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  • November 11, 2015
  • 08:40 AM
  • 933 views

Where Do All Those Leaves Come From?!

by Mark Lasbury in The 'Scope

As you grab your rake or leaf-blower this fall, you might wonder how it is possible for trees to make so many leaves. Learn where they all came from.... Read more »

Pijpers, J., Winkler, M., Surendranath, Y., Buonassisi, T., & Nocera, D. (2011) Light-induced water oxidation at silicon electrodes functionalized with a cobalt oxygen-evolving catalyst. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(25), 10056-10061. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1106545108  

  • November 9, 2015
  • 01:17 PM
  • 934 views

Solving the silicon swelling problem in batteries

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Silicon anodes offer great capacity for next-generation batteries but suffer from volume expansion that degrades batteries. Here new research has found a clever method to allow for volume expansion and maintain their high potential capacity!... Read more »

  • November 4, 2015
  • 03:58 AM
  • 766 views

Earth has probably more diamonds than we think

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Scientists have suggested that we have more diamonds than we think, and the process of formation of diamond is probably not as complicated as we think.

Published in:

Nature Communications

Study Further:

In a recent study from scientists of Johns Hopkins University, it has been suggested that diamonds in the Earth are not as rare as once thought. They are of opinion that diamonds are commonly produced deep inside the Earth.

“Diamond formation in the deep Earth,........ Read more »

  • November 1, 2015
  • 05:42 AM
  • 946 views

News on propulsion at NASA

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

There has been a lot of rumor on measurements performed by Eagleworks labs at NASA this spring. After that, NASA imposed a veto on whatever information should coming out about the work of this group until peer-reviewed work should have appeared. Most of the problems come out from the question of the EmDrive. This is […]... Read more »

  • October 29, 2015
  • 02:32 PM
  • 659 views

Equity or inertia: how global emissions sharing philosophies shape climate policy success

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

The US, EU, and China have recently pledged emissions reductions. But are they enough? Read on about a policy analysis describing how more needs to be done.... Read more »

Peters, G., Andrew, R., Solomon, S., & Friedlingstein, P. (2015) Measuring a fair and ambitious climate agreement using cumulative emissions. Environmental Research Letters, 10(10), 105004. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/10/10/105004  

  • October 20, 2015
  • 02:30 PM
  • 963 views

You too can learn to farm on Mars!

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Scientists at Washington State University and the University of Idaho are helping students figure out how to farm on Mars, much like astronaut Mark Watney, played by Matt Damon, attempts in the critically acclaimed movie “The Martian.” Washington State University physicist Michael Allen and University of Idaho food scientist Helen Joyner teamed up to explore the […]... Read more »

Helen S. Joyner et al. (2015) Farming In Space? Developing a Sustainable Food Supply on Mars. National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science. info:other/Link

  • October 15, 2015
  • 09:43 AM
  • 1,225 views

Climate change in the classroom: visualizing global warming effects with nothing but water and a marble

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

How do we make sea level rise due to global warming more personal? A new educational experiment has been designed to show the physics behind this phenomenon that can be done in the kitchen or the classroom.... Read more »

  • October 7, 2015
  • 02:56 PM
  • 951 views

Is radiation or human intrusion the more clear and present danger to animals near Chernobyl?

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Chernobyl has an unhospitable reputation for wildlife. But new research suggests that animals are thriving in the wild near the old reactor site.... Read more »

Deryabina, T., Kuchmel, S., Nagorskaya, L., Hinton, T., Beasley, J., Lerebours, A., & Smith, J. (2015) Long-term census data reveal abundant wildlife populations at Chernobyl. Current Biology, 25(19). DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.08.017  

  • October 6, 2015
  • 10:11 AM
  • 940 views

How Cuttlefish Stay Camouflaged On the Go

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Most camouflaged creatures try to hold still so they won't give away their ruse. But cuttlefish aren't most creatures. These masters of camouflage can change color to seamlessly match their background, and they can keep swimming while they do it.

"Cuttlefish are one of nature's fastest dynamic camouflagers," says Noam Josef, a graduate student at the Ben Gurion University of the Negev in Israel. The cephalopods can change color in just one tenth of a second. They can also create different........ Read more »

Josef N, Berenshtein I, Fiorito G, Sykes AV, & Shashar N. (2015) Camouflage during movement in the European cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis). The Journal of experimental biology. PMID: 26385328  

  • September 30, 2015
  • 08:40 PM
  • 766 views

Zooplankton migration traps carbon in deep ocean

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

A new mechanism of trapping carbon in the ocean has been proposed by researchers studying the migration of zooplankton!... Read more »

Jónasdóttir SH, Visser AW, Richardson K, & Heath MR. (2015) Seasonal copepod lipid pump promotes carbon sequestration in the deep North Atlantic. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 26338976  

  • September 24, 2015
  • 06:03 PM
  • 835 views

New solar cells inspired by 400-year-old art

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Kirigami, the ancient art of paper cutting, has inspired a new type of solar cell that can track the sun without lots of expensive materials!... Read more »

Lamoureux, A., Lee, K., Shlian, M., Forrest, S., & Shtein, M. (2015) Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking. Nature Communications, 8092. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms9092  

  • September 17, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,611 views

The Martian: Getting Home Is Just Half The Problem

by Mark Lasbury in The 'Scope

"The Martian" movie opens soon! It's about an astronaut stranded on Mars who is trying to survive and find a way to get back home. But today, we humans here on Earth still have to think of clever ways to survive a trip to the red planet in the first place.... Read more »

  • September 16, 2015
  • 11:26 AM
  • 922 views

Penguins Find Each Other's Beaks Sexy

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



If Tinder for penguins existed, birds with the best beak spots would get swiped right. King penguins are attracted to the colors on each other's beaks, scientists have found—including colors we clueless humans can't see.

King penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) live near the bottom of the world and are monogamous for about a year at a time. They're a little smaller than emperor penguins, the ones you saw in March of the Penguins, and have a less arduous lifestyle. In the spring, they gath........ Read more »

Keddar, I., Altmeyer, S., Couchoux, C., Jouventin, P., & Dobson, F. (2015) Mate Choice and Colored Beak Spots of King Penguins. Ethology. DOI: 10.1111/eth.12419  

  • September 11, 2015
  • 06:06 PM
  • 5,813 views

Smart cells teach neurons damaged by Parkinson’s to heal themselves

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

As a potential treatment for Parkinson’s disease, scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have created smarter immune cells that produce and deliver a healing protein to the brain while also teaching neurons to begin making the protein for themselves.... Read more »

  • September 10, 2015
  • 02:26 PM
  • 757 views

Physicists show ‘molecules’ made of light may be possible

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

It’s not lightsaber time… at least not yet. But a team including theoretical physicists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has taken another step toward building objects out of photons, and the findings* hint that weightless particles of light can be joined into a sort of “molecule” with its own peculiar force.... Read more »

M. F. Maghrebi, M. J. Gullans, P. Bienias, S. Choi, I. Martin, O. Firstenberg, M. D. Lukin, H. P. Büchler, & A. V. Gorshkov. (2015) Coulomb bound states of strongly interacting photons. Physical Review Letters. arXiv: 1505.03859v1

  • September 9, 2015
  • 06:21 PM
  • 824 views

Carving a path towards carbon pricing

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Why aren't carbon taxes more common? A new policy paper talks about the resistance and decreasing the cost of renewables can make carbon pricing the ONLY smart option.... Read more »

Wagner, G., Kåberger, T., Olai, S., Oppenheimer, M., Rittenhouse, K., & Sterner, T. (2015) Energy policy: Push renewables to spur carbon pricing. Nature, 525(7567), 27-29. DOI: 10.1038/525027a  

  • September 2, 2015
  • 05:03 AM
  • 824 views

Higgs even more standard

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

LHCP 2015 is going on at St. Peterburg and new results were presented by the two main collaborations at CERN. CMS and ATLAS combined the results from run 1 and improved the quality of the measured data of the Higgs particle discovered on 2012. CERN press release is here. I show you the main picture about […]... Read more »

  • August 21, 2015
  • 12:49 PM
  • 891 views

To Avoid Mosquitoes, Stop Breathing and Be Invisible

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Hungry mosquitoes use an arsenal of sensory tools to hunt you down. They sniff out the carbon dioxide you exhale; they home in on your heat signature. But a previously under-appreciated tool in the mosquito's kit is the same one you use just before slapping at it in horror: vision.

At Caltech, Floris van Breugel put mosquitoes in a wind tunnel to tease apart how they find their meals. He used Aedes aegypti, a tropical species that spreads yellow fever and other diseases. The insects wer........ Read more »

van Breugel, F., Riffell, J., Fairhall, A., & Dickinson, M. (2015) Mosquitoes Use Vision to Associate Odor Plumes with Thermal Targets. Current Biology, 25(16), 2123-2129. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.06.046  

  • August 20, 2015
  • 06:01 PM
  • 904 views

The story of a cave and climate change

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Old writings spanning the last four hundred years have been discovered in China that detail eras of drought. Using these as a starting point, researchers have connected the time periods with changes in rainfall to predict future droughts in the region.... Read more »

Tan, L., Cai, Y., An, Z., Cheng, H., Shen, C., Breitenbach, S., Gao, Y., Edwards, R., Zhang, H., & Du, Y. (2015) A Chinese cave links climate change, social impacts, and human adaptation over the last 500 years. Scientific Reports, 12284. DOI: 10.1038/srep12284  

  • August 20, 2015
  • 02:09 PM
  • 1,126 views

Falling with Style: Controlled Gliding in Spiders

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

Sometimes I read a paper because the methods catch my eye. I can just imagine some scientists sitting around a table with a beer and saying, “I wonder what would happen if we just dropped a bunch of spiders from the tops of trees.” An article published online yesterday did just that.Barro Colorado Island is a man-made island is located in Gatun Lake, created by filling of the Panama Canal. It is covered in tropical rainforests, and its inhabitants have been studied extensively. It would be a........ Read more »

Stephen P. Yanoviak, Yonatan Munk, & Robert Dudley. (2015) Arachnid aloft: directed aerial descent in neotropical canopy spiders. J. R. Soc. Interface. info:/10.1098/rsif.2015.0534

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