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  • August 31, 2014
  • 11:31 PM
  • 40 views

August lives up to its definition: respected and impressive

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

The things we noticed in and around canine science over the past two weeks, Storified in one neat location for your convenience:[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [16-31 August 2014]" on Storify] Further reading:Feuerbacher E.N. (2014). Shut up and pet me! Domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) prefer petting to vocal praise in concurrent and single-alternative choice procedures, Behavioural Processes, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beproc.2014.08.019 Gygax L. (2014). The A to Z of sta........ Read more »

  • August 31, 2014
  • 05:20 PM
  • 45 views

Heroin’s Anthrax Problem

by Rebecca Kreston in BODY HORRORS

Anthrax is a deadly disease with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Because it is, thankfully, also quite rare, it is relatively easy to track its whereabouts and going-ons when an outbreak occurs. Typically, outbreaks of anthrax have been traced to groups of people involved in high-risk activities involving grazing animals and their byproducts: anthrax favors shepherds, butchers, wool-sorters, leather workers, and even the odd drum-playing hippies. In 2009, however, an outbreak upended this........ Read more »

  • August 24, 2014
  • 03:06 PM
  • 95 views

Correcting the Critics of Nicholas Wade & MAOA

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

Geneticists are not the leading experts on behavioral genetics, and they and other critics have made numerous errors and misjudgments about Nicholas Wade’s book A Troublesome Inheritance, as well as MAOA or warrior gene research.... Read more »

Bevilacqua L, Doly S, Kaprio J, Yuan Q, Tikkanen R, Paunio T, Zhou Z, Wedenoja J, Maroteaux L, Diaz S.... (2010) A population-specific HTR2B stop codon predisposes to severe impulsivity. Nature, 468(7327), 1061-6. PMID: 21179162  

Cases O, Seif I, Grimsby J, Gaspar P, Chen K, Pournin S, Müller U, Aguet M, Babinet C, & Shih JC. (1995) Aggressive behavior and altered amounts of brain serotonin and norepinephrine in mice lacking MAOA. Science (New York, N.Y.), 268(5218), 1763-6. PMID: 7792602  

Tuinier S, Verhoeven WMA, Scherders MJWT, Fekkes D, & Pepplinkhuizen L. (1995) Neuropsychiatric and biological characteristics of X-linked MAO-A deficiency syndrome. A single case intervention study. New Trends in Experimental and Clinical Psychiatry, 99-107. info:/

Zhu B, Chen C, Moyzis R, Dong Q, Chen C, He Q, Li J, Lei X, & Lin C. (2012) Association between the HTR2B gene and the personality trait of fun seeking. Personality and Individual Differences, 53(8), 1029-1033. DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2012.07.026  

  • August 21, 2014
  • 02:21 AM
  • 95 views

Do You Believe in Dog? A New Ball Game

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Hello Do You Believe in Dog(ers)!(source)After two years of mostly pen-pal style blogging, we're excited to share our new direction!When we first decided to create Do You Believe in Dog?, we committed to blogging back and forth about canine science for two years. We were able to celebrate achieving that goal at the recent 4th Canine Science Forum in Lincoln, UK and also reflect on the future of Do You Believe in Dog?The DYBID blog, Facebook and Twitter feeds have become vibrant places to ac........ Read more »

Fischhoff B., & Scheufele D. (2013) The science of science communication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(Supplement 3), 14033-14039. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1213273110  

  • August 20, 2014
  • 01:22 PM
  • 97 views

Agriculture, Inequality and Cremation in Iron Age Spain

by Katy Meyers in Bones Don't Lie

One of the major debates in archaeology is when do we begin to see inequality among human groups, and what caused this this to happen. Social inequality has been defined […]... Read more »

JORGE DE TORRES RODRÍGUEZ. (2014) A PLACE FOR EVERYONE. THE STRUCTURE OF ARROYO CULEBRO D CEMETERY AND THE SOCIAL ORGANIZATION IN THE MIDDLE TAGUS VALLEY IRON AGE (SPAIN). Oxford Journal of Archaeology. info:/

  • August 20, 2014
  • 10:07 AM
  • 97 views

How Humans Are Helping Ravens and Hurting Hawks

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

You’ve already picked a side in the bird wars, whether or not you know it. As humans carve up formerly empty expanses of the western United States with our roads, electrical towers, and power lines, we’re inadvertently giving a boost to ravens. Meanwhile, the birds of prey that once ruled the land are being left […]The post How Humans Are Helping Ravens and Hurting Hawks appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • August 12, 2014
  • 08:59 AM
  • 90 views

Why are the elderly invisible in archaeological contexts?

by Katy Meyers in Bones Don't Lie

For the past two months, I have been busy preparing my dissertation data for analysis. This means that I am taking the paper versions of my data from books, monographs, […]... Read more »

C. Cave, & M. Oxenham. (2014) Identification of the Archaeological ‘Invisible Elderly’: An Approach Illustrated with an Anglo-Saxon Example. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology. info:/

  • August 10, 2014
  • 05:18 AM
  • 132 views

Canine Science Forum 2014 - we come full circle!

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Aw - it's Us @ CSF2014! Thanks Tamás Faragó :)Dear Julie,while you've been off enjoying the fjords of Norway and I've been recovering from six legs of long haul flying with a three year old as hand luggage, I thought I'd put up a quick post to recap the wonderful week in Lincoln, UK that was the (Feline and) Canine Science Forum 2014.Such a fun, stimulating, inspiring week comprising the Feline Science day (Monday), public lecture by James Serpell (rhymes with purple) on Monday ........ Read more »

  • August 7, 2014
  • 08:00 PM
  • 148 views

Do Narcissists Know They’re Narcissists?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

According to a provocative paper just published, it’s possible to accurately determine how narcissistic someone is by asking them just one thing. Here’s the question in full: To what extent do you agree with this statement: I am a narcissist? (Note: The word ‘narcissist’ means egotistical, self-focused, and vain.) Answer on a scale from 1 […]The post Do Narcissists Know They’re Narcissists? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

  • August 5, 2014
  • 07:24 PM
  • 186 views

Sink-or-swim for international students

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

It is one of the basic findings of decades of research in bilingual education that language submersion is not a productive way to educate minority students. ‘Language submersion’ refers to a situation where students are made to study exclusively through … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 5, 2014
  • 10:51 AM
  • 105 views

Kids Name the Darnedest Animals

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

Here’s an experiment that’s easy to do on your own. Grab the nearest elementary- or middle-school-age kid, sit her down in a quiet place, and ask her to name everything she can think of that’s alive. The results might tell you a lot about your young subject’s life. The wilder the animals, the more domestic […]The post Kids Name the Darnedest Animals appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • August 4, 2014
  • 06:05 PM
  • 133 views

Do Sciences and Humanities Students’ Brains Differ?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Scholars on both sides of the science-humanities divide have been known to feel that their counterparts just don’t think in the same way. But could it be that their brains are actually different? Yes, it could, say Japanese neuroscientists Hikaru Takeuchi and colleagues, who have just published a paper about Brain structures in the sciences […]The post Do Sciences and Humanities Students’ Brains Differ? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Sekiguchi A, Nouchi R, Kotozaki Y, Nakagawa S, Miyauchi CM, Iizuka K, Yokoyama R, Shinada T.... (2014) Brain structures in the sciences and humanities. Brain structure . PMID: 25079346  

  • August 3, 2014
  • 04:11 PM
  • 174 views

The Alondra Oubré Academic Fraud Exposed

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

Two respected authors, Alondra Oubré and Massimo Pigliucci, are implicated in the academic fraud of taking false information from Wikipedia and falsely attributing it to a research database in order to fulminate against the conclusions of Nicholas Wade’s book, A Troublesome Inheritance, and the science of the warrior gene, monoamine oxidase A.... Read more »

Alia-Klein N, Goldstein RZ, Tomasi D, Woicik PA, Moeller SJ, Williams B, Craig IW, Telang F, Biegon A, Wang GJ.... (2009) Neural mechanisms of anger regulation as a function of genetic risk for violence. Emotion (Washington, D.C.), 9(3), 385-96. PMID: 19485616  

Buckholtz JW, Callicott JH, Kolachana B, Hariri AR, Goldberg TE, Genderson M, Egan MF, Mattay VS, Weinberger DR, & Meyer-Lindenberg A. (2008) Genetic variation in MAOA modulates ventromedial prefrontal circuitry mediating individual differences in human personality. Molecular psychiatry, 13(3), 313-24. PMID: 17519928  

Cerasa A, Cherubini A, Quattrone A, Gioia MC, Magariello A, Muglia M, Manna I, Assogna F, Caltagirone C, & Spalletta G. (2010) Morphological correlates of MAO A VNTR polymorphism: new evidence from cortical thickness measurement. Behavioural brain research, 211(1), 118-24. PMID: 20303364  

Fergusson DM, Boden JM, Horwood LJ, Miller A, & Kennedy MA. (2012) Moderating role of the MAOA genotype in antisocial behaviour. The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science, 200(2), 116-23. PMID: 22297589  

Gilad Y, Rosenberg S, Przeworski M, Lancet D, & Skorecki K. (2002) Evidence for positive selection and population structure at the human MAO-A gene. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 99(2), 862-7. PMID: 11805333  

Huang YY, Cate SP, Battistuzzi C, Oquendo MA, Brent D, & Mann JJ. (2004) An association between a functional polymorphism in the monoamine oxidase a gene promoter, impulsive traits and early abuse experiences. Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 29(8), 1498-505. PMID: 15150530  

Koen L, Kinnear C, Corfield V, Emsley R, Jordaan E, Keyter N, Moolman-Smook J, Stein D, & Niehaus D. (2004) Violence in male patients with schizophrenia: risk markers in a South African population. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 38(4), 254-259. DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1614.2004.01338.x  

Kunugi H, Ishida S, Kato T, Tatsumi M, Sakai T, Hattori M, Hirose T, & Nanko S. (1999) A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of monoamine oxidase-A gene and mood disorders. Molecular psychiatry, 4(4), 393-5. PMID: 10483059  

Lei H, Zhang X, Di X, Rao H, Ming Q, Zhang J, Guo X, Jiang Y, Gao Y, Yi J.... (2014) A Functional Polymorphism of the MAOA Gene Modulates Spontaneous Brain Activity in Pons. BioMed research international, 243280. PMID: 24971323  

Philibert RA, Gunter TD, Beach SR, Brody GH, & Madan A. (2008) MAOA methylation is associated with nicotine and alcohol dependence in women. American journal of medical genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric genetics : the official publication of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics, 147B(5), 565-70. PMID: 18454435  

Williams RB, Marchuk DA, Gadde KM, Barefoot JC, Grichnik K, Helms MJ, Kuhn CM, Lewis JG, Schanberg SM, Stafford-Smith M.... (2003) Serotonin-related gene polymorphisms and central nervous system serotonin function. Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 28(3), 533-41. PMID: 12629534  

Wong CC, Caspi A, Williams B, Craig IW, Houts R, Ambler A, Moffitt TE, & Mill J. (2010) A longitudinal study of epigenetic variation in twins. Epigenetics : official journal of the DNA Methylation Society, 5(6), 516-26. PMID: 20505345  

Yu YW, Tsai SJ, Hong CJ, Chen TJ, Chen MC, & Yang CW. (2005) Association study of a monoamine oxidase a gene promoter polymorphism with major depressive disorder and antidepressant response. Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 30(9), 1719-23. PMID: 15956990  

  • August 1, 2014
  • 01:18 AM
  • 148 views

The Evidence from Skull Measurements

by teofilo in Gambler's House

So far in this series of posts on “tracing the connections” between ancient Pueblo sites like Chaco Canyon and modern Pueblos, I’ve discussed evidence from linguistics and folklore, but of course if the issue is determining which modern groups are physically descended from which ancient ones it’s hard to beat evidence from actual physical remains. […]... Read more »

Schillaci, M., & Stojanowski, C. (2002) A Reassessment of Matrilocality in Chacoan Culture. American Antiquity, 67(2), 343. DOI: 10.2307/2694571  

  • July 30, 2014
  • 08:23 PM
  • 133 views

How the presence of a bilingual school changes the linguistic profile of a community

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

It is one of the great narratives of our time that the market will fix everything. In education this means that parental choice is assumed to improve education. Rather than the state supplying high-quality education, the neoliberal credo is that … Continue reading →... Read more »

Clyne, Michael. (2005) Australia's Language Potential . Sydney, UNSW Press. . info:/

  • July 29, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 109 views

Finding the Missing Stories: The Prior Cemetery’s Unmarked Slave Graves

by Katy Meyers in Bones Don't Lie

One of the more common (though often frustrating) questions we get in archaeology is “Why are you doing historic archaeology? We already know what happened”. To some extent, for eras […]... Read more »

  • July 29, 2014
  • 07:35 AM
  • 149 views

Is Twitter Ruining Our Proper English?

by Katja Keuchenius in United Academics

“Hey al im on my way 2wrk but i totes 4got 2bring ur ipod sori il hav 2 bring it nxt tym ur workin. Hav a nice day xo”
Gives you the cramps? Maybe you should read this article.... Read more »

  • July 25, 2014
  • 11:12 AM
  • 181 views

Spotted at last: “Homo economicus”?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Are we selfish? Economists like to say that, to a first approximation, we are. In other words, that we tend to seek to maximize our own rewards, in a more or less rational manner. The trouble is that this theory (at least, a straightforward interpretation of it) doesn’t describe how people behave in many situations. […]The post Spotted at last: “Homo economicus”? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Yamagishi T, Li Y, Takagishi H, Matsumoto Y, & Kiyonari T. (2014) In Search of Homo economicus. Psychological science. PMID: 25037961  

  • July 24, 2014
  • 09:12 AM
  • 61 views

Using Teeth to Learn About Diet, Cooking and Food Processing in Prehistoric Sudan

by Katy Meyers in Bones Don't Lie

How could someone determine what you eat from only examining the things you leave behind? To add to the challenge, you would be hypothetically deceased and unable to communicate your […]... Read more »

  • July 20, 2014
  • 03:43 PM
  • 134 views

Babylonian Neurology and Psychiatry

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A fascinating little paper in Brain examines Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon. It’s a collaboration by British neurologist Edward H. Reynolds and Assyriologist James V. Kinnier Wilson. The sources they discuss are almost 4,000 years old, dating to the Old Babylonian Dynasty of 1894 – 1595 BC. Writing in cuneiform script impressed into clay tablets, […]The post Babylonian Neurology and Psychiatry appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Reynolds EH, & Kinnier Wilson JV. (2014) Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon. Brain : a journal of neurology. PMID: 25037816  

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