E., & Pawełczyk, A. (2016). A randomized controlled study of the efficacy of six-month supplementation with concentrated fish oil rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in first episode schizophrenia Journal of Psychiatric Research, 73, 34-44 DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.11.013... Read more »

  • January 10, 2016
  • 02:37 PM
  • 169 views

Put the cellphone away! Fragmented baby care can affect brain development

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Mothers, put down your smartphones when caring for your babies! That's the message from University of California, Irvine researchers, who have found that fragmented and chaotic maternal care can disrupt proper brain development, which can lead to emotional disorders later in life.... Read more »

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