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  • July 31, 2014
  • 01:33 PM
  • 630 views

Mitochondria and Anti Aging

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

I’m sure you can all relate, you go to fix the sink and in the process you build a new kitchen on accident. Anyone… no? Well that is sort of […]... Read more »

  • July 31, 2014
  • 08:39 AM
  • 890 views

3-D Nanostructure Could Efficiently Store Gas

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Scientists at at Rice University predict functional advantages of a three-dimensional porous nanostructure that could benefit gas storage, nanoelectronics, and composite materials that perform multiple functions.... Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 06:48 PM
  • 1,901 views

Keeping lithium contained: new design allows for high energy-density anode in Li-ion batteries

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Researchers have found a way to limit volume expansion and prevent dendrite formation of all-lithium anodes. This promises to increase the energy density of Li-ion batteries!... Read more »

Zheng, G., Lee, S., Liang, Z., Lee, H., Yan, K., Yao, H., Wang, H., Li, W., Chu, S., & Cui, Y. (2014) Interconnected hollow carbon nanospheres for stable lithium metal anodes. Nature Nanotechnology. DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2014.152  

  • July 30, 2014
  • 01:31 PM
  • 867 views

Suicide, it might be in the blood

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

I tried to kill myself, more than once in fact. It was a troubling time for me and as a former active duty Marine that might not be too surprising […]... Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 06:59 AM
  • 778 views

Efficient Room-Temperature Phosphorescent OLEDs Developed

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

The team of Jinsang Kim, a professor of materials science and engineering and chemical engineering at the University of Michigan, developed bright, metal-free, organic, phosphorescent light emitters.... Read more »

  • July 28, 2014
  • 06:56 AM
  • 708 views

Model Predicts Carbon Components’ Performance as Electrodes

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Rice University have created a theoretical model that predicts how carbon components will perform as anodes in lithium-ion batteries.... Read more »

  • July 26, 2014
  • 01:18 PM
  • 664 views

Save the Neurons: Fighting the Effects of Parkinsons

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Possibly one of the most famous cases of parkinson’s is Michael J. Fox. More than just the “shakes” parkinson’s can cause a whole host of other problems mentally and physically […]... Read more »

  • July 25, 2014
  • 12:00 PM
  • 654 views

The Friday Five 07/25/14

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Five of the coolest news stories from the past week... Read more »

  • July 25, 2014
  • 05:48 AM
  • 834 views

Technique Produces Next-Gen Electrodes for Li-Ion Batteries

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Scientists at the University of Tokyo have developed an approach with industrial potential to produce nano-sized composite silicon-based powders as negative electrodes for the next generation lithium ion batteries.... Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 05:51 PM
  • 732 views

Lanthanum-Based Perovskite Materials to Improve Fuel Cells

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Scientists at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) have studied the effects of using lanthanum-based perovskite ceramic contact materials in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs).... Read more »

  • July 22, 2014
  • 03:38 PM
  • 734 views

Cheaper Platinum-Yttrium Fuel Cell Catalyst Developed

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Researchers at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) report that they have developed a platinum-yttrium fuel cell catalyst which is stable, more active and less expensive than the existing platinum catalysts.... Read more »

Patricia Hernandez-Fernandez, Federico Masini, David N. McCarthy, Christian E. Strebel, Daniel Friebel, Davide Deiana, Paolo Malacrida, Anders Nierhoff, Anders Bodin, Anna M. Wise, Jane H. Nielsen, Thomas W. Hansen, Anders Nilsson, Ifan E. L. . (2014) Mass-selected nanoparticles of PtxY as model catalysts for ​oxygen electroreduction. Nature Chemistry. info:/10.1038/nchem.2001

  • July 20, 2014
  • 11:33 AM
  • 570 views

Antiretrovirals and Pregnancy Risk

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Don’t drink when you are pregnant, we all know that you aren’t supposed to do that. We also know you shouldn’t smoke, use drugs, and should talk to your Doctor […]... Read more »

Mugo NR, Hong T, Celum C, Donnell D, Bukusi EA, John-Stewart G, Wangisi J, Were E, Heffron R, Matthews LT.... (2014) Pregnancy Incidence and Outcomes Among Women Receiving Preexposure Prophylaxis for HIV Prevention: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 312(4), 362-371. PMID: 25038355  

  • July 20, 2014
  • 11:21 AM
  • 812 views

Slowing Heart Disease

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Stopping just one minor enzyme leads to an entire cascade of pathways that can slow heart disease. [Infographic]... Read more »

Blazevic T, Schwaiberger AV, Schreiner CE, Schachner D, Schaible AM, Grojer CS, Atanasov AG, Werz O, Dirsch VM, & Heiss EH. (2013) 12/15-lipoxygenase contributes to platelet-derived growth factor-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. The Journal of biological chemistry, 288(49), 35592-603. PMID: 24165129  

  • July 19, 2014
  • 02:39 PM
  • 609 views

HIV and Hepatitis C: A New Treatment Coming Soon!!

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The old saying it could always be worse might not sound like it would apply to HIV patients. Then again if you had HIV and hepatitis C, that would probably […]... Read more »

Sulkowski, M., Naggie, S., Lalezari, J., Fessel, W., Mounzer, K., Shuhart, M., Luetkemeyer, A., Asmuth, D., Gaggar, A., Ni, L.... (2014) Sofosbuvir and Ribavirin for Hepatitis C in Patients With HIV Coinfection. JAMA, 312(4), 353. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.7734  

  • July 18, 2014
  • 08:09 AM
  • 831 views

Carbon-Based Catalyst for Batteries, Fuel Cells Developed

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Chemists at the Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany, have developed a carbon-based catalyst for water electrolysis and hydrogen combustion.... Read more »

  • July 16, 2014
  • 08:58 PM
  • 941 views

Linear is beautiful! A simple relationship provides guidance for optimal battery design

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Computational physicists to the rescue! Researchers have found a linear relationship between key quantities in battery electrodes to aid the guidance of choosing optimal materials for performance.... Read more »

  • July 16, 2014
  • 01:01 PM
  • 832 views

More Horror from Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Deepwater Horizon, it was a technological feat to get oil that deep in the water. Then the spill occurred, when it happened I honestly think more people were in shock […]... Read more »

White, H., Lyons, S., Harrison, S., Findley, D., Liu, Y., & Kujawinski, E. (2014) Long-Term Persistence of Dispersants following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. Environmental Science , 1(7), 295-299. DOI: 10.1021/ez500168r  

  • July 15, 2014
  • 01:30 PM
  • 640 views

Schizophrenia and Autism: A New Connection

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Autism and Schizophrenia, at first glance there probably isn’t a whole lot in common other than they are disorders that fall in that lovely book the DCM-5. The brain is […]... Read more »

Chie Shimamoto1,, Tetsuo Ohnishi, Motoko Maekawa, Akiko Watanabe, Hisako Ohba, Ryoichi Arai, Yoshimi Iwayama, Yasuko Hisano, Tomoko Toyota, Manabu Toyoshima.... (2014) Functional characterization of FABP3, 5 and 7 gene variants identified in schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder and mouse behavioral studies. Human Molecular Genetics. info:/10.1093/hmg/ddu369

  • July 15, 2014
  • 11:50 AM
  • 1,097 views

Breaking Up is Hard to Do: Photosynthesis, Water-Splitting, and the OEC

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

A very very cool paper was recently published online. The paper details a study that shows the first images of water splitting apart during photosynthesis. So pick you jaw up off the table and we’ll get into the nitty-gritty details. Let’s start by accessing your long-term memory, dragging out some of that basic biology information you buried after high school and grabbing on to that dusty file about photosynthesis. If you remember, plants have little green, bean-shaped energy factories in their cells called chloroplasts. These chloroplasts are filled thylakoids stacked up in grana. The thylakoid membranes contain networks of pigments, including chlorophyll, arranged in aggregates or complexes. Think of them kinda like light energy harvesters. Energy is captured for functional and structural units of protein complexes called Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII). PSI is the light reaction and converts light energy to chemical energy. The pigments of the complexes each absorb light and then pass along that light energy to the central chlorophyll molecule to do photosynthesis. The energy obtained in this reaction is stored in ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase) molecules. PSII, the dark reaction, takes place in the stroma within the chloroplast. This reaction uses the Calvin cycle to convert carbon dioxide and energy from ATP into glucose (sugar). To say that is photosynthesis put shortly and simply would be an understatement, but keep this basic reaction in mind:6 CO2 + 6 H2O à C6H12O6 + 6 O2It is important to mention that in PSII, water is photochemically oxidized to dioxygen (O2) by the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), a metalloenzyme cluster containing manganese and calcium. The OEC cycles through five photo-catalytic stages (S0-S4) in which four electrons are sequentially extracted from the OEC in four light-driven charge-separation events by a repeatedly photo-oxidized chlorophyll center (Kok cycle). This is the reaction that makes all that oxygen we breathe.2 H2O à S0-S4 à O2 + 4 H+ + 4 e-Photo by: Mary Zhu @ ASUThe new paper by Kupitz et al. (and al. and al. and al.) published in Nature looks closer (very close!) at this PSII water-splitting reaction. They had some issues to overcome if they wanted to collect more information on this reaction, mostly involving the static nature of X-ray crystallography and the damage done to the OEC with this method. Traditional X-ray crystallography enables 1.9Å resolution (near atomic) but the OEC probably suffers X-ray damage. To overcome this, the researchers used serial femtosecond crystallography. This method uses single shot diffraction patterns are collected from a stream of nanocrystals, using 120 Hz femtosecond (one millionth of a nanosecond!!) pulses from an X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL). The second is the quality of the structural information. These pulses are so intense that the sample/specimen is destroyed, but the pulse duration is so short that the diffraction is observed before the destruction occurs. The method produces millions of “snapshots” in hours and can collect time-resolved data for dynamic processes like water oxidation in PSII.The researchers developed a multiple-laser illumination scheme to observe this dynamic reaction in thermophilic cyanobacterium (Thermosynechococcus elongates). They progressively excited the OEC in dark-adapted PSII nano/microcrystals by two laser pulses from the dark S1 state via the S2 state to the double-flash putative S3 state (5 and 5.5Å resolution). Believe it or not, that was their method put simply. Essentially, they were able to determine the structures of the states and to produce maps of the protein subunits and cofactors of PSII, including the electron transport chain. They found that PSII undergoes significant conformational changes electron acceptor side and at the Mn4CaO5 core of the OEC. The metal cluster significantly elongates, making room and allowing for binding of the incoming water molecules. Then voilà! Water splitting!So I know what you may be thinking: Why all of that lead-up to a simple protein shape change conclusion? Well, it’s all about mechanism, figuring out the process of photosynthesis at its most basic level. If you think about it, photosynthesis is the biological reaction. It is fundamental to life on Earth as we know it. It converted the oxygen-poor atmosphere of early Earth to the oxygen-rich atmosphere we (and all other respiring organisms) depend on, and continues to supply us with life-giving oxygen. That oxygen comes from this water splitting reaction, and the OEC is one of those structures where you usually have to but "possible model of..." in front. This type of study gives incredible resolution of this structure as well as a new methodology to gain further knowledge. With a more technological viewpoint, work like this could eventually lead to the development of an artificial leaf and synthetic photosynthesis. And, let’s face it, that is really really cool.Kupitz, C., Basu, S.... Read more »

Kupitz, C., Basu, S., Grotjohann, I., Fromme, R., Zatsepin, N., Rendek, K., Hunter, M., Shoeman, R., White, T., Wang, D.... (2014) Serial time-resolved crystallography of photosystem II using a femtosecond X-ray laser. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature13453  

  • July 14, 2014
  • 03:37 PM
  • 681 views

Laser Helps Understand Inner Workings of Solar Panels

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Believe it or not we don’t totally understand how solar cells work, particularly organic thin-film photovoltaics. But scientists Canada, London and Cyprus have recently used lasers to shed some light into the process, which could help make more efficient solar panels tomorrow.... Read more »

Provencher, F., Bérubé, N., Parker, A., Greetham, G., Towrie, M., Hellmann, C., Côté, M., Stingelin, N., Silva, C., & Hayes, S. (2014) Direct observation of ultrafast long-range charge separation at polymer–fullerene heterojunctions. Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms5288  

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