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  • November 22, 2012
  • 02:01 PM
  • 213 views

Curious Cosmos

by Emarkham in GeneticCuckoo

A discussion of the recent advances in space exploration, looking specifically at the Mars Rover landing as well as other space phenomena during 2012. ... Read more »

E Markham. (2012) Curious Cosmos. Blogspot. info:/

  • November 20, 2012
  • 05:34 AM
  • 896 views

A first paper on square root of a Brownian motion and quantum mechanics gets published!

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

Following my series of posts on the link between the square root of a stochastic process and quantum mechanics (see here, here, here, here, here), that I proved to exist both theoretically and experimentally, I am pleased to let you know that the first paper of my collaboration with Alfonso Farina and Matteo Sedehi was [...]... Read more »

Farina, A., Giompapa, S., Graziano, A., Liburdi, A., Ravanelli, M., & Zirilli, F. (2011) Tartaglia-Pascal’s triangle: a historical perspective with applications. Signal, Image and Video Processing. DOI: 10.1007/s11760-011-0228-6  

  • November 19, 2012
  • 01:27 AM
  • 558 views

Airbag Saved My Life: the Carolina Review’s Clinical Derpitude Continues

by csoeder in Topologic Oceans

I had thought that once I graduated college, annoying student publications would quit being so… annoying. Alas, this isn’t the case. A previous article examined the quality of analysis at the Carolina Review, UNC’s ‘journal of conservative thought and opinion’; let’s see if things have approved any in the handful of years that I’ve been [...]... Read more »

Wenzel, T., & Ross, M. (2008) Safer Vehicles for People and the Planet. American Scientist, 96(2), 122. DOI: 10.1511/2008.70.3638  

  • November 18, 2012
  • 03:39 PM
  • 555 views

DHSs and histone modifications: methylation, acetylation, citrullination, and phosphorylation

by egonw in Chem-bla-ics

One day on, and still struggling with the chemistry behind gene regulation. Let no biologist ever tell me again not to use acronyms (yes, I am looking at you!). But it is interesting. I learned a lot about ChIP, histone modifications, etc, etc. This is an amazing world, where specific histone complex protein residues get methylated, acetylated, citrullinated, and phosphorylated. Of course, all this is in the context of the ENCODE meeting we have tomorrow at BiGCaT, where I will try to ........ Read more »

Thurman, R., Rynes, E., Humbert, R., Vierstra, J., Maurano, M., Haugen, E., Sheffield, N., Stergachis, A., Wang, H., Vernot, B.... (2012) The accessible chromatin landscape of the human genome. Nature, 489(7414), 75-82. DOI: 10.1038/nature11232  

Felsenfeld G, Boyes J, Chung J, Clark D, & Studitsky V. (1996) Chromatin structure and gene expression. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 93(18), 9384-8. PMID: 8790338  

  • November 16, 2012
  • 03:42 PM
  • 648 views

How to Build a Neuron: step 3

by TheCellularScale in The Cellular Scale

Steps 1 and 2 of neuron-building, as well as an important set of shortcuts can be found in the How to Build a Neuron index. Step 3 is deciding which simulation software or programming language you want to use. Simulated Neuron in Genesis (source)The big two are Genesis and Neuron. They are pretty similar in a lot of ways, but Genesis runs in Linux and Neuron runs in windows. However, you can run Genesis in windows if you install the Linux environment Cygwin.Both programs can read in morphologica........ Read more »

Gleeson P, Crook S, Cannon RC, Hines ML, Billings GO, Farinella M, Morse TM, Davison AP, Ray S, Bhalla US.... (2010) NeuroML: a language for describing data driven models of neurons and networks with a high degree of biological detail. PLoS computational biology, 6(6). PMID: 20585541  

  • November 16, 2012
  • 01:02 PM
  • 571 views

The Disposable Dilemma

by Whitney Campbell in Green Screen

Expendable objects were not innovated recently. Although washi are now linked to origami, for instance, people have been using the small sheets as disposable facial tissues since at least the seventeenth century, when the litter of Hasekura Tsunenaga's retinue reportedly surprised French courtiers. Similarly, around 200,000 to 400,000 years earlier, hominins near present-day Tel Aviv temporarily used flint flakes to carve meat, later startling archeologists with the "short-lived usage&........ Read more »

  • November 16, 2012
  • 11:00 AM
  • 580 views

Scientists print out ‘walking’ biological machines

by Flora Malein in floramalein.com

It sounds like something dreamt up by a science fiction writer, but scientists have created a walking ‘bio-bot’ made from rat heart cells and hydrogels, using a 3-D printer. The biological machines are 7 millimetres long, and resemble a miniature springboard with one long, thin leg that is supported by a stouter supporting leg. The [...]... Read more »

Chan, V., Park, K., Collens, M., Kong, H., Saif, T., & Bashir, R. (2012) Development of Miniaturized Walking Biological Machines. Scientific Reports. DOI: 10.1038/srep00857  

  • November 16, 2012
  • 08:56 AM
  • 411 views

Airships: The Future of Air Travel?

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Considering the fact that airships have been around for a while now, it’s hard to believe that they are thought of as emerging technologies today. But that’s exactly the case given recent advances in this arena. Hydrogen airships have a troubled history due to several significant historical disasters. However, new technologies could help reduce this [...]... Read more »

Michele Trancossi, Antonio Dumas, Mauro Madonia, Jose Pascoa, & Dean Vucinic. (2012) Fire-safe Airship System Design. SAE Int. J. Aerosp. , 11-21. info:/10.4271/2012-01-1512

  • November 12, 2012
  • 06:54 AM
  • 522 views

CERN collider could be world’s fastest stopwatch

by Flora Malein in floramalein.com

The clock would keep time based on extremely short light pulses given out when ‘heavy ions’, nuclei that belong to heavy atoms such as lead, are smashed together at speed within the collider. To read more click here. Sources:  Ipp, A., & Somkuti, P. (2012). Yoctosecond Metrology Through Hanbury Brown–Twiss Correlations from a Quark-Gluon Plasma [...]... Read more »

  • November 11, 2012
  • 08:51 PM
  • 714 views

Cut your brain some SLACK

by TheCellularScale in The Cellular Scale

Action potentials are the main means of communication between neurons, and their exact timing can be really important. But the specific timing of action potentials is really important in the auditory system, because the auditory system encodes (among other things) information about sound wave frequency. Sound waves (source)I've previously written about auditory processing with regards to the wonder that is the chicken brain, but today we will focus on timing-specificity in the mammalian br........ Read more »

Yang B, Desai R, & Kaczmarek LK. (2007) Slack and Slick K(Na) channels regulate the accuracy of timing of auditory neurons. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 27(10), 2617-27. PMID: 17344399  

  • November 7, 2012
  • 10:10 AM
  • 877 views

Political Animals

by Miss Behavior in The Scorpion and the Frog

Now that we are finally on the other side of one of the longest, most expensive political campaign seasons of United States history, we find ourselves with a new mixed-bag of leaders. Our nation’s decision-makers include career politicians and new freshman politicians; they include lawyers, military members, doctors, businessmen, farmers, ministers, educators, scientists, pilots, and entertainers; they include Protestants, Catholics, Jews, Quakers, Mormons, Buddhists and Muslims; they include ........ Read more »

  • October 29, 2012
  • 11:00 AM
  • 715 views

Can the domains of Music Cognition and Music Information Retrieval inform each other?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

In about a weeks time the 13th ISMIR (International Society for Music Information Retrieval) conference will be held. This is a conference on the processing, searching, organizing and accessing music-related data. It attracts a research community that is intrigued by the revolution in music distribution and storage brought about by digital technology which generated quite some research activity and interest in academia as well as in industry.... Read more »

Aucouturier, J., & Bigand, E. (2012) Mel Cepstrum . Proc. of the 13th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference, 397-402. info:/

Volk. A., & Honingh, A. (eds). (2012) Mathematical and Computational Approaches to Music: Three Methodological Reflections . Journal of Mathematics and Music, 6(2). info:/10.1080/17459737.2012.704154

  • October 28, 2012
  • 03:56 AM
  • 1,173 views

Jumping Dynamics of a Simple Robot

by Ajinkya Kamat in Brilliance Ardent



Robots fascinate all of us. While few robots are just fun toys many other robots can perform many complex tasks for us. In past decade the field of robotics has advanced by leaps and bounces making robots smarter and smarter. We have created robots, which can explore terrains- terrestrial as well as extra-terrestrial-, where even humans haven't reached. To traverse a terrain with obstacles ... Read more »

Aguilar, J., Lesov, A., Wiesenfeld, K., & Goldman, D. (2012) Lift-Off Dynamics in a Simple Jumping Robot. Physical Review Letters, 109(17). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.174301  

  • October 27, 2012
  • 04:49 AM
  • 500 views

Is fMRI About To Get Fifty Times Faster?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

According to a paper just published, a new technique of functional MRI scanning (fMRI) could soon allow neuroscientists to measure brain activity far faster: Generalized iNverse imaging (GIN): Ultrafast fMRI with physiological noise correctionAuthors Boyacioglu and Barth claim remarkable things for the technique:We find that the spatial localization of activation for GIN is comparable to an EPI protocol and that maximum z-scores increase significantly... with a high temporal resolution of 50 mil........ Read more »

Boyacioglu R, & Barth M. (2012) Generalized iNverse imaging (GIN): Ultrafast fMRI with physiological noise correction. Magnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of the Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID: 23097342  

  • October 25, 2012
  • 10:15 PM
  • 603 views

Ohtsuki-Nowak transform for replicator dynamics on random graphs

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

We have seen that the replicator equation can be a useful tool in understanding evolutionary games. We’ve already used it for a first look at perception and deception, and the cognitive cost of agency. However, the replicator equation comes with a number of inherent assumptions and limitations. The limitation Hisashi Ohtsuki and Martin Nowak wanted [...]... Read more »

Ohtsuki H, & Nowak MA. (2006) The replicator equation on graphs. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 243(1), 86-97. PMID: 16860343  

  • October 25, 2012
  • 02:53 PM
  • 852 views

Why You Should Reject the “Rejection Improves Impact” Meme

by caseybergman in I wish you'd made me angry earlier

Over the last two weeks, a meme has been making the rounds in the scientific twittersphere that goes something like “Rejection of a scientific manuscript improves its eventual impact”.  This idea is based a recent analysis of patterns of manuscript submission reported in Science by Calcagno et al., which has been actively touted in the [...]... Read more »

  • October 24, 2012
  • 07:03 AM
  • 421 views

Scientists Find New Method to Test Bridges’ Health: Listening to Them “Singing in the Rain”

by Jaime Menchén in United Academics

It might become the most efficient and cost-effective method to check if a bridge needs repairing: Just spray the bridge’s deck with water and record the sound. That way, according to researchers at the Brigham Young University, in the US, may be possible to detect delamination (separation of structural layers) in bridges.... Read more »

  • October 22, 2012
  • 06:24 AM
  • 548 views

Large-N gauge theories on the lattice

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

Today I have found on arXiv a very nice review about large-N gauge theories on the lattice (see here). The authors, Biagio Lucini and Marco Panero, are well-known experts on lattice gauge theories being this their main area of investigation. This review, to appear on Physics Report, gives a nice introduction to this approach to [...]... Read more »

Biagio Lucini, & Marco Panero. (2012) SU(N) gauge theories at large N. arXiv. arXiv: 1210.4997v1

Marco Frasca. (2008) Yang-Mills Propagators and QCD. Nuclear Physics B (Proc. Suppl.) 186 (2009) 260-263. arXiv: 0807.4299v2

D. Gomez Dumm, & N. N. Scoccola. (2004) Characteristics of the chiral phase transition in nonlocal quark models. Phys.Rev. C72 (2005) 014909. arXiv: hep-ph/0410262v2

Marco Frasca. (2011) Chiral symmetry in the low-energy limit of QCD at finite temperature. Phys. Rev. C 84, 055208 (2011). arXiv: 1105.5274v4

  • October 18, 2012
  • 10:42 AM
  • 854 views

Searching for Extraterrestrial Microbes

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Locating thermophiles in other parts of the universe could very well aid in the search for extraterrestrial life. Most people have agreed that if life is found among the stars, it will be microbial (at least in the near-term future). Many individuals have also suggested that intelligent life forms might very well be extinct in [...]... Read more »

  • October 18, 2012
  • 07:15 AM
  • 549 views

OneZoom: Zooming in on the tree of life

by gunnardw in The Beast, the Bard and the Bot

The evolution of life is often depicted in a tree-like fashion (although, at some places, it might be more like a web). This tree analog for life’s evolution is evident in a new project to visualize the evolutionary relationships of … Continue reading →... Read more »

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