Post List

Neuroscience posts

(Modify Search »)

  • June 29, 2011
  • 05:08 AM
  • 839 views

Eagle-Eyed Autism? No.

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

An interesting and refreshing paper from Simon Baron-Cohen's autism group from Cambridge. The results themselves are pretty boring - they found that people with autism have normal vision.But the story behind it is rather spicy.Back in 2009, a Cambridge group - different authors, but led by "SBC", published a report claiming that people with autism have exceptionally acute vision. Their average visual acuity was claimed to be 2.8On this scale, 1.0 is defined as normal, and a sharp-eyed young adul........ Read more »

  • June 29, 2011
  • 01:31 AM
  • 1,580 views

REPOST: Dopamine and Reward Prediction, or your brain on Rickroll

by Scicurious in Neurotic Physiology

Today Sci is going to blog a paper that she has been meaning to blog for a long time. It's one of those papers that people who do certain kinds of science snuggle with when they go to sleep at night. (Sci and this paper) But the real reason that Sci loves this paper is [...]... Read more »

  • June 29, 2011
  • 12:20 AM
  • 1,418 views

Promising results from a graded retraining programme in chronic back pain

by Lorimer Moseley in BodyInMind

TweetReduction in pain and disability with a graded sensorimotor retraining program in chronic back pain Our team recently returned home from Darwin, where we all attended the Australian Pain Society’s Annual Scientific Meeting.  We all presented some of our work up there and had a lot of fun while we were at it.  I presented [...]... Read more »

  • June 28, 2011
  • 03:19 PM
  • 1,361 views

Persistent Insomnia in Depression Responding to Antidepressants

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Sleep problems commonly occur as part of a problem with mood disorders including depression.  Changes in sleep duration (insomnia or hypersomnia) are one of the criteria for the diagnosis of depression in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.  Although not absolutely required for the diagnosis, insomnia is a complaint in the the majority of subjects presenting for clinical trials in the treatment of depression.The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SS........ Read more »

  • June 28, 2011
  • 11:00 AM
  • 942 views

This is your brain in the city

by Tim De Chant in Per Square Mile

For a kid who spent much of his childhood outdoors—alternately splitting time between the wooded park down the street, my friends’ backyards, and a patch of countryside my parent’s tended—I have been spending a lot of time in rather large cities as an adult. Ever since I left college, I’ve lived in cities that count [...]... Read more »

Lederbogen, F., Kirsch, P., Haddad, L., Streit, F., Tost, H., Schuch, P., Wüst, S., Pruessner, J., Rietschel, M., Deuschle, M.... (2011) City living and urban upbringing affect neural social stress processing in humans. Nature, 474(7352), 498-501. DOI: 10.1038/nature10190  

  • June 28, 2011
  • 04:15 AM
  • 1,445 views

Complex interactions among epilepsy genes

by Kevin Mitchell in Wiring the Brain

A debate has been raging over the last few years over the nature of the genetic architecture of so-called “complex” disorders. These are disorders - such as schizophrenia, epilepsy, type II diabetes and many others - which are clearly heritable across the population, but which do not show simple patterns of inheritance. A new study looking at the profile of mutations in hundreds of genes in patients with epilepsy dramatically illustrates this complexity. The possible implications are far........ Read more »

Klassen T, Davis C, Goldman A, Burgess D, Chen T, Wheeler D, McPherson J, Bourquin T, Lewis L, Villasana D.... (2011) Exome sequencing of ion channel genes reveals complex profiles confounding personal risk assessment in epilepsy. Cell, 145(7), 1036-48. PMID: 21703448  

Kasperaviciute, D., Catarino, C., Heinzen, E., Depondt, C., Cavalleri, G., Caboclo, L., Tate, S., Jamnadas-Khoda, J., Chinthapalli, K., Clayton, L.... (2010) Common genetic variation and susceptibility to partial epilepsies: a genome-wide association study. Brain, 133(7), 2136-2147. DOI: 10.1093/brain/awq130  

Mitchell KJ. (2011) The genetics of neurodevelopmental disease. Current opinion in neurobiology, 21(1), 197-203. PMID: 20832285  

  • June 27, 2011
  • 07:24 PM
  • 1,005 views

Nicotine, appetite and the brain

by Daniel in Ego sum Daniel

Nicotine is not only very, very addictive, as a central nervous system stimulant it can also affect our motivations and behaviors in a wider sense. One of the behaviors it can modify is appetitive behavior. It's a well-funded fact that smokers tend to have a lower body-mass than non-smokers, and that smokers who quit have a tendency to gain weight, although until now the neurobiological mechanism for this modulation was unknown.

Recent findings from two different publications reveal parts........ Read more »

  • June 27, 2011
  • 05:00 PM
  • 1,021 views

A Walk Along the Paper Trail: Bitter Trail Mix

by Michael Patterson in ...And You Will Know Me By The Trail of Papers

A summary of one of the first papers to report the bitter taste receptrs... Read more »

CHANDRASHEKAR, J., Ken L Mueller1, Mark A Hoon2, Elliot Adler2, Luxin Feng3, Wei Guo1, Charles S Zuker1, §, *, and Nicholas J.P Ryba2, §. (2000) T2Rs Function as Bitter Taste Receptors. Cell, 100(6), 703-711. DOI: 10.1016/S0092-8674(00)80706-0  

  • June 27, 2011
  • 03:43 PM
  • 914 views

Yellow gold : Turmeric and its promise

by Sarah Stephen in An ecological oratorio

Growing up in Southern India, we cultivated several vegetables and spices in our backyard, one of which was turmeric. Turmeric (Curcuma longa) belongs to the same family as ginger. It is rhizomatous herb and normally pieces of the rhizome are planted in the rainy months of July. In our hands, the plants did not require much care at all. No artificial fertilizers were used nor wwere the plants watered but only left to the mercy of nature. But our part of South India is blessed with rains anyway........ Read more »

  • June 26, 2011
  • 01:00 PM
  • 1,704 views

Dissecting the language of the birds, or how to talk to a songbird

by aatishb in Empirical Zeal

Young children have an uncanny ability to pick up new languages. Not only can they soak up new vocabulary, but they can also construct new sentences of their own. This ability to use grammar is the essence of language. It’s … Continue reading →... Read more »

Kentaro Abe, & Dai Watanabe. (2011) Songbirds possess the spontaneous ability to discriminate syntactic rules. Nature Neuroscience. info:/10.1038/nn.2869

Fehér, O., Wang, H., Saar, S., Mitra, P., & Tchernichovski, O. (2009) De novo establishment of wild-type song culture in the zebra finch. Nature, 459(7246), 564-568. DOI: 10.1038/nature07994  

  • June 25, 2011
  • 04:46 PM
  • 1,281 views

That Pesky Gambling Question

by Dirk Hanson in Addiction Inbox


The DSM-V is set to label problem gambling an addiction.

Nobody has ever bet enough on the winning horse.
— Unknown wise person

I used to gamble. Back when I did, I was also an active alcoholic and a chain smoker. Camel filters, if you’re wondering. And we had a running joke, my wife and I, although the humor leaked out of it for her pretty quickly. We would breach the doors of the gambling palace, and plunge into the dark, icy interior of a casino at Las Vegas or Tahoe, and stand on the........ Read more »

  • June 24, 2011
  • 08:37 PM
  • 1,652 views

Screening for autism in infants and toddlers

by Jon Brock in Cracking the Enigma

It’s widely believed that early intervention is crucial for long-term prognosis in autism and that the earlier the intervention begins the better. Getting in early, of course, requires that autistic children are identified at a young age. But even for more severe forms of autism, children are rarely diagnosed before three to four years of age. With this in mind, the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended screening all toddlers for autism.However, writing in next July’s issue of Pedia........ Read more »

  • June 24, 2011
  • 01:23 AM
  • 1,140 views

Friday Weird Science: Antidepressants affect sexual behavior...but HOW?

by Scicurious in Neurotic Physiology

I was very pleased to run across this paper a few weeks ago.  I answer a LOT of questions about psychiatric drugs (on blog and IRL), and one of the most frequent ones is "DO antidepressants hurt sexual activity?" and "HOW?" As for whether they DO, well, yes.  The most popular class of antidepressants, the [...]... Read more »

  • June 23, 2011
  • 06:06 PM
  • 2,237 views

Happy 99th Birthday, Alan Turing

by Jon Wilkins in Lost in Transcription

So, today (June 23, 2011) marks the 99th anniversary of the birth of Alan Turing, British supergenius who played a critical role in winning World War II and is one of the founding fathers of computer science.

He was also gay, which was illegal Britain at the time. In 1952 he was prosecuted under the same law that had sent Oscar Wilde to gaol. He chose to undergo chemical castration (in the form of treatment with feminizing hormones) as an alternative to prison.

In 1954 he committed suicide in ........ Read more »

Turing, A. M. (1950) Computing Machinery and Intelligence. Mind, 59(236), 433-460. info:/

  • June 23, 2011
  • 08:41 AM
  • 1,640 views

Brain Basis for Emotion Recognition Deficits in Depression

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

There is a emerging understanding of the role of social perception problems in depression and anxiety disorders.  Depression appears to effect the cognitive ability to judge the facial expression of others.  This impairment poses a challenge for interpersonal function and social relationships.  Research is now pinning down the neural basis for this deficit and to determine it’s persistence and the effect of depression remission on this social cognition function.van Winge........ Read more »

van Wingen, G., van Eijndhoven, P., Tendolkar, I., Buitelaar, J., Verkes, R., & Fernández, G. (2010) Neural basis of emotion recognition deficits in first-episode major depression. Psychological Medicine, 41(07), 1397-1405. DOI: 10.1017/S0033291710002084  

  • June 23, 2011
  • 04:58 AM
  • 1,538 views

Clinical features and PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF CRPS – a long-awaited review

by Lorimer Moseley in BodyInMind

At the world congress on pain in Glasgow, 2008, a small group of CRPS researchers got around a table and asked each other something like ‘isn’t it high time we got together and wrote a current concepts in CRPS pathophysiology paper?’ ... Read more »

Marinus J, Moseley GL, Birklein F, Baron R, Maihöfner C, Kingery WS, & van Hilten JJ. (2011) Clinical features and pathophysiology of complex regional pain syndrome. Lancet neurology, 10(7), 637-48. PMID: 21683929  

  • June 22, 2011
  • 04:50 PM
  • 1,741 views

Songs sound less sad when you’re older

by Maria P. in noustuff

Music is a powerful tool of expressing and inducing emotions. Lima and colleagues aimed at investigating whether and how emotion recognition in music changes as a function of ageing. Their study revealed that older participants showed decreased responses to music expressing negative emotions, while their perception of happy emotions remained stable. Emotion plays an important [...]... Read more »

Mitterschiffthaler, M., Fu, C., Dalton, J., Andrew, C., & Williams, S. (2007) A functional MRI study of happy and sad affective states induced by classical music. Human Brain Mapping, 28(11), 1150-1162. DOI: 10.1002/hbm.20337  

  • June 22, 2011
  • 01:18 PM
  • 1,375 views

Living or growing up in a city is associated with heightened brain sensitivity to social stress

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Without fanfare or formal announcement, human civilisation has passed a momentous milestone. For the first time, more of us now live in cities than in rural communities. The benefits are numerous: more jobs, better access to educational and health services, more potential friends, and on the list goes. Yet city living has its dark side. Crime, deprivation and inequality are usually higher and so are rates of mental illness, including more anxiety, depression and schizophrenia. A new paper has ma........ Read more »

F Lederbogen, P Kirsch, L Haddad, F Streit, H Tost, & and six others. (2011) City living and urban upbringing affect neural social stress processing in humans. Nature. info:/10.1038/nature10190

  • June 22, 2011
  • 05:24 AM
  • 1,019 views

N1 Specialization in Children with Dyslexia

by Livia in Reading and Word Recognition Research

Accessibility:  Advanced

It's been a little while, but we've been talking about the N1 component and how it relates to reading. Just to recap, the N1 component is an ERP component occurring at around 170 ms. In normal reading adults, the component is stronger for words than for symbols. We will refer to the words minus symbols difference as “N1 specialization for words .” Pre-reading kindergartners do not have this N1 specialization, while second graders have a stronger N1 specializa........ Read more »

Maurer U, Brem S, Bucher K, Kranz F, Benz R, Steinhausen HC, & Brandeis D. (2007) Impaired tuning of a fast occipito-temporal response for print in dyslexic children learning to read. Brain : a journal of neurology, 130(Pt 12), 3200-10. PMID: 17728359  

  • June 22, 2011
  • 05:24 AM
  • 1,042 views

N1 Specialization in Children with Dyslexia

by Livia in Reading and Word Recognition Research

Accessibility:  Advanced

It's been a little while, but we've been talking about the N1 component and how it relates to reading. Just to recap, the N1 component is an ERP component occurring at around 170 ms. In normal reading adults, the component is stronger for words than for symbols. We will refer to the words minus symbols difference as “N1 specialization for words .” Pre-reading kindergartners do not have this N1 specialization, while second graders have a stronger N1 specializa........ Read more »

Maurer U, Brem S, Bucher K, Kranz F, Benz R, Steinhausen HC, & Brandeis D. (2007) Impaired tuning of a fast occipito-temporal response for print in dyslexic children learning to read. Brain : a journal of neurology, 130(Pt 12), 3200-10. PMID: 17728359  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.