Post List

Social Science posts

(Modify Search »)

  • April 16, 2014
  • 08:29 PM
  • 15 views

What makes music groovy?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Today PLOS ONE publishes a study that uses an often criticized research method: questionnaire and web-based research (cf. Honing & Ladinig, 2008). This study, however, is a good example of how an unspectacular method (i.e. compared to, e.g., controlled experiments, brain imaging techniques or computational modelling) can still be quite informative.... Read more »

Witek, M., Clarke, E., Wallentin, M., Kringelbach, M., & Vuust, P. (2014) Syncopation, Body-Movement and Pleasure in Groove Music. PLoS ONE, 9(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0094446  

Honing, H., & Reips, U.-D. (2008) Web-based versus lab-based studies: a response to Kendall (2008). Empirical Musicology Review, 3(2), 73-77. info:/

  • April 14, 2014
  • 01:10 PM
  • 104 views

Does Access to Birth Control Reduce Poverty?

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

In American politics the proliferation of birth control is important because of how it affects the eternal resting place of our immortal souls. But believe it or not, there are also non-metaphysical policy consequences to increasing access to birth control. A new study by a pair of economists — Stephanie Browne of J.P. Morgan and […]... Read more »

Browne, S., & LaLumia, S. (2014) The Effects of Contraception on Female Poverty. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management. DOI: 10.1002/pam.21761  

  • April 13, 2014
  • 11:45 PM
  • 52 views

Big data, prediction, and scientism in the social sciences

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Much of my undergrad was spent studying physics, and although I still think that a physics background is great for a theorists in any field, there are some downsides. For example, I used to make jokes like: “soft isn’t the opposite of hard sciences, easy is.” Thankfully, over the years I have started to slowly […]... Read more »

Lazer, D., Kennedy, R., King, G., & Vespignani, A. (2014) Big data. The parable of Google Flu: traps in big data analysis. Science, 343(6176), 1203-1205. PMID: 24626916  

  • April 13, 2014
  • 11:59 AM
  • 81 views

The Curse of the Internet

by Aurametrix team in Health Technologies

It's hard to imagine our lives without the Internet  - either mobile or desktop. The Internet has become a catalyst of innovation, an essential tool in business and social life. It brought new levels of participation and access to knowledge. It enabled new forms of interaction, albeit mostly utilized for entertainment purposes. But despite all the advantages and conveniences, does the Internet really serve us or is it the other way around?... Read more »

  • April 7, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 69 views

Just because I think they’re out to get me doesn’t mean they aren’t

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Not long ago we blogged about the reality that half of Americans believe in at least one public health conspiracy. The same researchers have now looked into other conspiracy theories and found similar trends: half of Americans believe at least one conspiracy theory. So. Let’s take a look at what the researchers say about the sort […]

Related posts:
Osama bin Laden is dead and (simultaneously) Osama bin Laden lives!
Think conspiracy theorists live on the fringes? Think again!
Conspiracy........ Read more »

  • April 3, 2014
  • 03:26 PM
  • 101 views

Are The Mafia Psychopaths?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

The view that the Mafia is an organization of especially ruthless psychopaths is wrong – in fact, members of ‘Cosa Nostra’ have lower psychopathic traits than other criminals. That’s according to a new study from Italian researchers Schimmenti and colleagues, who, appropriately enough, are based in Sicily, the Mafia’s birthplace. Schimmenti et al went to […]The post Are The Mafia Psychopaths? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Schimmenti, A., Caprì, C., La Barbera, D., & Caretti, V. (2014) Mafia and psychopathy. Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health. DOI: 10.1002/cbm.1902  

  • April 2, 2014
  • 12:34 AM
  • 95 views

The Connection Between Conspiracy Theories and Ambivalence

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

It’s a good time to be in the conspiracy theory business, and not just because the birthplace of the U.S. President has been verified only 72 times. Thanks to the internet, it’s easier than ever to track down potentially suspicious information and discuss it with like-minded gumshoes. While certain people may be predisposed to believing in certain kinds […]... Read more »

van Harreveld, F., Rutjens, B., Schneider, I., Nohlen, H., & Keskinis, K. (2014) In Doubt and Disorderly: Ambivalence Promotes Compensatory Perceptions of Order. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. DOI: 10.1037/a0036099  

  • March 31, 2014
  • 03:00 PM
  • 69 views

Are Drama Queens To Be Trusted? Research Thinks They Are

by Nura Rutten in United Academics

Recent study shows incidental emotions change others' reciprocity in trusting situations.... Read more »

  • March 31, 2014
  • 09:25 AM
  • 83 views

Dutch Men are not Nordic Men

by Rense Nieuwenhuis in Curving Normality

There are reasons to appreciate Hanna Rosin’s ‘The End of Men’: it was pleasantly written, contains various entertaining anecdotes, and holds an attractive promise of increased gender equality – although, to trumpet the demise of men (to paraphrase page 285) might be somewhat less desirable. It would have made for a relevant book, were it not that the facts are wrong.... Read more »

Philip Cohen. (2013) The “End of Men” Is Not True: What Is Not and What Might Be on the Road Toward Gender Equality. BOSTON UNIVERSITY LAW REVIEW, 1159-1184. info:/

  • March 30, 2014
  • 11:28 PM
  • 78 views

Linguistic penalty in the job interview

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

A common explanation for the un- and underemployment of migrants is that their English is not good enough. Despite the overuse of this explanation, we do, in fact, not have a particularly clear idea what “good English” for a particular … Continue reading →... Read more »

Roberts, Celia. (2013) The Gatekeeping of Babel: Job Interviews and the Linguistic Penalty. A. Duchêne, M. Moyer , 81-94. info:/

  • March 29, 2014
  • 07:31 AM
  • 62 views

Climate sensitivity wrangles don’t change the big picture on emissions

by Andy Extance in Simple Climate

Modelling studies from Joeri Rogelj at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich show we still need to release fewer greenhouse gases even if the world does warm more slowly in response to them than today’s best estimates suggest. ... Read more »

  • March 28, 2014
  • 05:57 PM
  • 91 views

Why mixing languages isn’t so bad after all

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

by Kaisa Pietikäinen You know those moments when you’re speaking English (as a lingua franca, or ELF), and all of a sudden your mind goes blank? You know the word you’re looking for, but you just can’t get it into your head. You might remember it in another language, but your brain just isn’t connecting […]... Read more »

Pietikäinen, K. (2014) ELF couples and automatic code-switching. Journal of English as a Lingua Franca, 3(1), 1-26. DOI: 10.1515/jelf-2014-0001  

  • March 26, 2014
  • 07:49 PM
  • 88 views

Study: Electric-Vehicle Tax Incentives Are Inefficient

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

New research published in Energy Policy suggests that electric-vehicle proponents and policymakers have missed the mark when it comes to targeting mainstream consumers, arguing that electric-vehicle tax incentives for mainstream buyers are “wasteful, inefficient and ineffective.”... Read more »

  • March 26, 2014
  • 06:45 PM
  • 96 views

The Ugly Ducklings of Science

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A group of management researchers provide new evidence of a worrying bias in the scientific process – The Chrysalis Effect: How Ugly Initial Results Metamorphosize Into Beautiful Articles ( via Retraction Watch ) The issue they highlight – the ability of researchers to eventually squeeze support for a theory out of initially negative data – […]The post The Ugly Ducklings of Science appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

  • March 25, 2014
  • 06:16 PM
  • 97 views

Wind Industry, Even With Energy Storage Costs, Is Sustainable

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Today’s wind industry, even with the necessary batteries and other grid-scale storage, is energetically sustainable, Stanford scientists say.... Read more »

  • March 25, 2014
  • 04:41 AM
  • 75 views

How You Understand What Your Pet Is Saying

by Chiara Civardi in United Academics

If you are used to have a pet, it is even likely for you to understand what your non- human friend is telling you. This ability to correctly identify the feelings of other people or other animals is called voice- induced emotional recognition.... Read more »

  • March 25, 2014
  • 12:02 AM
  • 88 views

“I am Working-Class”: Self-Identification as a Measure of Social Class in Educational Research

by Mark Rubin in Mark Rubin's Social Psychology Research Blog

Governments around the world are trying to open up higher education to working-class people. For example, in January this year, the White House released a report titled: "Increasing college opportunity for low-income students: Promising models and a call to action." In the context of this general push towards widening participation in higher education, my colleagues and I have been developing a research project that aims to investigate social class differences in social integration among student........ Read more »

  • March 24, 2014
  • 09:43 AM
  • 86 views

Oral Health Status among 12 Year Old Children in a Rural Kenyan Community

by JDOH in JScholar Publishers

Dental caries remains a common disease among school-aged children and is thought to be increasing worldwide, especially in developing countries. The Oral Health Country/Area Profile Project reported that the Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth (DMFT) index, a standard indicator of oral health, increased steadily from 1.15 in 2004 to 1.19 in 2011 in 12-year-old children living in African countries [1]. In contrast, a systematic review of information published from 1967 to 1997 concluded that the DM........ Read more »

Yoshihiko Hayashi, Cyril N. Ogada, Eunice Kihara, Evelyn G. Wagaiyu, Hideki Fukuda*. (2014) Oral Health Status among 12 Year Old Children in a Rural Kenyan Community. JOURNAL OF DENTISTRY AND ORAL HEALTH, 2(1), 1-5. info:/JDOH 2: 101

  • March 23, 2014
  • 11:58 PM
  • 104 views

Non-drug approaches for people with fibromyalgia

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

No-one wants to be told their pain is “in your head”. But given our increasingly sophisticated understanding of pain neurobiology, there’s plenty of reason to agree that thinking, feeling and doing things differently makes life far more rewarding and rich than feeling helpless, fatigued and sore. Some proponents of purely biomedical interventions, notably musculoskeletal physicians, argue that if only the “source of the nociception” was found, the nerve “zappe........ Read more »

  • March 22, 2014
  • 07:03 AM
  • 118 views

Fairness instinct trumps economic expectations on climate costs

by Andy Extance in Simple Climate

Students taking the role of rich countries in climate negotiation games make generous offers to pay towards the cost of cutting greenhouse gas emissions on fairness grounds, finds Robert Gampfer from ETH Zurich, who suggests that governments doing the same might get popular support. ... Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.