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  • April 12, 2016
  • 11:53 AM
  • 638 views

Bioterrorism: Lessons Learned From Anthrax

by Rita dos Santos Silva in United Academics

Anthrax attacks in 2001 were a wake-up call for the importance of preparedness.... Read more »

Riedel S. (2005) Anthrax: a continuing concern in the era of bioterrorism. Proceedings (Baylor University. Medical Center), 18(3), 234-43. PMID: 16200179  

Anderson, P. (2012) Bioterrorism: Toxins as Weapons. Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 25(2), 121-129. DOI: 10.1177/0897190012442351  

  • April 10, 2016
  • 06:30 PM
  • 754 views

Spaced Practice

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Post moved: http://guzintamath.com/blog/2016/04/spaced-practice/

Spaced practice, also called distributed practice, refers to the practice—after initial learning—of leaving gaps in time between sessions devoted to reviewing previously learned material. This stands in contrast to its much less effective counterpart, massed practice, which "crams" all of the review together in time.... Read more »

  • April 9, 2016
  • 10:00 PM
  • 1,007 views

Interleaving

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Post has moved: http://guzintamath.com/blog/2016/04/interleaving-inductive-learning/

Many of the misconceptions we deal with in mathematics education in particular can be seen as the result of dealing with objects of 'low discriminability' (objects that are hard to tell apart). In many cases, these objects really are hard to tell apart, and in others we simply make them hard through our sequencing.... Read more »

  • April 6, 2016
  • 06:23 AM
  • 1,097 views

The language that cannot speak its name

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Our understanding of the role of language in social life suffers from a particularly intractable problem: the terms we use...... Read more »

  • April 5, 2016
  • 05:17 PM
  • 654 views

Suicidal thinking and US veterans

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Something very personal about me, the thought of suicide is never too far behind. It is to the point that I need to qualify it to my counselor when I am asked if I have thoughts of suicide, I always do. A new study shows that I am far from alone Nearly 14 percent of military veterans reported suicidal thinking at one or both phases of a two-year Veterans Affairs (VA) study.... Read more »

  • April 5, 2016
  • 06:43 AM
  • 692 views

Coffee’s Guilty Pleasure

by Chiara Civardi in United Academics

Eco-friendly behaviors, such as recycling coffee pods, are associated with a sense of pride.... Read more »

  • April 4, 2016
  • 03:57 PM
  • 892 views

Your brain has an altered response to desirable foods

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Hungry? Well, let’s face it, that pizza looks much better than the salad. Don’t deny it salad lovers, we all know behind closed doors you look at plenty of food porn to satiate your desires. Understanding the motivations that drive us to eat is important when we talk about weight loss and how we attempt to structure diets. Now a new study shows that for overweight individuals, the brain responses differently to desirable foods., but hold that thought, because there is hope.

... Read more »

  • April 3, 2016
  • 03:25 PM
  • 834 views

Debunking the Myth of the Sole Genious

by Paco Jariego in Mind the Post

Innovations don’t require heroic geniuses any more than your thoughts hinge on a particular neuron.... Read more »

Muthukrishna, M., & Henrich, J. (2016) Innovation in the collective brain. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 371(1690), 20150192. DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2015.0192  

  • April 2, 2016
  • 04:43 PM
  • 629 views

Born to run? Love of exercise may start in the womb

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

If you see me on the street and I am running, there is a good chance you should be running as well, because something dangerous is coming. I don’t run, I hate to run, I loathe running, did I mention I don’t like to run? Maybe it’s all the running I did in the military, or if a new study is correct, it may have to do with my mother. Which is good, because now I can blame someone else for my hatred of running.

... Read more »

Eclarinal, J., Zhu, S., Baker, M., Piyarathna, D., Coarfa, C., Fiorotto, M., & Waterland, R. (2016) Maternal exercise during pregnancy promotes physical activity in adult offspring. The FASEB Journal. DOI: 10.1096/fj.201500018R  

  • March 31, 2016
  • 11:08 AM
  • 626 views

The p-value Debate Has Reached SCM Research

by Andreas Wieland in Supply Chain Management Research

We should not ignore that researchers – in general but also in supply chain management – are not always as properly trained to perform data analysis as they should be. A highly visible discussion is currently going on regarding the prevalent misuses of p-values. For example, too often research has been considered as “good” research, […]... Read more »

  • March 30, 2016
  • 05:11 PM
  • 835 views

What is a good death?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Food for the worms, a dirt nap, kicking the bucket, maybe there are so many euphemisms for death because it is still a taboo in certain cultures. Not so fun fact, my Uncle committed suicide some years back. I’m not going to go into details, but because suicide is looked down on, was his death still considered a “good death”? Trying to qualitatively and quantitatively define a good death, researchers have published a new paper offering help in defining the idea of a good death and have ulti........ Read more »

  • March 30, 2016
  • 03:19 AM
  • 926 views

The real problem with linguistic shirkers

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Germany has discovered a new social type that is causing grieve in modern diverse societies: the “Integrationsverweigerer;” literally someone who...... Read more »

  • March 29, 2016
  • 04:31 PM
  • 953 views

Carb-loading and your heart, you may want to put the pasta down…

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

So if you are one of the bodybuilders, powerlifters, marathon runners, or just people who like to binge-eat every now and then — no judgment all you can eat pizza day is a thing I’m told telling myself — there is some bad news. If you like to preload carbs like they are the magic bullet to your workout woes, you may want to rethink it because according to a new study, it can have an acute and detrimental effect on heart function.

... Read more »

Arora, P., Wu, C., Hamid, T., Arora, G., Agha, O., Allen, K., Tainsh, R., Hu, D., Ryan, R., Domian, I.... (2016) Acute Metabolic Influences on the Natriuretic Peptide System in Humans. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 67(7), 804-812. DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2015.11.049  

  • March 29, 2016
  • 10:01 AM
  • 1,234 views

Nostalgia is a Muse

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

This view has been challenged by the University of Southampton researchers Constantine Sedikides and Tim Wildschut, who have spent the past decade studying the benefits of nostalgia. Not only do they disavow its disease status, they have conducted numerous studies which suggest that nostalgia can make us more creative, open-minded and charitable. The definition of nostalgia used by Sedikides and Wildschut as a "sentimental longing for one's past" is based on the contemporary usage........ Read more »

  • March 29, 2016
  • 06:53 AM
  • 656 views

Fairness In Science: What For?

by Francisco Azuaje in United Academics

Why is the quest for fairness in science still relevant today?... Read more »

  • March 27, 2016
  • 10:24 AM
  • 840 views

Responses to Typos and Personality: "Grammar Nazis" Confirmed?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Do you haet typos? If you spot a grammo (a grammatical error), does your blood boil?

Some people are more offended by these kinds of linguistic errors than others, but why? Ann Arbor psychologists Julie E. Boland and Robin Queen examine this in a new PLOS ONE paper called If You’re House Is Still Available, Send Me an Email: Personality Influences Reactions to Written Errors in Email Messages



The authors recruited 83 volunteers (on MTurk) and asked them to imagine that they'd placed an... Read more »

  • March 25, 2016
  • 06:51 PM
  • 809 views

Mental illness, that’s a funny term isn’t it?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

In today’s lexicon, the term mental illness is used pretty widely. It can be used to describe someone suffering from depression, to PTSD, to even someone suicidal. In fact, today it is sort of a catch all term for anyone who is involved in a mass shooting here in the US. We are getting off […]... Read more »

Elkington, K., Teplin, L., Abram, K., Jakubowski, J., Dulcan, M., & Welty, L. (2015) Psychiatric Disorders and Violence: A Study of Delinquent Youth After Detention. Journal of the American Academy of Child , 54(4), 302-31200000. DOI: 10.1016/j.jaac.2015.01.002  

Su, J., Chen, J., Lippold, K., Monavarfeshani, A., Carrillo, G., Jenkins, R., & Fox, M. (2016) Collagen-derived matricryptins promote inhibitory nerve terminal formation in the developing neocortex. The Journal of Cell Biology, 212(6), 721-736. DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201509085  

Jacobs, R., Barba, A., Gowins, J., Klumpp, H., Jenkins, L., Mickey, B., Ajilore, O., Peciña, M., Sikora, M., Ryan, K.... (2016) Decoupling of the amygdala to other salience network regions in adolescent-onset recurrent major depressive disorder. Psychological Medicine, 1-13. DOI: 10.1017/S0033291715002615  

  • March 24, 2016
  • 06:12 AM
  • 666 views

Creating Better Concept Definitions in SCM

by Andreas Wieland in Supply Chain Management Research

I believe we all have already experienced this: The same concept can sometimes be defined in very different ways by different authors. Conceptual clarity would certainly be great, but how can we achieve it? Think, for example, about concepts such as trust, integration or dependence. So, what do we really mean when we are talking […]... Read more »

  • March 23, 2016
  • 08:57 PM
  • 854 views

Trust is more important than religion in encouraging charitable acts

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

It’s well established that religious people tend to volunteer more and give more to charity than the non-religious. There are many factors that could contribute to this. Many charities that explicitly to support co-religionists or to promote religion, and what’s more religious people also tend to be older and married, both of which predict But [Read More...]... Read more »

Glanville, J., Paxton, P., & Wang, Y. (2015) Social Capital and Generosity: A Multilevel Analysis. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly. DOI: 10.1177/0899764015591366  

  • March 23, 2016
  • 06:37 PM
  • 809 views

Road rage and toxoplasmosis: Return of the parasite

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

It was a clear case of a false alarm, toxoplasmosis, a parasite that infects mice and cats was thought to have an effect on humans. However, after a thorough review of the data it was off the hook, or so we thought. Individuals with a psychiatric disorder involving recurrent bouts of extreme, impulsive anger--road rage, for example--are more than twice as likely to have been exposed to a common parasite than healthy individuals with no psychiatric diagnosis.

... Read more »

Coccaro, E., Lee, R., Groer, M., Can, A., Coussons-Read, M., & Postolache, T. (2016) Toxoplasma gondii Infection: Relationship With Aggression in Psychiatric Subjects. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 334-341. DOI: 10.4088/JCP.14m09621  

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