Post List

  • March 31, 2015
  • 11:45 PM
  • 13 views

Operationalizing the local environment for replicator dynamics

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Recently, Jake Taylor-King arrived in Tampa and last week we were brainstorming some projects to work on together. In the process, I dug up an old idea I’ve been playing with as my understanding of the Ohtsuki-Nowak transform matured. The basic goal is to work towards an operational account of spatial structure without having to […]... Read more »

Ohtsuki, H., & Nowak, M. (2006) The replicator equation on graphs. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 243(1), 86-97. DOI: 10.1016/j.jtbi.2006.06.004  

  • March 31, 2015
  • 08:55 PM
  • 13 views

More Dialysis Patients Becoming Pregnant

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Mala Sachdeva MD North Shore University Hospital, Long Island Jewish Medical Center Assistant Professor, Nephrology, Internal Medicine Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Sachdeva: The last … Continue reading →
The post More Dialysis Patients Becoming Pregnant appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr. Mala Sachdeva MD. (2015) More Dialysis Patients Becoming Pregnant. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 31, 2015
  • 08:26 PM
  • 12 views

Raw Milk Link To Higher Risk of Foodborne Illnesses

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Benjamin Davis BA CLF-Lerner Fellow at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: The Food and Drug Administration banned the inter-state … Continue reading →
The post Raw Milk Link To Higher Risk of Foodborne Illnesses appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Benjamin Davis BA. (2015) Raw Milk Link To Higher Risk of Foodborne Illnesses. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 31, 2015
  • 06:02 PM
  • 12 views

Possible New Chemotherapy Regimen For Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof Xi-Chun Hu, Department of Oncology Shanghai Medical College Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Prof. Hu: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is associated with higher … Continue reading →
The post Possible New Chemotherapy Regimen For Triple-Negative Breast Cancer appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Prof Xi-Chun Hu, Department of Oncology. (2015) Possible New Chemotherapy Regimen For Triple-Negative Breast Cancer. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 31, 2015
  • 04:58 PM
  • 18 views

An apple a day may keep the children away: Pesticides and sperm count

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Ever hear that old saying an apple a day keeps the Doctor away? Well it might have the right idea, just the wrong person. New research investigating the relationship between eating fruit and vegetables containing pesticide residues and the quality of men’s semen has shown a link with lower sperm counts and percentages of normally-formed sperm. So for people wanting children it may be time to rethink that produce.... Read more »

Y.H. Chiu et al. (2015) Fruit and vegetable intake and their pesticide residues in relation to semen quality among men from a fertility clinic. Human Reproduction. info:/10.1093/humrep/dev064

Hagai Levine, & Shanna H. Swan. (2015) Is dietary pesticide exposure related to semen quality? Positive evidence from men attending a fertility clinic. Human Reproduction. info:/10.1093/humrep/dev065

  • March 31, 2015
  • 04:23 PM
  • 19 views

Ovulation changes women’s desire for variety in products

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

We know that hormones affect who we are, even when we aren’t aware of it. In the past scientists have found that people who are hungry tend to buy more things, no surprise for those of us who have shopped hungry. However, new research shows that women seek a greater variety of products and services, specifically when they are ovulating.... Read more »

  • March 31, 2015
  • 04:19 PM
  • 17 views

Viruses and the Nucleolus: Coronavirus N, Cytokinesis and Autophagy

by thelonevirologist in Virology Tidbits

The nucleolus is a subnuclear structure not surrounded by a membrane, which is disassembled during mitosis and reformed during late telophase via the interaction of nucleolar proteins with loci of ribosomal DNA. At this point, the inhibition of CDK1 leads to the resumption of RNA Polymerase I (RNA Pol I) dependent transcription of rDNA, resulting in the expression of the pre-rRNA (18S, 5.8S, and 28S, with internal and external transcribed spacers) and the recruitment of the processing machinery, forming the prenucleolar bodies (PNBs) and subsequently processing factors as nucleoli mature.Here the localisation of viral proteins to the nucleolus is discussed with a focus on the coronaviral Nucleocapsid protein.... Read more »

Olson MO, Hingorani K, & Szebeni A. (2002) Conventional and nonconventional roles of the nucleolus. International review of cytology, 199-266. PMID: 12211630  

Leung, A., & Lamond, A. (2003) The Dynamics of the Nucleolus. Critical Reviews in Eukaryotic Gene Expression, 13(1), 39-54. DOI: 10.1615/CritRevEukaryotGeneExpr.v13.i1.40  

Shaw P, & Brown J. (2012) Nucleoli: composition, function, and dynamics. Plant physiology, 158(1), 44-51. PMID: 22082506  

Salvetti A, & Greco A. (2014) Viruses and the nucleolus: the fatal attraction. Biochimica et biophysica acta, 1842(6), 840-7. PMID: 24378568  

Hiscox JA. (2007) RNA viruses: hijacking the dynamic nucleolus. Nature reviews. Microbiology, 5(2), 119-27. PMID: 17224921  

Lochmann TL, Bann DV, Ryan EP, Beyer AR, Mao A, Cochrane A, & Parent LJ. (2013) NC-mediated nucleolar localization of retroviral gag proteins. Virus research, 171(2), 304-18. PMID: 23036987  

Haupt S, Stroganova T, Ryabov E, Kim SH, Fraser G, Duncan G, Mayo MA, Barker H, & Taliansky M. (2005) Nucleolar localization of potato leafroll virus capsid proteins. The Journal of general virology, 86(Pt 10), 2891-6. PMID: 16186245  

González I, Martínez L, Rakitina DV, Lewsey MG, Atencio FA, Llave C, Kalinina NO, Carr JP, Palukaitis P, & Canto T. (2010) Cucumber mosaic virus 2b protein subcellular targets and interactions: their significance to RNA silencing suppressor activity. Molecular plant-microbe interactions : MPMI, 23(3), 294-303. PMID: 20121451  

Boyne JR, & Whitehouse A. (2006) Nucleolar trafficking is essential for nuclear export of intronless herpesvirus mRNA. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 103(41), 15190-5. PMID: 17005724  

Callé A, Ugrinova I, Epstein AL, Bouvet P, Diaz JJ, & Greco A. (2008) Nucleolin is required for an efficient herpes simplex virus type 1 infection. Journal of virology, 82(10), 4762-73. PMID: 18321972  

Hiscox JA, Wurm T, Wilson L, Britton P, Cavanagh D, & Brooks G. (2001) The coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus nucleoprotein localizes to the nucleolus. Journal of virology, 75(1), 506-12. PMID: 11119619  

Kim JS, Ro SH, Kim M, Park HW, Semple IA, Park H, Cho US, Wang W, Guan KL, Karin M.... (2015) Sestrin2 inhibits mTORC1 through modulation of GATOR complexes. Scientific reports, 9502. PMID: 25819761  

Belaid A, Cerezo M, Chargui A, Corcelle-Termeau E, Pedeutour F, Giuliano S, Ilie M, Rubera I, Tauc M, Barale S.... (2013) Autophagy plays a critical role in the degradation of active RHOA, the control of cell cytokinesis, and genomic stability. Cancer research, 73(14), 4311-22. PMID: 23704209  

Zhang H, Shi X, Paddon H, Hampong M, Dai W, & Pelech S. (2004) B23/nucleophosmin serine 4 phosphorylation mediates mitotic functions of polo-like kinase 1. The Journal of biological chemistry, 279(34), 35726-34. PMID: 15190079  

Zhu Y, Zhao L, Liu L, Gao P, Tian W, Wang X, Jin H, Xu H, & Chen Q. (2010) Beclin 1 cleavage by caspase-3 inactivates autophagy and promotes apoptosis. Protein , 1(5), 468-77. PMID: 21203962  

  • March 31, 2015
  • 11:01 AM
  • 15 views

Moths Fondly Remember Plant Species Where They Lost Their Virginity

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Think real estate decisions are hard for humans? Imagine if the house you lived in were also your singles bar, your babies' nursery, and your shelter from large animals trying to eat you. And, while you were growing up, your food source, as you nibbled away its floors and shingles.

Moths face all these pressures each time they settle down on a plant. That may be why at least one type of moth uses pleasant associations to help with its choices. The plant species where an individual loses i... Read more »

  • March 31, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 18 views

Shields Up! Lay In A Course For Mars

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Deflector shields allowed Star Trek and other sci-fi franchises to have long space battles. Without them, one good strike and everyone was dead – that wouldn’t lend itself to sequels.

We don’t need shields for space battles yet, but we do need them to get to Mars. Cosmic radiation will kill or injure every astronaut unless we can deflect the radiation away from the spacecraft. We’re just about to build real deflectors, and our teachers are the magnetic fields we find on earth and the Moon.
... Read more »

  • March 31, 2015
  • 07:24 AM
  • 11 views

Pesticides In Fruits and Vegetables May Lower Sperm Count In Men

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jorge E. Chavarro, M.D., Sc.D. Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Assistant Professor of Medicine Harvard Medical School Boston, MA 02113 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? … Continue reading →
The post Pesticides In Fruits and Vegetables May Lower Sperm Count In Men appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Jorge E. Chavarro, M.D., Sc.D. (2015) Pesticides In Fruits and Vegetables May Lower Sperm Counts. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 31, 2015
  • 07:00 AM
  • 11 views

It’s Time To Stop Blaming the Moon For Hospital Admissions or Births

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Jean-Luc Margot PhD Professor, Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? … Continue reading →
The post It’s Time To Stop Blaming the Moon For Hospital Admissions or Births appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr. Jean-Luc Margot PhD. (2015) It's Time To Stop Blaming the Moon For Hospital Admissions or Births. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 31, 2015
  • 05:45 AM
  • 17 views

African-Americans Receive Heart Transplants at Hospitals With Poor Performance Track Records

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

About five million people in the US suffer from heart failure, and approximately half of them die within five years of being diagnosed. Only about 2,500 hundred people a year receive a heart transplant – the treatment of last resort. A new heart can be life-saving, but it is also life-changing. Even under the best conditions, the surgery is complex, and recovery carries a heavy physical and emotional burden.
... Read more »

  • March 31, 2015
  • 05:27 AM
  • 27 views

How time pressure improves decision making in emergency situations

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

A new simulation of a complex, realistic disaster event suggests that time pressure facilitates better decision-making among emergency responders. The two-day training exercise, overseen by Liverpool’s Centre for Critical and Major Incident Psychology, looked at the impact of a hypothetical aeroplane crash over a city. Nearly two hundred professionals were split into different rooms based on the agency they belonged to (14 agencies in all, including police, transport, health and science advisors), and each received realistic data according to their function.As casualty data trickled into the Ambulance Room, did this give a clue to the cause of the crash? Could terrorism be ruled out? Would the hospital suffer outages, given damage to a power station? These were some of the considerations the teams had to contend with.The researchers focused on six critical issues identified by a panel of experts as being key, and as emblematic of the wider challenge of the exercise as a whole: effective cross-agency collaboration.Results showed that when issues needed responses from more than two agencies, successful action was actually more likely when there was a sense of time pressure. When this was missing, communication efforts were squandered as workers gathered more and more information from within their agency, as opposed to coordinating decisions and actions with other agencies.Why did time pressure improve emergency responders’ decision making and communication? It has to do with the way that human beings avoid tough choices when we can – anticipated regret is a powerful deterrent. But imperfect decisions can actually be better than none: once initiated they can be monitored, evaluated and altered, whereas inaction begets inaction. In addition, a deferred decision may continue to eat up mental resources, making other decisions more difficult.Evidence from this new field of “naturalistic decision making” suggests that time pressure leads experts into accurate intuitive “pattern-matching”. The "natural state" of expert decision-making involves leaps between decision stages rather than examination of every possibility, and time pressure encourages these leaps (or pattern matches).One of the crisis issues – the handover of disaster management from emergency services to the local authority – had no clear deadlines attached. But in this case, the strategy unit had set the handover as a clear overarching goal, which led to more effective communication on this issue, including less in-agency discussion (less back-covering and abstract debate, perhaps), and more time engaging with other agencies. Even though the handover was required in the later recovery phase, the group were already planning and building contingencies during the initial response phase.The message for organisations, then, is that human beings are tempted to delay when it’s most vital to act, thanks to anticipated regret. This is "The Psychology of Doing Nothing".  Clearly articulated strategic goals are one way to stave this off. When it comes to time boundaries, the authors consider these "difficult to influence." But artificial deadlines, or making unstated ones more explicit, may be useful ways to keep the urgency in the emergency services._________________________________ Alison, L., Power, N., van den Heuvel, C., Humann, M., Palasinksi, M., & Crego, J. (2015). Decision inertia: Deciding between least worst outcomes in emergency responses to disasters Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology DOI: 10.1111/joop.12108 Post written by Alex Fradera (@alexfradera) for the BPS Research Digest.

... Read more »

Alison, L., Power, N., van den Heuvel, C., Humann, M., Palasinksi, M., & Crego, J. (2015) Decision inertia: Deciding between least worst outcomes in emergency responses to disasters. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology. DOI: 10.1111/joop.12108  

  • March 31, 2015
  • 05:23 AM
  • 17 views

Fixing 'leaky' blood vessels to combat severe respiratory ailments and, perhaps, Ebola

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

When you get an infection, your immune system responds with an influx of inflammatory cells that target the underlying bacteria or viruses. These immune cells migrate from your blood into the infected tissue in order to release a cocktail of pro-inflammatory proteins and help eliminate the infectious threat. During this inflammatory response, the blood vessel barrier becomes “leaky.” This allows for an even more rapid influx of additional immune cells. Once the infection resolves, the response cools off, the entry of immune cells gradually wanes and the integrity of the blood vessel barrier is restored.
... Read more »

Gong, H., Rehman, J., Tang, H., Wary, K., Mittal, M., Chatturvedi, P., Zhao, Y., Komorova, Y., Vogel, S., & Malik, A. (2015) HIF2α signaling inhibits adherens junctional disruption in acute lung injury. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 125(2), 652-664. DOI: 10.1172/JCI77701  

  • March 31, 2015
  • 05:03 AM
  • 39 views

How to improve memory five times in less than an hour?

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

You can enhance your memory nearly five times with the help of 45-60 minutes of sleep.

Published in:

Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

Study Further:

Memory is the power of retaining, remembering, and recalling past experiences and knowledge. Normally, new information moves away from the mind quite rapidly as we are prone to forget things. Every one of us wants to have a good memory. Researchers are working on new techniques to improve memory that may range from exercise to practice.

In a study, researchers have found that a power nap of less than one hour can help in improving the performance of memory by about five times. Researchers have found that a short sleep of 45-60 minutes can help in retaining the knowledge more than in the awaken state.

In the study, researchers worked on two groups of people. Both of those groups were shown unconnected pairs of words, and after showing those words, one group was asked to sleep and the other group watched a DVD. Researchers explained that the people in the group, who watched DVD, performed significantly worse than the other group, who was asked to go to sleep. People in this nap (sleep) group were able to retrieve information from memory that is five-fold better than the other group.

Brain (Credit: cblue98/Flickr)
Brain (Credit: cblue98/Flickr)

Researchers have also studied hippocampus, the part of the brain where new information is transferred for long-term memory. Moreover, they have studied brain activity, referred to as “sleep spindles”, which is considered important in memory consolidation during sleep and can be seen as a short burst of rapid oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Researchers are of opinion that previously entered information is probably consolidated during this type of brain activity. They concluded, “Together, these results speak for a selective beneficial impact of naps on hippocampus-dependent memories.”

Researchers are of opinion that a short sleep (nap) in school or during office hours could help in significantly improving the learning process.
Reference:

Studte, S., Bridger, E., & Mecklinger, A. (2015). Nap sleep preserves associative but not item memory performance Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 120, 84-93 DOI: 10.1016/j.nlm.2015.02.012... Read more »

Studte, S., Bridger, E., & Mecklinger, A. (2015) Nap sleep preserves associative but not item memory performance. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 84-93. DOI: 10.1016/j.nlm.2015.02.012  

  • March 31, 2015
  • 04:35 AM
  • 20 views

Is anhedonia a key component of depression comorbid to autism?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Anhedonia: the inability to experience pleasure from activities usually found enjoyable.Although by no means an expert on anhedonia (or much else), I believe that it is a concept quite important when it comes to making a diagnosis of depression although the precise hows and whys of connecting anhedonia to other symptoms are still the source of some discussion [1].The paper from Vicki Bitsika & Christopher Sharpley [2] brings the concepts of anhedonia and depression into view with autism in mind. Based on the analysis of self-reported symptoms on the "Depression subscale of the Child and Adolescent Symptoms Inventory (CASI-D)" for 70 males diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 50 asymptomatic controls matched for age, authors reported that: "The MDD [major depressive disorder] profiles for the ASD participants were dominated by anhedonia."Accepting that the label of autism seemingly very rarely exists in a diagnostic vacuum (see here) and that there is still some debate about whether comorbidity is just that or something rather more integral to parts of the growing pluralisation of autism (see here), the Bitsika/Sharpley paper is a potentially important one. Getting into the nitty-gritty details of how issues such as depression manifest on top of a diagnosis of autism is important as per the discussions by Vannucchi et al [3] (see here) on the "atypical presentation" of bipolar disorder with Asperger syndrome in mind. Knowing for example, that anhedonia might be more characteristic of MDD in cases of autism or even more centrally to autism [4], may offer not only a more detailed perspective on screening for and managing such issues as and when they occur, but also a little bit more detail about the mechanisms through which such symptoms may come about.Music: Mercury Rev - Goddess on a Highway.----------[1] Gaillard R. et al. Anhedonia in depression. Encephale. 2013 Sep;39(4):296-305.[2] Bitsika V. & Sharpley CF. Differences in the Prevalence, Severity and Symptom Profiles of Depression in Boys and Adolescents with an Autism Spectrum Disorder versus Normally Developing Controls. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education. 2015; 62: 158-167.[3] Vannucchi G. et al. Bipolar disorder in adults with Asperger׳s Syndrome: A systematic review. J Affect Disord. 2014 Jul 8;168C:151-160.[4] Chevallier C. et al. Brief report: Selective social anhedonia in high functioning autism. J Autism Dev Disord. 2012 Jul;42(7):1504-9.----------Bitsika, V., & Sharpley, C. (2015). Differences in the Prevalence, Severity and Symptom Profiles of Depression in Boys and Adolescents with an Autism Spectrum Disorder versus Normally Developing Controls International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 62 (2), 158-167 DOI: 10.1080/1034912X.2014.998179... Read more »

  • March 30, 2015
  • 08:27 PM
  • 29 views

Florida researchers find one in five college students may have misophonia – a hypersensitivity to sounds like lip smacking and pen clicking

by Megan Cartwright in Science-Based Writing

Almost one in five college students are so sensitive to common, annoying sounds like lip smacking and pen clicking that they may have misophonia—a little-understood condition where people overreact to irritating noises. The results come from a University of South … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • March 30, 2015
  • 08:26 PM
  • 10 views

Black HIV Patients Have Increased Mortality Even When Treated

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Catherine R. Lesko, MPH Department of Epidemiology UNC School of Global Public Health Chapel Hill, NC Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: There is a lot of evidence … Continue reading →
The post Black HIV+ Patients Have Increased Mortality Even When Treated appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Catherine R. Lesko, MPH. (2015) Black HIV Patients Have Increased Mortality Even When Treated. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 06:57 PM
  • 9 views

Kidney Stone Risk Affected By Age and Sex

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Majuran Perinpam, BsC Mayo Clinic Rochester, Minn MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? Response: The four key urinary factors: Calcium, magnesium, oxalate and uric acid are all implicated in kidney stone formation. Age and sex … Continue reading →
The post Kidney Stone Risk Affected By Age and Sex appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Majuran Perinpam, BsC. (2015) Kidney Stone Risk Affected By Age and Sex. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 05:42 PM
  • 32 views

Welcome to the wikipedia for neurons

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

While the brain might not have more connections than stars in the universe (sorry guys), it is still complex. In fact, someone I respect defined a neuroscientist as “someone who knows how little we know about the brain.” Despite the decades worth of data that has been collected about the billions of neurons in the brain, we still don’t know much. So to help scientists make sense of the vast amount of information we already collected, researchers used data mining to create neuroelectro.org, a publicly available website that acts like Wikipedia, indexing physiological information about neurons.... Read more »

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