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  • February 28, 2008
  • 12:05 AM
  • 1,140 views

Good News for Ugly Babies

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

Babies really have it made. They usually have at least one, and sometimes a coterie, of people in their life devoted to figuring out exactly what will make them happy, whether it be food, milk, a pacifier, etc. They also have the privilege of enjoying a warm, cooing welcome from almost anyone they encounter, be it a close relative or complete stranger. Not many of us have the ability to turn away from a smiling baby with cold indifference, and some will stop whatever they are doing just to walk ........ Read more »

Morten Kringelbach, Annukka Lehtonen, Sarah Squire, Allison G Harvey, Michelle G Craske, Ian E Holliday, Alexander L Green, Tipu Z Aziz, Peter C Hansen, Piers L Cornelissen.... (2008) A Specific and Rapid Neural Signature for Parental Instinct. PLoS ONE, 3(2). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0001664  

  • February 27, 2008
  • 11:13 AM
  • 1,233 views

Adults more tolerant when informed about Autism diagnosis?

by Nestor Lopez-Duran in Translating Autism

Title: Adult Attitudes Toward Behaviors of a Six-year-old Boy with Autism
Source: Chambres, P., Auxiette, C., Vansingle, C., Gil, S. (2008). Adult Attitudes Toward Behaviors of a Six-year-old Boy with Autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders DOI: 10.1007/s10803-007-0519-5

A common experience reported by parents of children with autism is the perception of being ‘judged’ by other

... Read more »

Patrick Chambres, Catherine Auxiette, Carole Vansingle, & Sandrine Gil. (2008) Adult Attitudes Toward Behaviors of a Six-year-old Boy with Autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. DOI: 10.1007/s10803-007-0519-5  

  • February 26, 2008
  • 09:04 PM
  • 1,516 views

Testing Popular Visualization Techniques for Representing Model Uncertainty

by Chaya Chopra in Decision Psychology

How can urban planners visualize uncertainty in spatial models? Aerts (1997) attempts to answer this question by reviewing literature on uncertainty and then testing two methods within the SLEUTH model for land use.
Aerts points out that most visualization research makes use of Bertin’s 1983 framework, which identifies a number of visual variables such as ... Read more »

Jeroen Aerts, Keith C. Clarke, & Alex D. Keuper. (2003) Testing Popular Visualization Techniques for Representing Model Uncertainty. Cartography and Geographic Information Science, 30(3), 249-261.

  • February 26, 2008
  • 09:00 PM
  • 2,150 views

We respond differently to babies' faces within 150 milliseconds

by Dave Munger in Cognitive Daily

It's hard to resist flirting with babies. Even if a baby has been screaming her head off for hours on end in the seat behind you on a transatlantic flight, if she giggles and smiles when you're deplaning, you'll probably smile back. What is it about babies that makes our hearts melt almost instantaneously when we see them? Is it their cuteness, their happiness, or just their babyness?

A team led by Morten Kringelbach showed photos of babies and adults to twelve volunteers while t........ Read more »

Morten Kringelbach, Annukka Lehtonen, Sarah Squire, Allison G Harvey, Michelle G Craske, Ian E Holliday, Alexander L Green, Tipu Z Aziz, Peter C Hansen, Piers L Cornelissen.... (2008) A Specific and Rapid Neural Signature for Parental Instinct. PLoS ONE, 3(2). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0001664  

  • February 26, 2008
  • 11:14 AM
  • 1,396 views

Autism and Spontaneous Communication

by Nestor Lopez-Duran in Translating Autism

Title: Communicative spontaneity of children with autism: A preliminary analysis
Source:Chiang, H. (2008). Communicative spontaneity of children with autism: A preliminary analysis. Autism, 12(1), 9-21. DOI: 10.1177/1362361307085264

The author of this preliminary study wanted to explore the factors that are associated with communicative spontaneity in children with autism. Communicative

... Read more »

  • February 26, 2008
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,365 views

Understanding Memory at the Molecular Level

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

Probably the most extensively researched facet of cognition, memory has proven to be as difficult a process to unravel as it is essential to the human experience. Monumental developments in memory research are occurring regularly, however, although they are often under the public radar as they are only pieces of a puzzle we are still incapable of fully assembling. Regardless, the work being done on these pieces will one day allow for an understanding of memory so extensive it will seem to have l........ Read more »

  • February 25, 2008
  • 05:00 PM
  • 2,080 views

Problems in identifying people of other races: Are kids as bad as grown-ups?

by Dave Munger in Cognitive Daily

When adults are asked if they remember pictures of faces, they're more accurate when the faces are the same race as they are. It makes some sense -- people are likely to spend more time with and have more same-race friends, so they may become better attuned to the differences in individuals in their own racial group. This finding can be especially important in eyewitness testimony: If a crime victim identifies his assailant as someone of a different race, then the research suggests that thi........ Read more »

B CORENBLUM, & C MEISSNER. (2006) Recognition of faces of ingroup and outgroup children and adults. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 93(3), 187-206. DOI: 10.1016/j.jecp.2005.09.001  

  • February 25, 2008
  • 01:04 AM
  • 1,410 views

Visualizing georeferenced data: representing reliability of health statistics

by Chaya Chopra in Decision Psychology

Epidemiological cartography suffers from a “small area/small number” problem, where if the population at risk is small, derived measures are unstable and therefore unreliable. This study proposes that this problem can be solved by embedding reliability data directly into maps, thus aiming to develop a conceptual framework for selecting representational methods to depict both ... Read more »

A MacEachren, C A Brewer, & L W Pickle. (1998) Visualizing georeferenced data: representing reliability of health statistics. Environment and Planning A, 1547-1561.

  • February 23, 2008
  • 10:00 PM
  • 1,237 views

Clonidine and Sleep problems in children with Autism

by Nestor Lopez-Duran in Translating Autism

Title:Use of clonidine in children with autism spectrum disorders.
Source:MING, X. (2008). Use of clonidine in children with autism spectrum disorders. Brain and Development DOI: 10.1016/j.braindev.2007.12.007

In this study the authors wanted to evaluate the effectiveness of clonidine in the treatment of insomnia and other behavioral difficulties in children with autism spectrum disorder. The

... Read more »

  • February 23, 2008
  • 03:06 PM
  • 1,489 views

Autism, IQ, and the Stanford–Binet

by Nestor Lopez-Duran in Translating Autism

Title: Brief Report: Data on the Stanford–Binet Intelligence Scales (5th ed.) in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Source: Coolican, J., Bryson, S.E., Zwaigenbaum, L. (2008). Brief Report: Data on the Stanford–Binet Intelligence Scales (5th ed.) in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders , 38(1), 190-197.

In 2003 the

... Read more »

Jamesie Coolican, Susan Bryson, & Lonnie Zwaigenbaum. (2008) Brief Report: Data on the Stanford–Binet Intelligence Scales (5th ed.) in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders , 38(1), 190-197.

  • February 22, 2008
  • 09:03 PM
  • 1,424 views

Mapping Mortality: Evaluating Color Schemes for Choropleth Maps

by Chaya Chopra in Decision Psychology

Choice of color scheme can have a substantial influence on whether or not map users can accurately extract specific details from a map as well as appropriately interpret more general pattern information. Thus this study aims to establish optimal color combinations for mapping.
128 subjects participated, with equal numbers of males and females and an ... Read more »

Cynthia Brewer, Alan M MacEachren, Linda W Pickle, & Douglas Herrmann. (1997) Mapping Mortality: Evaluating Color Schemes for Choropleth Maps. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 87(3), 411-438. http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici

  • February 22, 2008
  • 05:03 AM
  • 1,724 views

Baghdad teenagers show heightened sense of self in the face of war

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

For obvious reasons, few social science researchers have ventured into Iraq since the American-led invasion. However, in 2004, a year into the hostilities, the US Army funded a team of Iraqi interviewers, based at the Asharq Centre for Polls and Marketing Research, to go into ten neighbourhoods of Baghdad to survey the concerns and self-esteem of 1000 teenagers.The results showed that rather than damaging their sense of self, the war appeared to have bolstered the teenagers' self-esteem, es........ Read more »

  • February 21, 2008
  • 05:02 AM
  • 2,056 views

Has average intelligence started to decline?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

After years on the increase, average intelligence test performance could be in decline. That's according to Thomas Teasdale and David Owen who took advantage of the Danish tradition of testing the intelligence of all 18-year-old men being considered for conscription into military service.Consistent with the observed world-wide increase in average intelligence - the Flynn Effect - the 25,000 young men assessed for military service in Denmark in 1999 performed significantly better, by about 2........ Read more »

  • February 20, 2008
  • 06:00 PM
  • 2,246 views

Do our stereotypes about music fans match their actual preferences?

by Dave Munger in Cognitive Daily

One of the most common "icebreaker" conversation topics is music preferences. We ask friends what they're listening to on their iPods, bloggers post playlists on their sidebars, and one of the most popular websites on the planet (MySpace) is built around sharing music. The assumption is that musical preferences can tell us something beyond what someone likes to listen to -- we believe we can judge a person's personality, fashion preferences, and more based just on the style o........ Read more »

Peter Rentfrow, & Samuel D Gosling. (2007) The content and validity of music-genre stereotypes among college students. Psychology of Music, 35(2), 306-326.

  • February 20, 2008
  • 03:02 AM
  • 1,243 views

Can Neuroscience and Free Will Coexist?

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

Studying neuroscience involves dissecting individual behaviors and separating them into their biological components. For example, imagine yourself sitting in front of the television as dinner time is nearing. You grow hungrier as you wait for the show you are watching to come to end, then when it does you get up and go to the kitchen to make something to eat. If an interviewer were to later ask you why you got up to eat at that moment, you might reply “I was hungry, so I decided to have di........ Read more »

Roy Baumeister. (2008) Free Will in Scientific Psychology. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 3(1), 14-19. DOI: 10.1111/j.1745-6916.2008.00057  

  • February 19, 2008
  • 03:59 PM
  • 1,825 views

The anatomy of an illusion -- and what it tells us about the visual system

by Dave Munger in Cognitive Daily

Take a look at this amazing illusion created by Arthur Shapiro (you'll need the latest version of Flash Player to see it):





You're looking at two donut-shaped figures whose "holes" are gradually changing color from black to white and back again. It appears that the holes are changing in an opposite pattern -- when one is light, the other is dark, and so on. But if you click to remove the surrounding donuts, you'll see that the two holes are actually changing together........ Read more »

Arthur Shapiro. (2008) Separating color from color contrast. Journal of Vision, 8(1), 1-18. http://journalofvision.org/8/1/8/

  • February 19, 2008
  • 05:03 AM
  • 1,803 views

Childless women are the most productive staff of all, study finds

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

An investigation into the impact of having children on the productivity of male and female lawyers has found that childless women get the most work done - more than childless male lawyers and lawyers of either gender who have children.Jean Wallace and Marisa Young studied how many hours 670 lawyers in Alberta, Canada, had billed their clients in the past year. As well as identifying the superior productivity of childless women, they also found that having children impacts the productivity of men........ Read more »

  • February 18, 2008
  • 06:02 AM
  • 2,214 views

Alzheimer's patients retain their taste in art

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

As Alzheimer's disease wipes out a person's identity, their taste in art can remain stubbornly, wonderfully, intact. Andrea Halpern and colleagues hope their finding will bring encouragement to carers of people with the disease.Seventeen healthy older adults and sixteen older adults with probable Alzheimer's disease were asked to place three sets of eight art post-cards in order of preference. One set depicted representational paintings (e.g. Hopper's People in the Sun), anot........ Read more »

  • February 16, 2008
  • 12:04 AM
  • 1,254 views

Can Neuroscience and Free Will Co-Exist?

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

Studying neuroscience involves dissecting individual behaviors and separating them into their biological components. For example, imagine yourself sitting in front of the television as dinner time is nearing. You grow hungrier as you wait for the show you are watching to come to end, then when it does you get up and go to the kitchen to make something to eat. If an interviewer were to later ask you why you got up to eat at that moment, you might reply “I was hungry, so I decided to have di........ Read more »

Roy Baumeister. (2008) Free Will in Scientific Psychology. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 3(1), 14-19. DOI: 10.1111/j.1745-6916.2008.00057  

  • February 15, 2008
  • 05:02 AM
  • 1,892 views

Is it time to ditch the Hawthorne Effect?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

While use of the term 'Hawthorne Effect' is thriving in journals and textbooks, its meaning is so vague as to be unhelpful. That's according to Mecca Chiesa and Sandy Hobbs, who begin their argument by identifying the first use of the term. This was by John French in 1953, as he described experiments on the productivity of factory workers at the Hawthorne Works of the Western Electric Company, Chicago, between 1927-1933."From a methodological point of view," French wrote........ Read more »

Mecca Chiesa, & Sandy Hobbs. (2008) Making sense of social research: how useful is the Hawthorne Effect?. European Journal of Social Psychology, 38(1), 67-74. DOI: 10.1002/ejsp.401  

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