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  • October 14, 2010
  • 09:03 AM
  • 618 views

Time Is Money. Or Is It?

by APS Daily Observations in Daily Observations

Which makes you happier—thinking about time or money? A new study published in Psychological Science finds that people who are made to think about time plan to spend more of ... Read more »

Mogilner, C. (2010) The pursuit of happiness: time, money, and social connection. Psychological science : a journal of the Association for Psychological Science/ APS. PMID: 20732902  

  • October 14, 2010
  • 05:25 AM
  • 456 views

War crimes and the ruin of law

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

From Millennium – Journal of International Studies The Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has acted as a prototype for international criminal justice in the aftermath of violent conflict and stated that ‘those who perpetrate horrific war crimes, genocide, and crimes against humanity will not go unpunished’. It poses the question if such differentiation [...]... Read more »

Dauphinee, E. (2008) War Crimes and the Ruin of Law. Millennium - Journal of International Studies, 37(1), 49-67. DOI: 10.1177/0305829808093730  

  • October 13, 2010
  • 10:59 PM
  • 564 views

The ultimate cause of social disparity in preventative health behavior may be rooted in environmental harm

by Phil Camill in Global Change: Intersection of Nature and Culture

In a fascinating new article in PLOS One (open access), Daniel Nettle asks why we see social gradients in preventative health behaviors:
People of lower socioeconomic position have been found to smoke more, exercise less, have poorer diets, comply less well with therapy, use medical services less, adopt fewer safety measures, ignore health advice more, and [...]... Read more »

  • October 13, 2010
  • 11:55 AM
  • 758 views

Defending the Sensible: Charles Darwin and the Anti-Vivisection Controversy

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted at The Dispersal of Darwin:According to the British Medical Journal it resembled a crucifixion. The dogs were strapped to boards, backs down, and with their legs cinched outwards. In the stifling August heat their heavy panting was made only more intense by a suffocating fear. The accused was described as wearing a white apron “that was afterwards covered with blood” as he approached one of the struggling animals. His mouth was tied shut but ........ Read more »

Feller, D. (2009) Dog fight: Darwin as animal advocate in the antivivisection controversy of 1875. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 40(4), 265-271. DOI: 10.1016/j.shpsc.2009.09.004  

  • October 13, 2010
  • 11:55 AM
  • 629 views

Defending the Sensible: Charles Darwin and the Anti-Vivisection Controversy

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted at The Dispersal of Darwin:According to the British Medical Journal it resembled a crucifixion. The dogs were strapped to boards, backs down, and with their legs cinched outwards. In the stifling August heat their heavy panting was made only more intense by a suffocating fear. The accused was described as wearing a white apron “that was afterwards covered with blood” as he approached one of the struggling animals. His mouth was tied shut but ........ Read more »

Feller, D. (2009) Dog fight: Darwin as animal advocate in the antivivisection controversy of 1875. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 40(4), 265-271. DOI: 10.1016/j.shpsc.2009.09.004  

  • October 13, 2010
  • 05:20 AM
  • 578 views

Male—female pay disparities in Federal employment

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

A major difference? Fields of study and male—female pay differences in federal employment From The American Review of Public Administration Why do men still earn more than equally experienced and educated women in the federal service? This article examines how male–female differences in work experience and education affect pay disparities among college graduates in the federal [...]... Read more »

  • October 13, 2010
  • 03:20 AM
  • 540 views

The History of Smoking Bans & Anti-Smoking Sentiment

by John Wayland in The Darwin Tribune

In the opinion of this Editor, it seems that the smoking bans in force in various nations upon the globe, as well as anti-smoking lobbyists, are a modern occurance which have only popped up in the last few decades as research began to show the harmful effects of smoking, namely lung cancer.It was a suprise therefore to discover that there has been a long history of smoking bans, and anti-smoking sentiment. This article will attempt to explore some of the history of the smoking ban and anti-smoki........ Read more »

  • October 12, 2010
  • 06:01 PM
  • 600 views

New analysis of population trends and their impact on global greenhouse gas emissions

by Phil Camill in Global Change: Intersection of Nature and Culture


In 40 years, there will be about 3 billion additional people living on the Earth (~9.5 billion total) compared with today.   With all of these new folks, it’s easy to think about the added demands of energy, food, and water required to sustain their lifestyles.  And in terms of climate warming, it’s hard to escape [...]... Read more »

O'Neill, B., Dalton, M., Fuchs, R., Jiang, L., Pachauri, S., & Zigova, K. (2010) Global demographic trends and future carbon emissions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(41), 17521-17526. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1004581107  

  • October 12, 2010
  • 09:25 AM
  • 540 views

Can Video Games Train Your Brain?

by APS Daily Observations in Daily Observations

On September 30, the Marian Koshland Science Museum in Washington, DC, held an interactive lecture which posed the question: “Can you train your neural pathways to stay active and strong ... Read more »

  • October 12, 2010
  • 05:30 AM
  • 331 views

Pakistan’s nuclear weapons program and implications for US national security

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

From International Relations Pakistan’s nuclear weapons program causes concern for a variety of reasons and in particular generates threats to US national security. This article outlines how the deep animosity between Pakistan and India has been a key driving force behind the nuclear program. They have fought three major wars against each other: India is [...]... Read more »

  • October 12, 2010
  • 02:21 AM
  • 1,292 views

Video podcasts not ready to replace lectures

by Dr Shock in Dr Shock MD PhD


This disappointing result is recently published online at BMC medical education. Teachers are eager to use new information technology to teach. When I’m doing a lecture at our Med School, these lectures are made to podcasts and posted on Blackboard. Together with the slides students can rehears or listen to the lecture after worths when [...]


Related posts:iTunes can Replace Professors
Book review: Blogs, wikis, podcasts and other powerful web tools for classrooms
Twitter during Lecture........ Read more »

  • October 11, 2010
  • 04:40 PM
  • 925 views

My IVF story: conclusions

by Kate Clancy in Context & Variation

I discuss aging and reproductive health, reproductive choice, and the naturalistic fallacy in my concluding post on IVF.... Read more »

  • October 11, 2010
  • 09:31 AM
  • 1,013 views

The 20th Anniversary of Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom: Natural Language and Natural Selection (1990)

by Michael in A Replicated Typo 2.0


The day before yesterday Wintz mentioned two important birthdays in the field of language evolution (see here): First, Babel’s Dawn turned four, and second, as both Edmund Blair Bolles and Wintz pointed out, Steven Pinker‘s and Paul Bloom‘s seminal paper “Natural Language and Natural Selection” (preprint can be found here) has its 20th anniversary.
Wintz wrote that he . . . → Read More: The 20th Anniversary of Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom: Natural Langua........ Read more »

Pinker, Steven, & Bloom, Paul. (1990) Natural Language and Natural Selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 13(4), 707-726. info:/

  • October 11, 2010
  • 09:05 AM
  • 672 views

Why I'm out online

by Jeremy Yoder in Denim and Tweed

Exactly a year ago today, I came out of the online closet. Now it's another National Coming Out Day, and it seems like as good a time as any to think out loud about why I made that decision.
.flickr-photo { }.flickr-frameright { float: right; text-align: left; margin-left: 15px; margin-bottom: 15px; width:40%;}.flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; } Image borrowed from Wikipedia under fair use rationale.My reasons aren't going to surprise anyone who has even a passing familiarity ........ Read more »

  • October 11, 2010
  • 08:34 AM
  • 1,543 views

Special editorial: Bullying, gay teen suicides, and a need for a solution

by Nestor Lopez-Duran PhD in Child-Psych

A call for support of anti-bullying efforts and the The Safe Schools Improvement Act. Last Sunday a 30 year old gay man was lured into a house in the Bronx where he thought he would be attending a party. Instead, he was tortured and sodomized by a group of teenagers and young adults. He was [...]... Read more »

Vreeman, R., & Carroll, A. (2007) A Systematic Review of School-Based Interventions to Prevent Bullying. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 161(1), 78-88. DOI: 10.1001/archpedi.161.1.78  

  • October 11, 2010
  • 12:23 AM
  • 531 views

Does ecology tell us that some species are worth more than others?

by Noam Ross in Noam Ross

I just read a great paper by Michael Soulé et. al. discussing the management implications some ideas in ecology that have outpaced environmental policy.
The authors, a mix of ecologists and conservationists,  argue that some species, which they call "strongly interacting species," deserve higher priority in conservation because of their unique roles in ecosystems.  These species have gone by many names in the ecological literature, including "keystone species," and "ecosystem en........ Read more »

  • October 10, 2010
  • 09:40 PM
  • 692 views

Are autistic people natural born criminals?

by Michelle Dawson in The Autism Crisis

Associations between autism and notorious violent crimes are easy to find--they seem almost automatic. Here is one example, and another, and one more. There seems to be an entire book on this theme, though I haven't read it.In the scientific literature, you can find powerful deficit models of autism at work in predictions that autistics should disproportionately be violent and prone to criminal behavior. For decades now, examples and claims (just a few here, here, here, here) fitting this predic........ Read more »

Hippler, K., Viding, E., Klicpera, C., & Happé, F. (2009) Brief Report: No Increase in Criminal Convictions in Hans Asperger’s Original Cohort. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 40(6), 774-780. DOI: 10.1007/s10803-009-0917-y  

  • October 10, 2010
  • 06:01 PM
  • 804 views

A new and better way of classifying and managing risks?

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

Risk. The probability of an event occuring and the consequences of the event occuring. Does it have to be like that or is there a different, or perhaps even a better way? [ ... ]... Read more »

  • October 9, 2010
  • 11:04 PM
  • 1,059 views

Testosterone Made Me Gay!

by Ultimo167 in Strong Silent Types

Research by Bao and Swabb (2010), which leans pretty heavily on testosterone's alleged, determinative role in sexual orientation, gender identity, psychopathology,and paedophilia, etc. In staking their considerable claims, the authors dismiss the role of social context on such aforementioned behaviours.... Read more »

Bao AM, & Swaab DF. (2010) Sex differences in the brain, behavior, and neuropsychiatric disorders. The Neuroscientist : a review journal bringing neurobiology, neurology and psychiatry, 16(5), 550-65. PMID: 20889965  

  • October 9, 2010
  • 07:30 AM
  • 717 views

Suicide in American colleges - the importance of existential well being

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

In the past couple of posts I've taken a look at new studies that are exploring the complex relationship between religion and suicide. In general, religious people have lower suicide rates, and these are helping to shed light on why, and also why the relationship is not as straightforward as it sometimes seems.

That's the case too, for this third and final recent study on this topic. It examined suicidal feelings among US college students - a critically important issue given that suicide is the........ Read more »

Taliaferro LA, Rienzo BA, Pigg RM Jr, Miller MD, & Dodd VJ. (2009) Spiritual well-being and suicidal ideation among college students. Journal of American college health : J of ACH, 58(1), 83-90. PMID: 19592357  

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