Post List

Social Science posts

(Modify Search »)

  • September 8, 2010
  • 05:30 AM
  • 490 views

Cleaning up the mess: redevelopment of urban brownfields

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

From Economic Development Quarterly The state of Michigan has had an aggressive program of environmental cleanup efforts targeted at contaminated properties since the early 1970s. Following  legislative changes brownfield redevelopment was made a top economic and environmental priority. This article examines the impact of the initiative. The findings present mixed results, identifying that 15% to 20% [...]... Read more »

Hula, R.C., & Bromley-Trujillo, R. (2010) Cleaning up the mess: redevelopment of urban brownfields. Economic Development Quarterly. info:/10.1177/0891242410365711

  • September 7, 2010
  • 08:41 PM
  • 539 views

Review: Brain damage and ordering of panels in comic strips

by Neil Cohn in The Visual Linguist

I recently reviewed an older study of brain damaged individual's comprehension of final-panel jokes in comic strips. Here's another paper that explores brain damage and the ordering of panels in sequences.Participants were asked to arrange scrambled parts of a story into their accurate order, and the authors compared the abilities of numerous types of brain damaged patients. Participants ... Read more »

  • September 7, 2010
  • 11:30 AM
  • 537 views

Trial Run

by Journal Watch Online in Journal Watch Online

It’s an old story: environmental protections laws enacted with the highest hopes end up entangled in lawsuits for years or even decades due to vague wording. But there may be a way to avoid the legal gridlock, argue two Australian scholars: Road test proposed rules in mock trials in “moot courts” before they get chiseled […] Read More »... Read more »

  • September 7, 2010
  • 05:30 AM
  • 408 views

Testing the trade relations theory that we are usually reluctant to “fight our customers”

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

Trade and foreign policy attitudes From Journal of Conflict Resolution This forty-seven-country survey focuses on attitudes toward two major participants in the international trading system, the United States and China. The study tests the liberal international relations theory that trade influences whether we view others as friendly or threatening, and the idea that the benefits [...]... Read more »

Katja B. Kleinberg, & Benjamin O. Fordham. (2010) Trade and Foreign Policy Attitudes. Journal of Conflict Resolution. info:/10.1177/0022002710364128

  • September 7, 2010
  • 05:30 AM
  • 358 views

Testing the trade relations theory that we are usually reluctant to “fight our customers”

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

Trade and foreign policy attitudes From Journal of Conflict Resolution This forty-seven-country survey focuses on attitudes toward two major participants in the international trading system, the United States and China. The study tests the liberal international relations theory that trade influences whether we view others as friendly or threatening, and the idea that the benefits [...]... Read more »

Katja B. Kleinberg, & Benjamin O. Fordham. (2010) Trade and Foreign Policy Attitudes. Journal of Conflict Resolution. info:/10.1177/0022002710364128

  • September 6, 2010
  • 05:36 PM
  • 571 views

Gender, religion, and volunteering

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

Here's a quick one on study of volunteering among older people. It's well known that religious people do more formal voluntary work, on average, than the non-religious. What's less well understood is why that should be.

Well, one other thing that's notable about religion in the USA is that it's more popular with women. And women also tend to volunteer more (well, both those 'facts' are more or less true depending on which study you look at).

In this new study, Lydia Manning of Miami University........ Read more »

  • September 6, 2010
  • 01:49 PM
  • 922 views

More on Phoneme Inventory Size and Demography

by Wintz in A Replicated Typo 2.0

On the basis of Sean’s comment, about using a regression to look at how phoneme inventory size improved as geographic spread was incorporated along with population size, I decided to look at the stats a bit more closely (original post is here). It’s fairly easy to perform multiple regression in R, which, in the case of . . . → Read More: More on Phoneme Inventory Size and Demography... Read more »

John Fox. (2005) Nonparametric Regression. Encyclopedia of Statistics in Behavioral Science. DOI: 10.1002/0470013192.bsa446  

  • September 5, 2010
  • 10:48 PM
  • 501 views

Science Blogging Meta

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

I love the Groth and Gurney paper, and not just because it introduced me to http://researchblogging.org/. The authors analyzed 295 blog posts about chemistry and the included citations. In comparison to the usual pieces which deal with science blogging in the scholarly literature, this paper has dealt with a large number of posts. Most of what I've read about science blogging are either opinion articles (Batts et al, 2008), or qualitative research, aka interviews with a small number of bloggers ........ Read more »

Paul Groth, & Thomas Gurney. (2010) Studying Scientific Discourse on the Web Using Bibliometrics: A Chemistry Blogging Case Study. In press. info:/

Sara Kjellberg. (2010) I am a blogging researcher: Motivations for blogging in a scholarly context. First Monday, 15(8). info:other/

  • September 5, 2010
  • 01:24 AM
  • 785 views

Boys Who Suicide and Masculinity Mutations

by Ultimo167 in Strong Silent Types

If you are going to argue, as Mac an Ghaill and Haywood (2010) do here, that masculinity does not provide a suitable template for understanding suicidal behaviour in boys, you would need to define which particular theory (or theories) of masculinity you are talking about.... Read more »

  • September 4, 2010
  • 09:11 AM
  • 532 views

Normal? You're Weird - Psychiatrists

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

Almost everyone is pretty screwed up. That's not my opinion, that's official - according to a new paper in the latest British Journal of Psychiatry.Make sure you're sitting down for this. No less than 48% of the population have "personality difficulties", 21% have a full blown "personality disorder", and 7% have it even worse with "complex" or "severe" personality disorders.That's quite a lot of people. Indeed it only leaves an elite 22.5% with no personality disturbances whatsoever. You're as l........ Read more »

Yang M, Coid J, & Tyrer P. (2010) Personality pathology recorded by severity: national survey. The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science, 193-9. PMID: 20807963  

  • September 4, 2010
  • 08:33 AM
  • 862 views

the original Whorf

by Chris in The Lousy Linguist

Guy Deutcher's NYT's article on how language affects thought continues to get buzz, as surely his book Through The Language Glass will when people read it (it was just released 3 days ago and is currently #234 on Amazon's book rank). One common reaction amongst bloggers is that Deutscher gives Whorf himself unfairly harsh treatment, and ultimately mis-represents Whorf's own opinions.For example, Kathryn Woolard, SLA President, says "Whorf’s own statements of his theory look little like the car........ Read more »

Benjamin Lee Whorf. (1940) Science and Linguistics. MIT Technology Review, 42(6). info:other/

  • September 3, 2010
  • 06:48 PM
  • 860 views

Psychological Flexibility Improves Your Health and Well-Being

by Ultimo167 in Strong Silent Types

Could it be that becoming more psychologically flexible could effectively heal much psychopathology? Kashdan and Rottenberg (2010) seem to think so.... Read more »

  • September 3, 2010
  • 05:00 AM
  • 1,145 views

Plague among the nuts

by Michelle Ziegler in Contagions

David Woods was looking at the early Irish chronicles and he noticed something very odd. There are clusters of entries recording large mast crops. Mast? In Ireland, that would be mostly acorns..  In these sparse annals that normally only record battles, deaths,  and other major events, why record large acorn falls? The only typical use [...]... Read more »

David Woods. (2003) Acorns, the Plague, and the 'Iona Chronicle'. Peritia, 495-502. info:/

  • September 2, 2010
  • 06:26 PM
  • 392 views

…give a dog a bad name, and shoot him

by Rift in Psycasm

[Wherein our hero - having gone AWOL - is posting old thoughts that might still be relevant. They're interesting, at the very least.... one hopes] As I’ve mentioned previously I’ve already attained a degree. I mention this because the body of this post represents the strangest assignment I’ve received in a full 6 years of [...]... Read more »

  • September 2, 2010
  • 05:51 PM
  • 887 views

The difference between being religous and being a believer

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

One of the big news stories from last year was the revelation that Americans are leaving their churches and religious institutions in droves. They are becoming "unaffiliated", although there was a lot of debate over what that meant. Are Americans losing religion, or is it simply that they are disillusioned with what they're being offered?

A new analysis, using data collected over the last three decades by the General Social Survey, sheds some light on this - and also tells us more about just wh........ Read more »

  • September 2, 2010
  • 02:36 PM
  • 682 views

In a Data-Swamped World, Connecting the Dots Is All Too Easy

by David Berreby in Mind Matters

An information-saturated society is going to notice plenty of weird correlations, like the Blade Runner curse or the unfortunate fate of American presidents elected in years that ended in a zero (for a long time beginning in 1860, all died in office). The more data we collect, the more patterns we see. Iran leads the world in nose-jobs per capita. Major wars have been preceded by stock-market plunges on the other side of the world. It's increasingly easy to find unexpected alignments betw........ Read more »

Berreby, D. (2010) On markets and collective mood. Nature, 467(7311), 31-31. DOI: 10.1038/467031a  

  • September 2, 2010
  • 12:55 PM
  • 683 views

The Science of Sexism: Primate Behavior and the Culture of Sexual Coercion

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by The Intersection at Discover magazine.Despite the advances our society has made for women’s rights and sexual equality during the last century this example is just one more sign of how far we still have to go. It’s not an isolated incident. According to statistics compiled by the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission there were 12,696 workplace sexual harassment cases filed in 2009 (which would be a fraction of the number that actuall........ Read more »

Martin N. Muller and Richard W. Wrangham. (2009) Sexual Coercion in Primates and Humans: An Evolutionary Perspective on Male Aggression Against Females. Harvard University Press. info:/

  • September 2, 2010
  • 12:55 PM
  • 800 views

The Science of Sexism: Primate Behavior and the Culture of Sexual Coercion

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by The Intersection at Discover magazine.Despite the advances our society has made for women’s rights and sexual equality during the last century this example is just one more sign of how far we still have to go. It’s not an isolated incident. According to statistics compiled by the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission there were 12,696 workplace sexual harassment cases filed in 2009 (which would be a fraction of the number that actuall........ Read more »

Martin N. Muller and Richard W. Wrangham. (2009) Sexual Coercion in Primates and Humans: An Evolutionary Perspective on Male Aggression Against Females. Harvard University Press. info:/

  • September 2, 2010
  • 12:17 PM
  • 844 views

Six Months to a Sexy New Body

by Paul Statt in Paul Statt Communications

Public transportation, like, say, public health or the public library, just isn’t sexy. But a fat slob isn’t sexy, either, is he? And with public transportation, he could build a sexy new physique in only 6 to 8 months, according to a recent publication in the the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.... Read more »

MacDonald JM, Stokes RJ, Cohen DA, Kofner A, & Ridgeway GK. (2010) The effect of light rail transit on body mass index and physical activity. American journal of preventive medicine, 39(2), 105-12. PMID: 20621257  

  • September 2, 2010
  • 11:33 AM
  • 496 views

Racial Bias of Adult Sensitivity to Infant Facial Care-Seeking Cues

by Michael Long in Phased

John Hodsoll (Queen Mary University, United Kingdom) and coworkers have shown that preferential adult attention to infant facial features is affected by the race of the infant relative to that of the adult, suggesting an influence of experience and environment. This news feature was written on September 2, 2010.... Read more »

Hodsoll, J., Quinn, K. A., & Hodsoll, S. (2010) Attentional Prioritization of Infant Faces Is Limited to Own-Race Infants. PLoS ONE, 5(9). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0012509

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.