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  • January 30, 2011
  • 03:52 PM
  • 1,141 views

Smoking and the Slave Trade

by Dirk Hanson in Addiction Inbox


To Africa and back again.

[Queen Nzinga (smoking a pipe) with Her Entourage, Kingdom of Kongo, 1670s]--------->

In the 17th Century, tobacco, the prototypical New World stimulant, was introduced to Africa by European traders. By 1607, tobacco was being cultivated in Sierra Leone, and in 1611 a Swiss doctor commented on how the soldiers of the “Kingdom of Kongo” fought hunger by grinding up tobacco leaves and setting them on fire, “so that a strong smoke is produced, which they inhale........ Read more »

  • January 29, 2011
  • 02:00 PM
  • 1,262 views

Occupational therapy & the cognitive behavioural approach for pain management

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

I have always resisted being labelled. I am much more than my gender, my marital status, my diagnosis, my professional background.  I also feel quite uncomfortable about being told what I may or may not do (maybe that’s where my kids get it from?!). I don’t like being told what is and isn’t ‘my role’ … Read more... Read more »

  • January 29, 2011
  • 01:12 PM
  • 922 views

Waste lands

by Sarah Stephen in An ecological oratorio

Modern cities generate huge amounts of rubbish, and disposing of this is one of the most pressing environmental problems. One can bury it of course, or burn it in incinerators, or just dump it in a big pile just outside the city. This is the approach chosen for the Jardim Gramacho in Rio, Brazil, one of the worlds largest rubbish dumps, which is the subject of the Oscar nominated film, Waste Land.*Seventy percent of Rio's rubbish arrives at Jardim Gramacho, which is an astonishing 7,0........ Read more »

Porto MF, Juncá DC, Gonçalves Rde S, & Filhote MI. (2004) [Garbage, work, and health: a case study of garbage pickers at the metropolitan landfill in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil]. Cadernos de saude publica / Ministerio da Saude, Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Escola Nacional de Saude Publica, 20(6), 1503-14. PMID: 15608851  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 10:16 PM
  • 1,503 views

What is the objective?

by Jason Collins in Evolving Economics

An economist typically bases their economic models on an assumption that the economy is composed of agents who gain utility from consumption. From the beginning of the model, they take consumption  to be the objective and all decisions by the agents aim to maximise their level of consumption within the budget constraint that they face. While I recently posted on how most economists’ fixation on [...]... Read more »

Rubin, P., & Paul II, C. (1979) An Evolutionary Model of Taste for Risk. Economic Inquiry, 17(4), 585-596. DOI: 10.1111/j.1465-7295.1979.tb00549.x  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 01:12 PM
  • 1,277 views

Test the Waters, but Don’t Assume that Bias is Forever: Deepwater Hasn’t Translated to Deep Trouble for Energy Defendants

by Persuasion Strategies in Persuasive Litigator

By: Dr. Shelley Spiecker Six months after the public was riveted to press coverage of the oil spill in the Gulf, impact on energy defendants has been less doomsday than feared. In fact, this is one of the better times in the past 10 years to be an energy defendant in front of a jury. Why? Much as the spill itself appeared to dissipate more rapidly than expected, the tide of public opinion has drifted away from concern over the environmental practices of energy companies, and toward concern over ........ Read more »

  • January 28, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,635 views

Simply Resisting Persuasion: Digressing

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve been doing our series on Simple Jury Persuasion for a while now and thought it might also be good to illustrate some of the most common ways we see people trying to resist persuasion (and then provide you ways to counter their resistance.  Researchers (and even popular writers) have studied this topic for years. [...]


No related posts.... Read more »

Jacks, J., & Cameron, K. (2003) Strategies for Resisting Persuasion. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 25(2), 145-161. DOI: 10.1207/S15324834BASP2502_5  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 01:16 AM
  • 824 views

Science Online 2011: Underrepresentation hurts us all

by Kate Clancy in Context & Variation

In my second year of graduate school, I was in a study group with a few other grad students: in particular I remember a white female student and an Asian-American female student. Somehow we got on the topic of admissions, where we all admitted, jokingly, to feeling like impostors. Then the white female student stated that she didn't believe in affirmative action, and expressed her view with quite a bit of anger. "Besides," she finished, "I just don't see race."I was completely paralyzed, and fel........ Read more »

  • January 28, 2011
  • 12:48 AM
  • 1,253 views

Brand Anthropology: New and Improved, with Extra Diversity!

by gregdowney in Neuroanthropology

Since graduating from high school, I’ve several times worked as a salesman, first flogging reference books door-to-door over summers while an undergraduate and later, while writing my dissertation, getting involved in the ‘design consulting’ business where I helped sell something a lot less tangible.  Sales was a great training ground for an anthropologist: nothing prepares you for quickly manufacturing social relations like slogging around door-to-door with a sample case, and a large lec........ Read more »

Hannerz, U. (2010) Diversity Is Our Business. American Anthropologist, 112(4), 539-551. DOI: 10.1111/j.1548-1433.2010.01274.x  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 12:48 AM
  • 1,140 views

Brand Anthropology: New and Improved, with Extra Diversity!

by Daniel Lende in Neuroanthropology PLoS

Since graduating from high school, I’ve several times worked as a salesman, first flogging reference books door-to-door over summers while an undergraduate and later, while writing my dissertation, getting involved in the ‘design consulting’ business where I helped sell something a lot less tangible.  Sales was a great training ground for an anthropologist: nothing prepares you for quickly manufacturing social relations like slogging around door-to-door with a sample case, and a large lec........ Read more »

Hannerz, U. (2010) Diversity Is Our Business. American Anthropologist, 112(4), 539-551. DOI: 10.1111/j.1548-1433.2010.01274.x  

  • January 27, 2011
  • 08:13 PM
  • 1,263 views

Language learning and height

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Are you tall enough to learn English? Have you ever reflected on the relationship between height and language learning? Well, I haven’t, and I’ve been in language teaching and learning for almost 20 years. So, I assume that most of … Continue reading →... Read more »

Chang, Leslie T. (2009) Factory Girls: From Village to City in a Changing China. Spiegel . info:/

  • January 27, 2011
  • 06:12 PM
  • 1,403 views

Whose Risk Is This? Take Personal Responsibility in Sports Litigation

by Persuasion Strategies in Persuasive Litigator

By: Dr. Kevin Boully “There is danger in all sports, anyone who plays them takes that risk for themselves.” -Mock Juror in recent sports litigation research Athletes choose to play sports that involve risk. Athletic teams, coaches and organizations are aware of the risk just like players So, how much personal responsibility does an individual athlete have for safely participating in his or her chosen sport? What must the player and the organization do to make sure all possible safeguards are........ Read more »

  • January 27, 2011
  • 04:50 PM
  • 978 views

Cortico-thalamic dissociation in Sleep Paralysis

by Daniel Lende in Neuroanthropology PLoS

By Paul Mason
Paul Mason is a PhD student at Macquarie University and frequent contributor to Neuroanthropology.  He is well on his way to finishing his thesis, but occasionally shares his insightful columns on a wide range of topics here.  Please note that the former ‘Fattest Man in the World’ is a different Paul Mason.

Have you ever woken up and not been able to move your body? For those people who have experienced this sensation, it is unnerving, surreal, and often quite stress........ Read more »

Magnin, M., Rey, M., Bastuji, H., Guillemant, P., Mauguiere, F., & Garcia-Larrea, L. (2010) Thalamic deactivation at sleep onset precedes that of the cerebral cortex in humans. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(8), 3829-3833. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0909710107  

  • January 27, 2011
  • 04:50 PM
  • 1,144 views

Cortico-thalamic dissociation in Sleep Paralysis

by gregdowney in Neuroanthropology

By Paul Mason
Paul Mason is a PhD student at Macquarie University and frequent contributor to Neuroanthropology.  He is well on his way to finishing his thesis, but occasionally shares his insightful columns on a wide range of topics here.  Please note that the former ‘Fattest Man in the World’ is a different Paul Mason.

Have you ever woken up and not been able to move your body? For those people who have experienced this sensation, it is unnerving, surreal, and often quite stress........ Read more »

Magnin, M., Rey, M., Bastuji, H., Guillemant, P., Mauguiere, F., & Garcia-Larrea, L. (2010) Thalamic deactivation at sleep onset precedes that of the cerebral cortex in humans. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(8), 3829-3833. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0909710107  

  • January 27, 2011
  • 07:33 AM
  • 986 views

the linguistics of heaven and hell

by Chris in The Lousy Linguist

The value of pop culture data for legitimate research is being put to the test. Exactly what, if anything, can the reality show Big Brother tell us about language change over time?Voice Onset Time is a measure of how long you wait to begin vibrating your vocal folds after you release a stop consonant. Voiced stop consonants like /b/ and /d/ require two things: 1) stop all airflow from escaping the airway by closing the glottis and 2) after the air is released, begin vibrating the glottis (by usi........ Read more »

Max Ban, Peter Graf, & Morgan Sonderegge. (2011) Longitudinal phonetic variation in a closed system. Linguistic Society of America. info:/

  • January 27, 2011
  • 02:00 AM
  • 656 views

‘Celebrity chavs’ like Jordan and Kerry Katona reflect the moral delinquency of white working-class girls

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

‘Celebrity chav’: Fame, femininity and social class   From European Journal of Cultural Studies   Celebrity – ‘the condition of being talked about’ seems an unavoidable part of modern life. In Britain, the media regularly report the bad behavior of celebrities. We have been informed about Jordan’s boozy nights out, Cheryl Cole’s violent attack on [...]... Read more »

Tyler, I., & Bennett, B. (2010) 'Celebrity chav': Fame, femininity and social class. European Journal of Cultural Studies, 13(3), 375-393. DOI: 10.1177/1367549410363203  

  • January 26, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,009 views

Choosing to either disgust your jurors or tick them off

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We know that if we want higher damage awards, we would rather have jurors mad than have them sad. But with all the focus on moral psychology (and particularly disgust) we thought it would make sense to look at whether having disgusted jurors is just as good as having angry jurors. Our hunch was that mad would [...]


Related posts:Eww! That is just disgusting! (but…very interesting)
Legal decisions that tick jurors off
Propaganda, Dogmatism & Bias: Who are your jurors?
... Read more »

Russell, P., & Giner-Sorolla, R. (2010) Moral anger is more flexible than moral disgust. . Social Psychological and Personality Science. info:/

  • January 26, 2011
  • 06:41 AM
  • 680 views

Beauty-is-Good Stereotype in the Brain

by Psychothalamus in Psychothalamus

Leo Tolstoy once said, “It is amazing how complete is the delusion that beauty is goodness.” And how complete is this delusion? In a recent study, Tsukiura & Cabeza (2011) provides an insight into this question by investigating the neural mechanism underlying the Beauty-is-Good stereotype. They were interested in the activity of the medial orbito frontal cortex (associated with positive stimuli, reward processing etc); the insular cortex (associated with negative stimuli, punishment processi........ Read more »

  • January 26, 2011
  • 02:00 AM
  • 756 views

A tale of ‘shacking up’: forces affecting cohabitation

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

Shacking up: an autoethnographic tale of cohabitation From Qualitative Inquiry There is little doubt the landscape of family life has changed over recent decades. As divorce rates thrive and step families are far more common, family relationships may be more complex for many compared to previous generations. This paper is an autoethnographic account of the [...]... Read more »

  • January 25, 2011
  • 02:00 PM
  • 2,243 views

State of the Field: Too big, too small, just right – the Goldilocks Conundrum of Conservation

by Bluegrass Blue Crab in Southern Fried Science

scale can really change perspective... take this fruit fly eye, for example, at scanning electron microscope scale - it looks like an army of hairs Scale seems like a simple term with a simple definition, a concept certainly not up for debate. Well, digging just a little deeper we find that the nuances [...]... Read more »

Jennifer Silver. (2008) Weighing in on scale: synthesizing disciplinary approaches to scale in the context of building interdisciplinary resource management. Society and Natural Resources, 21(10). info:/

  • January 25, 2011
  • 12:11 PM
  • 1,340 views

The Religion Gene (II)

by Cris Campbell in Genealogy of Religion

In his paper purporting to show that a beneficial, baby-making “religion gene” will sweep through a population and eventually make everyone religious, Robert Rowthorn ignores this inconvenient fact: nearly everyone in the world is already religious. Here is how it breaks down:

Because fifty percent of the “Non-Religious” group is theistic but not “religious,” we can [...]... Read more »

Rowthorn, R. (2011) Religion, fertility and genes: a dual inheritance model. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2010.2504  

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