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  • April 27, 2011
  • 08:14 PM
  • 1,359 views

In Life’s Race, Tapirs Took a Slow and Steady Pace

by Laelaps in Laelaps

Why are there tapirs in southeast Asia? They seem out of place. Out of the four living tapir species, three inhabit the lush forests of Central and South America, making the Malayan tapir of Myanmar, Thailand, and Sumatra a strange outlier.
Alfred Russel Wallace – the 19th century naturalist who independently developed the idea of evolution [...]... Read more »

DeSantis LRG, MacFadden B. (2007) Identifying forested environments in Deep Time using fossil tapirs: evidence from evolutionary morphology and stable isotopes. Cour Forsch Inst Senck, 147-157. info:/

  • April 27, 2011
  • 02:26 PM
  • 1,012 views

Pre-Columbian raised field agriculture: a review

by Umberto in Up and Down in Moxos

A new paper on raised field agriculture was published on line last week in the journal Ecological Engineering. The title, “Ecological engineers ahead of their time: The functioning of pre-Columbian raised-field agriculture and its potential contributions to sustainability today”, is a bit misleading. You would think it is just another paper claiming that the re-habilitation of raised field agriculture will provide means for sustainable, highly productive, flood/drought proof, politic........ Read more »

D. Renard, J. Iriarte, J.J. Birk, S. Rostain, B. Glaser, & D. McKey. (2011) Ecological engineers ahead of their time: The functioning of pre-Columbian raised-field agriculture and its potential contributions to sustainability today. Ecological Engineering. info:/

  • April 26, 2011
  • 07:27 PM
  • 1,743 views

Metagenomics: Transforming our understanding of oceans

by Holly Bik in Deep Sea News

If you’ve ever talked to me in person for more than 5 minutes, I’ve probably mentioned the !#$%*ING AWESOMENESS of high-throughput sequencing.  Frankly, I’m a bit obsessed.  If my life were an SAT analogy, it would be Dr Bik:Sequencing platforms as Teenage Girls:Twilight.  My gorgeous Illumina never sleeps (runs 2 weeks straight for . . . → Read More: Metagenomics: Transforming our understanding of oceans... Read more »

Gilbert, J., & Dupont, C. (2011) Microbial Metagenomics: Beyond the Genome. Annual Review of Marine Science, 3(1), 347-371. DOI: 10.1146/annurev-marine-120709-142811  

  • April 26, 2011
  • 06:02 PM
  • 1,346 views

Acts of God or Acts of Man?

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

Do we ever learn? How come we humans knowingly and willingly put ourselves and our critical infrastructure in harm's way time and again? Instead of living with and adjusting to natural hazards, we turn them into natural disasters, by our own doings and short-sighted decisions. [ ... ]... Read more »

Sieh, Kerry. (2000) Acts of God, Acts of Man: How Humans Turn Natural Hazards into Natural Disasters. Engineering and Science, 63(4), 8-17. info:other/

  • April 22, 2011
  • 12:05 PM
  • 1,423 views

The earth has music for those who listen

by Laelaps in Laelaps

As Stephen Jay Gould once put it, we have an earful of jaw. The small, sound-conducting bones of our inner ears – the incus, malleus, and stapes – got their start as jaw bones in our distant ancestors, and the modification of bits of jaw into intricate ear components is one of the classic examples [...]... Read more »

  • April 22, 2011
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,011 views

Tides & Earthquakes

by Mika McKinnon in GeoMika

A literature review of studies concerning of tidal pull triggering earthquakes.... Read more »

Emter, D. (1997) Tidal triggering of earthquakes and volcanic events. Tidal Phenomena, 293-309. info:/10.1007/BFb0011468

Heaton, T. (1975) Tidal Triggering of Earthquakes. Geophysical Journal International, 43(2), 307-326. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.1975.tb00637.x  

Heaton, T. H. (1982) Tidal triggering of earthquakes. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 72(6A), 2181-2200. info:/

Shlien, S. (1972) Earthquake-Tide Correlation. Geophysical Journal International, 28(1), 27-34. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.1972.tb06108.x  

  • April 21, 2011
  • 05:55 PM
  • 1,344 views

The Oldest Toothache

by Laelaps in Laelaps

Edward Drinker Cope was not exactly known for his sunny disposition. One of the key players in the “Bone Wars” of the late 19th century, his long-running feud with fellow bone sharp Othniel Charles Marsh is the stuff of scientific legend. The two former friends tussled over everything from fossil sites to the naming rights [...]... Read more »

  • April 19, 2011
  • 10:40 AM
  • 1,620 views

Just When You Thought Velociraptor Couldn’t Get Scarier

by Brian Switek in Dinosaur Tracking

Randall Munroe, the creator of the webcomic XKCD, isn’t going to like this one bit. Fear of attack by Velociraptor is a running theme in the science-themed series—lazy computer programmers should be especially wary—and two separate discoveries announced last week gave those with a phobia of raptors good reason to barricade the doors and windows. [...]... Read more »

  • April 19, 2011
  • 10:07 AM
  • 1,494 views

Scientist in Residence: My ‘Seascape of Fear’

by Kevin Zelnio in Deep Sea News

Eric Heupel is a graduate student at University of Connecticut in Oceanography. He keeps a personal blog at Eclectic Echoes and Larval Images, and used to part of The Other 95% team along with me before we closed shop. You can find Eric tweeting as @eclecticechoes. —————————————————- Hey folks, Kevin asked me to . . . → Read More: Scientist in Residence: My ‘Seascape of Fear’... Read more »

  • April 19, 2011
  • 10:07 AM
  • 1,271 views

Scientist in Residence: My ‘Seascape of Fear’

by Alistair Dove in Deep Type Flow

Eric Heupel is a graduate student at University of Connecticut in Oceanography. He keeps a personal blog at Eclectic Echoes and Larval Images, and used to part of The Other 95% team along with me before we closed shop. You can find Eric tweeting as @eclecticechoes. —————————————————- Hey folks, Kevin asked me to . . . → Read More: Scientist in Residence: My ‘Seascape of Fear’... Read more »

  • April 17, 2011
  • 10:22 PM
  • 1,150 views

Stretching the truth: vertical exaggeration of seismic data

by Zoltan Sylvester in Hindered Settling

If someone showed a photograph of the famous Cuernos massif (Torres del Paine National Park, Chile) like the one below, it would be - probably, hopefully - obvious to everybody that something is wrong with the picture. Our eyes and brains have seen enough mountain scenery that we intuitively know how steep is 'steep' in alpine landscapes. The peaks in this photograph just look too extreme, too high if one takes into account their lateral extent.The Cuernos in Torres del Paine National Park, Chil........ Read more »

  • April 17, 2011
  • 12:39 AM
  • 1,431 views

Whale Bone-Devouring Worm Into More Than Just Whales

by Kevin Zelnio in Deep Sea News

We have a long history of being HUGE fans of the “bone-devouring zombie worm from hell”. Osedax species were described less than 10 years ago and much work on their reproduction, evolution and ecology has yielded incredible insights into a unique and bizarre way of life! Early on, Osedax was only found on . . . → Read More: Whale Bone-Devouring Worm Into More Than Just Whales... Read more »

Glover AG, Kemp KM, Smith CR, & Dahlgren TG. (2008) On the role of bone-eating worms in the degradation of marine vertebrate remains. Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society, 275(1646), 1959-1961. PMID: 18505721  

Jones WJ, Johnson SB, Rouse GW, & Vrijenhoek RC. (2008) Marine worms (genus Osedax) colonize cow bones. Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society, 275(1633), 387-391. PMID: 18077256  

Rouse GW, Goffredi SK, Johnson SB, & Vrijenhoek RC. (2011) Not whale-fall specialists, Osedax worms also consume fishbones. Biology letters. PMID: 21490008  

Vrijenhoek, R., Collins, P., & Van Dover, C. (2008) Bone-eating marine worms: habitat specialists or generalists?. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 275(1646), 1963-1964. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2008.0350  

  • April 16, 2011
  • 12:02 AM
  • 1,414 views

Citing versioned papers, robots and reviewers?

by Daniel Mietchen in Research Cycle Research

Established scholarly citation practices are tailored towards static documents. With the use of versioned documents spreading, citation formats have to follow suit. This requires to balance the need for proper identification of the source of a claim with the demands for cited information being up to date. Getting this right is particularly important in naturally versioned environments like wikis or GitHub. Continue reading →... Read more »

  • April 14, 2011
  • 03:07 PM
  • 1,568 views

Mountain Dwarfs & Earthquakes

by Cris Campbell in Genealogy of Religion

Before there were materialist explanations of nature’s unpredictable fury, there were stories. These stories were not mere entertainment, but were attempts to make sense of that which was inexplicable. The world is of course an unpredictable place. We were powerfully reminded of this but one month ago, as an earthquake and tsunami devastated Japan.
Modern Japanese [...]... Read more »

Cruikshank, Julie. (1992) Invention of Anthropology in British Columbia's Supreme Court: Oral Tradition as Evidence in Delgamuukw v. B.C. BC Studies, 25-42. info:other/

  • April 14, 2011
  • 11:01 AM
  • 1,310 views

Birds Inherited Strong Sense of Smell From Dinosaurs

by Brian Switek in Dinosaur Tracking

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22Qup626DTc Feathers, air sacs, nesting behavior—the earliest birds owed a lot to their dinosaurian ancestors. The first birds also inherited a strong sense of smell. Modern birds have not been thought of as excellent scent-detectors, save for some super-smellers such as turkey vultures, which detect the scent of rotting carcasses. We typically think of avians [...]... Read more »

Zelenitsky, D., Therrien, F., Ridgely, R., McGee, A., & Witmer, L. (2011) Evolution of olfaction in non-avian theropod dinosaurs and birds. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2011.0238  

  • April 14, 2011
  • 06:56 AM
  • 1,075 views

Structural geology in Cabo Peñas (Asturias, Spain). Part I

by Jorge in StructuralGeology.org

The NW of the Iberian Peninsula is a remanent of the doubly vergent Hercynian Orogen (see figure attached), formed during the Devonian-Carboniferous time by the collision of Laurussia (or Euramerica) with Gondwana, forming Pangaea.
In this article I want to show you some pictures we did in the Bay of Llumeres.... Read more »

Manuel Julivert. (1976) La estructura de la región del cabo Peñas. Trabajos de Geología, 203-309. info:other/

  • April 13, 2011
  • 10:14 PM
  • 1,486 views

A Southerner Relays Tales of Ship Wrecks and Worms

by Dr. M in Deep Sea News

Dear Readers, Mint Julep In the summer of ‘06 I, a Southern gentleman in my finest white linen suit*, find myself in the lower portion of England.  The heat smothers me.  Now if I found myself in the land of Delta Blues, I would quench my thirst with a mint julep.  But alas, . . . → Read More: A Southerner Relays Tales of Ship Wrecks and Worms... Read more »

  • April 13, 2011
  • 10:14 PM
  • 1,568 views

A Southerner Relays Tales of Ship Wrecks and Worms

by Alistair Dove in Deep Type Flow

Dear Readers, Mint Julep In the summer of ‘06 I, a Southern gentleman in my finest white linen suit*, find myself in the lower portion of England.  The heat smothers me.  Now if I found myself in the land of Delta Blues, I would quench my thirst with a mint julep.  But alas, . . . → Read More: A Southerner Relays Tales of Ship Wrecks and Worms... Read more »

  • April 13, 2011
  • 10:07 AM
  • 1,548 views

Daemonosaurus Shakes Up the Early History of Dinosaurs

by Brian Switek in Dinosaur Tracking

Evolution is not a constant march of onward-and-upward progress. Any organism is a mosaic of the ancient and the modern—old features can be modified and put to new uses over time—and the mechanism of natural selection accounts for both an apparent lack of change and dramatic evolutionary transformations. There is no driving force towards perfection, [...]... Read more »

Sues, H.; Nesbitt, S.; Berman, D.; Henrici, A. (2011) A late-surviving basal theropod dinosaur from the latest Triassic of North America. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 1-6. info:/10.1098/rspb.2011.0410

  • April 12, 2011
  • 01:32 PM
  • 1,409 views

The Deep History of Dinosaur Lice

by Brian Switek in Dinosaur Tracking

Hunting dinosaurs is a dangerous business. Scores of fictional, time-traveling hunters have learned this lesson the hard way, but arguably the most unfortunate was the protagonist of Brian Aldiss’ short story “Poor Little Warrior.” All Claude Ford wanted to do was get away from his disappointing life and unhappy marriage by gunning down prehistoric monsters. [...]... Read more »

DALGLEISH, R., PALMA, R., PRICE, R., & SMITH, V. (2006) Fossil lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) reconsidered. Systematic Entomology, 31(4), 648-651. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-3113.2006.00342.x  

Smith, V., Ford, T., Johnson, K., Johnson, P., Yoshizawa, K., & Light, J. (2011) Multiple lineages of lice pass through the K-Pg boundary. Biology Letters. DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2011.0105  

Wappler, T., Smith, V., & Dalgleish, R. (2004) Scratching an ancient itch: an Eocene bird louse fossil. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 271(Suppl_5). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2003.0158  

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