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  • October 22, 2012
  • 06:24 AM
  • 537 views

Large-N gauge theories on the lattice

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

Today I have found on arXiv a very nice review about large-N gauge theories on the lattice (see here). The authors, Biagio Lucini and Marco Panero, are well-known experts on lattice gauge theories being this their main area of investigation. This review, to appear on Physics Report, gives a nice introduction to this approach to [...]... Read more »

Biagio Lucini, & Marco Panero. (2012) SU(N) gauge theories at large N. arXiv. arXiv: 1210.4997v1

Marco Frasca. (2008) Yang-Mills Propagators and QCD. Nuclear Physics B (Proc. Suppl.) 186 (2009) 260-263. arXiv: 0807.4299v2

D. Gomez Dumm, & N. N. Scoccola. (2004) Characteristics of the chiral phase transition in nonlocal quark models. Phys.Rev. C72 (2005) 014909. arXiv: hep-ph/0410262v2

Marco Frasca. (2011) Chiral symmetry in the low-energy limit of QCD at finite temperature. Phys. Rev. C 84, 055208 (2011). arXiv: 1105.5274v4

  • October 18, 2012
  • 10:42 AM
  • 819 views

Searching for Extraterrestrial Microbes

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Locating thermophiles in other parts of the universe could very well aid in the search for extraterrestrial life. Most people have agreed that if life is found among the stars, it will be microbial (at least in the near-term future). Many individuals have also suggested that intelligent life forms might very well be extinct in [...]... Read more »

  • October 18, 2012
  • 07:15 AM
  • 538 views

OneZoom: Zooming in on the tree of life

by gunnardw in The Beast, the Bard and the Bot

The evolution of life is often depicted in a tree-like fashion (although, at some places, it might be more like a web). This tree analog for life’s evolution is evident in a new project to visualize the evolutionary relationships of … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 15, 2012
  • 10:55 AM
  • 694 views

Using METI Satellites to Find E.T.

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Cellular networks are all the rage these days. A lot of people believe that mobile technologies will eventually replace desktops/laptops entirely. Regardless, they only work with terrestrial communications networks here on Earth. What if a similar network could be built beyond our planet? Considering that all electromagnetic radiation travels at the speed of light, the [...]... Read more »

  • October 14, 2012
  • 05:55 AM
  • 723 views

Citizen science and digital platforms: folding it all the way to outer space

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

ScienceRewired is a philanthropic initiative that aims to promote public engagement in science through digital and social technologies. Their mission is to aid non-technical science practitioners and the digital domain in working together, to look at science from new perspectives while helping educate and empower individuals to create significant positive change in the world. Their focus spreads across science education, science communication and citizen science initiatives – what’s not to........ Read more »

Hand Eric. (2010) Citizen science: People power. Nature, 466(7307), 687. DOI: 10.1038/466685a  

Khatib F., Cooper S., Tyka M. D., Xu K., Makedon I., Popovic Z., Baker D., & Players F. (2011) From the Cover: Algorithm discovery by protein folding game players. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(47), 18953. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1115898108  

Parsons Jeffrey, Lukyanenko Roman, & Wiersma Yolanda. (2011) Easier citizen science is better. Nature, 471(7336), 37. DOI: 10.1038/471037a  

  • October 12, 2012
  • 05:35 AM
  • 851 views

What's new in Music Cognition and the Cognitive Sciences?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Why should music be of interest to cognitive scientists, and what role does it play in human cognition? ... Read more »

Pearce, Marcus, & Rohrmeier, Martin. (2012) Music Cognition and the Cognitive Sciences. Topics in Cognitive Science, 4(4), 468-484. info:/10.1111/j.1756-8765.2012.01226.x

  • October 11, 2012
  • 10:14 PM
  • 486 views

Powering electronics with stretchable batteries

by Cath in Basal Science (BS) Clarified

Potential health monitors like this one made of interlocking nanofibres are great—it’s flexible and conforms to your body. But what you don’t usually see is how these monitors might be [...]... Read more »

Abhinav M. Gaikwad, Alla M. Zamarayeva, Jamesley Rousseau, Howie Chu, Irving Derin, & Daniel A Steingart. (2012) Highly Stretchable Alkaline Batteries Based on an Embedded Conductive Fabric. Advanced Materials. DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201329  

  • October 8, 2012
  • 01:30 PM
  • 614 views

What Types of Feedback Should Students Receive?

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

Throughout the school day there are hundreds of small reactions, judgments, and decisions that are tossed around in a student’s head. The question is, when, where, and how can students be given additional information that nudges these thoughts in directions that will lead to better learning outcomes... Read more »

Taminiau, E.M.C., Kester, L., Corbalan, G., Alessi, S.M., Moxnes, E., Gijselaers, W.H., Kirschner, P.A., & Van Merrienboer, J.J.G. (2012) Why advice on task selection may hamper learning in on-demand education. Computer in Human Behavior. DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2012.07.028  

  • October 5, 2012
  • 12:42 AM
  • 490 views

Technology Is Rapidly Lowering the Cost of Testing

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

People may view this as something for the good news/bad news file, but technology has quietly made it significantly easier to grade tests electronically. For example, a new paper in the Journal of Science Education and Technology highlights a system called “Eyegrade” : While most current solutions are based on expensive scanners, Eyegrade offers a [...]... Read more »

  • October 4, 2012
  • 03:50 PM
  • 529 views

A Microsyringe to Take the Pain out of Shots

by Hector Munoz in Microfluidic Future

Back when I was in sixth grade, I remember reading a little blurb in some science magazine at school that in the future we could receive shots via a method that would feel as soft as a banana peel. Although I’m now a champ at taking shots, it’s still not a bad idea. We’ve had transdermal patches (think nicotine and birth control) for some time now, but those release their medicine over a period of time. A syringe is capable of delivering a dose at once, and can take a biologica........ Read more »

  • October 1, 2012
  • 01:11 PM
  • 812 views

Does playing Solo or Vs make a Difference in Kinect or Wii? (Study)

by Stephen Yang in ExerGame Lab

If you thought yes, "you are correct Sir!" According to the current study, playing Xbox Kinect™ Reflex Ridge resulted in a 1 MET higher rating than Wii Sports Boxing, and playing multiplayer...

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  • October 1, 2012
  • 01:10 AM
  • 774 views

Does playing Solo or Vs make a Difference in Kinect or Wii? (Study)

by Stephen P. Yang, Ph.D. in ExerGame Lab

According to the current study, playing Xbox Kinect™ Reflex Ridge resulted in a 1 MET higher rating than Wii Sports Boxing, and playing multiplayer yielded a 0.5 MET increase compared to solo play... Read more »

  • September 26, 2012
  • 08:50 AM
  • 354 views

Fellows of the Wiki Society? The Royal Society in London experiments with Wikipedia

by Duncan Hull in O'Really?

Venerable and learned society experiments with wikipedia... Read more »

Wodak Shoshana J., Mietchen Daniel, Collings Andrew M., Russell Robert B., & Bourne Philip E. (2012) Topic Pages: PLoS Computational Biology Meets Wikipedia. PLoS Computational Biology, 8(3). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002446  

  • September 26, 2012
  • 01:38 AM
  • 803 views

Mirror, Mirror on the wall, Am I healthy after all?

by Aurametrix team in Health Technologies

Health gadgets continue to evolve in many forms and shapes - from something that fits in your pocket to something that is wearable or walkable. Everyday objects are turning into "Smart objects", building the foundation for the next version of the Internet. And it's not all smoke and mirrors. So let's talk about mirrors. Fairy tales and science fiction stories often pave the way to real world technology. Magic mirrors have been used in Snow White and Harry Potter's world. Now you can get one, too........ Read more »

  • September 22, 2012
  • 07:11 PM
  • 872 views

Quantum computers | Κβαντικοί υπολογιστές

by Perikis Livas in Tracing Knowledge

A research team led by Australian engineers has created the first working quantum bit based on a single atom in silicon, opening the way to ultra-powerful quantum computers of the future.

In a landmark paper published today in the journal Nature, the team describes how it was able to both read and write information using the spin, or magnetic orientation, of an electron bound to a single phosphorus atom embedded in a silicon chip.... Read more »

UNSW News, NATURE, Physics4u, Physicsgg, & Γούσια Πολυξένη. (2012) Quantum computers | Κβαντικοί υπολογιστές . Tracing Knowledge. info:/

  • September 22, 2012
  • 01:26 PM
  • 667 views

Can Video Games Teach Kids “Grit”?

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

KIPP’s character report card and Paul Tough’s new book have laudably placed an emphasis on how emotional skills and character traits (e.g. persistence, curiosity, optimism, etc.) influence a child’s academic trajectory. Yet the question remains, will our education system make a real effort to emphasize these new ideas, or will they join things like Carol [...]... Read more »

  • September 22, 2012
  • 11:02 AM
  • 928 views

OMG! An Open Molecule Generator!

by egonw in Chem-bla-ics

Earlier this week an important cheminformatics paper appeared in the Journal of Cheminformatics. It is about the Open Molecule Generator (see below for the paper). This was one important piece of functionality still missing from Open Source cheminformatics. This works uses the Chemistry Development Kit, and was written by Julio Peironcely.

The Analytical Biosciences' group of Prof. Hankemeier (and many others, including also Theo Reijmers) and funded by the Netherlands Metab........ Read more »

Julio E Peironcely, Miguel Rojas-Chertó, Davide Fichera, Theo Reijmers, Leon Coulier, Jean-Loup Faulon, & Thomas Hankemeier. (2012) OMG: open molecule generator. Journal of Cheminformatics, 21. DOI: 10.1186/1758-2946-4-21  

  • September 22, 2012
  • 08:00 AM
  • 638 views

New Caledonian crows reason about hidden causal agents

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

We have generally believed that animals are not capable of very complex thought, even though many species use tools and engage in other complex behaviors.

Even a bird brain appears to be capable of understanding things that are not visible may be affecting their environment.

This study looks at whether New Caledonian crows, that were caught just for this experiment, are capable of attributing actions to a hidden cause, when they see that possible cause come and go.... Read more »

  • September 17, 2012
  • 10:30 PM
  • 864 views

How to Build a Neuron: Shortcuts

by TheCellularScale in The Cellular Scale

So you want to build a neuron, but don't have the time to fill and stain it, digitally reconstruct it, or even to knit one. Knitting Neuroscience from Knit a Neuron Well you are in luck because a lot of scientists have collected a lot of data already and some of them are even willing to openly share their work.  While it is great that people are willing to share their data, that willingness alone is not enough to actually make the data widely accessible (or searchable for that mat........ Read more »

  • September 13, 2012
  • 08:59 PM
  • 419 views

This is your brain on implants (spoiler: it’s better)

by aimee in misc.ience

Today, the Journal of Neural Engineering published rather an interesting paper. In it, they showed that they had been able to restore (and in some cases, improve) decision-making ability in primates through the use of an implanted prosthetic. Sounds like something out of science fiction, doesn’t it?     The region of the brain responsible [...]

[Click on the hyperlinked headline for more of the goodness]... Read more »

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