Post List

Geosciences posts

(Modify Search »)

  • June 3, 2011
  • 12:22 AM
  • 2,046 views

Countdown to extinction!

by John Carroll in Chronicles of Zostera


One of my favorite Megadeth albums and songs, although that’s for another time.  The title also fits for a handful of species from a  group particularly close to my heart – seagrasses.  Seagrasses made the news recently, as a recent report suggest as many as 10 of the 72 known seagrass species are at risk of . . . → Read More: Countdown to extinction!... Read more »

Short, FT, Polidoro, B, Livingstone, SR, Carpenter, KE, Bandeira, S, Bujang, JS, Calumpong, HP, Carruthers, TJB, Coles, RG, Dennison, WC.... (2011) Extinction risk assessment of the world's seagrass species. Biological Conservation. info:/10.1016/j.biocon.2011.04.010

ORTH, R., CARRUTHERS, T., DENNISON, W., DUARTE, C., FOURQUREAN, J., HECK, K., HUGHES, A., KENDRICK, G., KENWORTHY, W., OLYARNIK, S.... (2006) A Global Crisis for Seagrass Ecosystems. BioScience, 56(12), 987. DOI: 10.1641/0006-3568(2006)56[987:AGCFSE]2.0.CO;2  

  • June 1, 2011
  • 11:00 AM
  • 1,991 views

KRAKEN Day: Giant Squid = Awesomesauce

by Archie Teuthis in Deep Sea News

To get you ready for the awesomesauce that is KRAKEN Day(!!), it is only appropriate to open with Dr. M’s Epic giant squid post from earlier this year. Enjoy —————————————— In the following post I will enumerate the many ways in which current science repeatedly demonstrates that giant squids are awesomesauce. Awesome: (adj) . . . → Read More: KRAKEN Day: Giant Squid = Awesomesauce... Read more »

K. S. BOLSTAD, & S. O’SHEA. (2004) Gut contents of a giant squid Architeuthis dux (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida) from New Zealand waters. Bolstad , 15-21. info:/

Roeleveld, M. (2000) Giant squid beaks: implications for systematics. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the UK, 80(1), 185-187. DOI: 10.1017/S0025315499001769  

  • May 31, 2011
  • 04:53 PM
  • 1,394 views

Bioarchaeology of Roman Seafood Consumption

by Kristina Killgrove in Powered By Osteons

How much seafood did the Romans eat, and how does imported seafood affect our understanding of their origins?... Read more »

C. Beltrame, D. Gaddi, & S. Parizzi. (2011) A presumed hydraulic apparatus for the transport of live fish, found on the Roman wreck at Grado, Italy. International Journal of Nautical Archaeology. info:/10.1111/j.1095-9270.2011.00317.x

  • May 31, 2011
  • 04:26 PM
  • 887 views

After canals go in, fish diversity goes up… many millenia from now

by Maria José Viñas in GeoSpace

Facing a growing population and increasing demands for fresh water, India is hoping that an engineering fix will help solve its water-scarcity problems. The country’s National Water Development Agency has begun work on the first of a system of 30 canals that would link 46 rivers, in a process known as inter-basin water transfer.... Read more »

Lynch, H., Campbell Grant, E., Muneepeerakul, R., Arunachalam, M., Rodriguez-Iturbe, I., & Fagan, W. (2011) How restructuring river connectivity changes freshwater fish biodiversity and biogeography. Water Resources Research, 47(5). DOI: 10.1029/2010WR010330  

  • May 31, 2011
  • 11:53 AM
  • 1,322 views

Stressed Lemurs and Grass-Eating Humans

by Laelaps in Laelaps

In his 1960 presidential address to the South African Archaeological Society, the anthropologist Louis Leakey cast the fossil humans that had been found in that country as little more than a collection of evolutionary dead-ends. Leakey didn’t put it quite like that – that would have been rude – but he did utilize the platform [...]... Read more »

Cerling, T., Mbua, E., Kirera, F., Manthi, F., Grine, F., Leakey, M., Sponheimer, M., & Uno, K. (2011) Diet of Paranthropus boisei in the early Pleistocene of East Africa. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1104627108  

Leakey, L. (1961) Africa's Contribution to the Evolution of Man. The South African Archaeological Bulletin, 16(61), 3. DOI: 10.2307/3887411  

  • May 30, 2011
  • 12:04 AM
  • 1,170 views

The Rise of Animals

by Marc in Teaching Biology

Part 2 of a 6-talk series on the history of life on Earth I held in Cyprus.

At the end of the Proterozoic, from ~700 to 535.1 million years ago, a unique ecosystem developed inhabited by what is known as the Ediacaran Biota. The affinities of most of these organisms (if they are even organisms!) will always be disputed, but it is relatively sure that among sponges and jellyfish, the direct ancestors of the animal phyla we know today were lurking among them.

The start of the next period, th........ Read more »

  • May 28, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,889 views

Who’s your daddy?

by Alistair Dove in Deep Sea News

Jenny Schmidt from U. Illinois and her co-authors have uncovered a fascinating nugget of biology of the whale shark in a recent (and Open Access – w00t!) paper in Endangered Species Research.  In it, they continue the analysis of embryos collected from a heavily pregnant female first reported by Joung et al. (1996) . . . → Read More: Who’s your daddy?... Read more »

Schmidt, J., Chen, C., Sheikh, S., Meekan, M., Norman, B., & Joung, S. (2010) Paternity analysis in a litter of whale shark embryos. Endangered Species Research, 12(2), 117-124. DOI: 10.3354/esr00300  

  • May 28, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,058 views

Who’s your daddy?

by Alistair Dove in Deep Type Flow

Jenny Schmidt from U. Illinois and her co-authors have uncovered a fascinating nugget of biology of the whale shark in a recent (and Open Access – w00t!) paper in Endangered Species Research.  In it, they continue the analysis of embryos collected from a heavily pregnant female first reported by Joung et al. (1996) in . . . → Read More: Who’s your daddy?... Read more »

Schmidt, J., Chen, C., Sheikh, S., Meekan, M., Norman, B., & Joung, S. (2010) Paternity analysis in a litter of whale shark embryos. Endangered Species Research, 12(2), 117-124. DOI: 10.3354/esr00300  

  • May 27, 2011
  • 01:12 PM
  • 1,900 views

Bacteria in the sky, making it rain, snow, and hail

by Chris Rowan in Highly Allochthonous

Even though we all think of the freezing point of water as 0 °C, very pure water remains a liquid until about -40 °C. Water crystallizes to ice in the presence of tiny nucleation particles in the atmosphere. These particles … Continue reading →... Read more »

Christner, B., Morris, C., Foreman, C., Cai, R., & Sands, D. (2008) Ubiquity of Biological Ice Nucleators in Snowfall. Science, 319(5867), 1214-1214. DOI: 10.1126/science.1149757  

Pöschl U, Martin ST, Sinha B, Chen Q, Gunthe SS, Huffman JA, Borrmann S, Farmer DK, Garland RM, Helas G.... (2010) Rainforest aerosols as biogenic nuclei of clouds and precipitation in the Amazon. Science (New York, N.Y.), 329(5998), 1513-6. PMID: 20847268  

  • May 27, 2011
  • 01:11 AM
  • 1,189 views

The Origin of Life and of the Atmosphere

by Marc in Teaching Biology

Part 1 of a 6-talk series on the history of life on Earth I held in Cyprus.

In this talk, what we know about the early Earth’s geology and atmosphere will be reviewed, using that knowledge as the base on which to discuss the two main hypotheses about how life originated.

This will lead on to a discussion of the earliest life forms on Earth and how they revolutionised atmospheric and oceanic chemistry and forever changed the course of evolution on Earth.... Read more »

  • May 24, 2011
  • 08:24 PM
  • 2,441 views

Mescalerolemur: It Came From the Devil’s Graveyard

by Laelaps in Laelaps

Two years ago, a bombastic media event proclaimed that paleontologists had finally found “The Link” to our early primate ancestry. Dubbed Darwinius masillae – and affectionately nicknamed “Ida” – the lemur-like creature was represented by the most exquisite primate fossil ever found. Yet this petrified media darling was not all she seemed. Contrary to all [...]... Read more »

  • May 23, 2011
  • 08:31 AM
  • 822 views

Earthquake prediction: fact or fiction?

by Michael Jones in Elements Science

Accurate prediction of hazards saves millions of lives and billions of dollars each year, but as Michael Jones reports, this isn’t always easy.



Related posts:Podcast: Incoming Meteorites and Oil Drama
... Read more »

  • May 22, 2011
  • 03:46 PM
  • 1,579 views

Rare Earth Revelry #5: Fission and neutron capture products

by Lab Lemming in Lounge of the Lab Lemming

With interest in the Fukishima reactor disaster decaying at an exponential rate, I thought it would be an opportune time to take the long view of this phenomenon, and consider what sort of isotopic anomalies are left behind billions of years after an uncontained uranium fission reactor. And the best place to find these, of course, is Gabon.Gabon is not known for its nuclear ambitions or ... Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 10:28 PM
  • 1,675 views

On the Reasons Why We Need A New Supereon

by Dr. M in Deep Sea News

The largest unit of defined geologic time is the supereon. Only one is defined, the Precambrian spanning from the formation of the Earth to right before life goes crazy in the Cambrian explosion (4.6 billion years ago to 542 million years ago).  Oddly, there is no other supereon after the Precambrian, just the . . . → Read More: On the Reasons Why We Need A New Supereon... Read more »

KOWALEWSKI, M., PAYNE, J., SMITH, F., WANG, S., MCSHEA, D., XIAO, S., NOVACK-GOTTSHALL, P., MCCLAIN, C., KRAUSE, R., BOYER, A.... (2011) THE GEOZOIC SUPEREON. PALAIOS, 26(5), 251-255. DOI: 10.2110/palo.2011.S03  

  • May 19, 2011
  • 03:10 PM
  • 2,235 views

Levees and the illusion of flood control

by Chris Rowan in Highly Allochthonous

Levees have their uses in protecting communities from flooding - but they also create the illusion of safety that promotes further settlement and development of floodplain lands. Continue reading →... Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 01:06 PM
  • 1,488 views

Repost: It’s just a little pre-digested – it’s still good, it’s still good!

by Laelaps in Laelaps

[Author's note: I had no idea that getting my new apartment hooked up to the internet would be so difficult. Curse you, Comcast! I have been running to the local coffeeshop every morning to keep up with my correspondence and writing duties, and, combined with unpacking, I am in near-constant motion. With any luck, I'll [...]... Read more »

VANGEEL, B., APTROOT, A., BAITTINGER, C., BIRKS, H., BULL, I., CROSS, H., EVERSHED, R., GRAVENDEEL, B., KOMPANJE, E., & KUPERUS, P. (2008) The ecological implications of a Yakutian mammoth's last meal. Quaternary Research, 69(3), 361-376. DOI: 10.1016/j.yqres.2008.02.004  

van Geel, B., Guthrie, R., Altmann, J., Broekens, P., Bull, I., Gill, F., Jansen, B., Nieman, A., & Gravendeel, B. (2010) Mycological evidence of coprophagy from the feces of an Alaskan Late Glacial mammoth. Quaternary Science Reviews. DOI: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2010.03.008  

  • May 19, 2011
  • 10:22 AM
  • 1,874 views

A bunch of hot heads

by Alistair Dove in Deep Sea News

Driving through more remote parts of the Australian countryside when I was a young tacker, my Dad would often stop the old Mazda Capella so that we kids could investigate some reptilian thing warming itself on the black road surface; it was usually a fat shingleback or bombastic blue tongue, but sometimes a . . . → Read More: A bunch of hot heads... Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 10:22 AM
  • 955 views

A bunch of hot heads

by Alistair Dove in Deep Type Flow

Driving through more remote parts of the Australian countryside when I was a young tacker, my Dad would often stop the old Mazda Capella so that we kids could investigate some reptilian thing warming itself on the black road surface; it was usually a fat shingleback or bombastic blue tongue, but sometimes a lovely . . . → Read More: A bunch of hot heads... Read more »

  • May 18, 2011
  • 03:55 PM
  • 1,223 views

Phytoplankton Resiliency to the Chicxulub Mass Extinction

by Michael Long in Phased

Phytoplankton can rebound after nearly a century of dormancy in the dark, explaining why these microbes were resilient after the most recent global photosynthesis disruption and the accompanying mass extinction.... Read more »

  • May 17, 2011
  • 12:29 PM
  • 1,755 views

The Life of a Countertop Croc

by Laelaps in Laelaps

Why a raven is like a writing desk – the infamous riddle put forward by Lewis Carroll’s Mad Hatter – was meant to be an incomprehensible mystery, but a fortuitous discovery made half a century ago answers the un-asked question of how a crocodile is like a countertop.
Nodular limestone is beautiful. The sedimentary looks like [...]... Read more »

GANDOLA, R., BUFFETAUT, E., MONAGHAN, N., & DYKE, G. (2006) SALT GLANDS IN THE FOSSIL CROCODILE METRIORHYNCHUS. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 26(4), 1009-1010. DOI: 10.1671/0272-4634(2006)26[1009:SGITFC]2.0.CO;2  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.