Post List

Social Science posts

(Modify Search »)

  • October 30, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 739 views

Fracking and pregnancy issues (prematurity and high risk pregnancies) 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Risks associated with fracking have been inconsistently documented with the EPA concluding in June 2015 that fracking does not always harm water supplies. “We did not find evidence that these mechanisms have led to widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water resources in the United States. Of the potential mechanisms identified in this report, we found […]

Related posts:
Hydro-fracking and the Environment
Motherhood and Employment: Pregnancy Discrimination in the Workplace
Negotiat........ Read more »

Casey JA, Savitz DA, Rasmussen SG, Ogburn EL, Pollak J, Mercer DG, & Schwartz BS. (2015) Unconventional Natural Gas Development and Birth Outcomes in Pennsylvania, USA. Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.). PMID: 26426945  

  • October 29, 2015
  • 04:00 PM
  • 711 views

Conceptual Knowledge Is Important

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Post moved: http://guzintamath.com/blog/2015/10/conceptual-knowledge-important/

Conceptual fraction and proportion knowledge and procedural fraction and proportion knowledge play a major role in understanding individual differences in proportional word problem-solving performance.... Read more »

  • October 29, 2015
  • 01:59 PM
  • 627 views

What blocks pro-vaccine beliefs?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Despite rhetoric that pits “anti-vaxxers” versus “pro-vaxxers,” most new parents probably qualify as vaccine-neutral–that is, they passively accept rather than actively demand vaccination. Unless there is an active threat of polio or whooping cough, they have to remind themselves that injecting their crying infant with disease antigens is a good thing.... Read more »

Miton, & Mercier. (2015) Cognitive Obstacles to Pro-Vaccination Beliefs. Trends in Cognitive Sciences. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2015.08.007

  • October 28, 2015
  • 08:20 PM
  • 809 views

How common is sexting among married couples?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Earlier this year, we looked at a study that suggested sexting can be healthy in a relationship, but that study primarily looked at non-married couples and the average age for the behavior was, as you may expect, young adult. Which may lead you to think that married couples don’t sext. In fact, married couples do report sexting, but it is much less common than in young adult relationships and consists more of intimate talk with their partners than sending nude or nearly nude photos via mobile ........ Read more »

  • October 27, 2015
  • 06:09 PM
  • 1,265 views

“Made in Germany” at risk? Volkswagen and the German trademark

by Rahel Cramer in Language on the Move

The Volkswagen (VW) emissions scandal has received significant media coverage in and outside of Germany. Besides accounts of the developments that led to the discovery of Volkswagen’s unethical behaviour, the immediate impacts on the company’s finances, CEO Martin Winterkorn’s resignation … Continue reading →... Read more »

Piller, I. (2003) Advertising as a site of language contact. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 170-183. DOI: 10.1017/S0267190503000254  

  • October 26, 2015
  • 07:30 PM
  • 711 views

Researchers create technology to produce lighter, long-lasting batteries from silicon

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Substantially smaller and longer-lasting batteries for everything from portable electronic devices to electric cars could become a reality thanks to an innovative technology developed by University of Waterloo researchers. Zhongwei Chen, a chemical engineering professor at Waterloo, and a team of graduate students have created a low-cost battery using silicon that boosts the performance and life of lithium-ion batteries.... Read more »

  • October 26, 2015
  • 04:00 AM
  • 1,080 views

Sticks and stones (1): How names work & why they hurt

by Michael Ramscar in The Importance of Being Wrong

Boiling a frog In 1781, Christian Wilhelm von Dohm, a civil servant, political writer and historian in what was then Prussia published a two volume work entitled Über die Bürgerliche Verbesserung der Juden (“On the Civic Improvement of Jews”). In it, von Dohm laid out the case for emancipation for a people systematically denied the […]... Read more »

Fryer, R., & Levitt, S. (2004) The Causes and Consequences of Distinctively Black Names. The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 119(3), 767-805. DOI: 10.1162/0033553041502180  

Nunley, J.M., Pugh, A., Romero, N., & Seals, R.A. (2014) An Examination of Racial Discrimination in the Labor Market for Recent College Graduates: Estimates from the Field. Auburn Economics Working Paper Series. info:/

Zajonc, R. (1968) Attitudinal effects of mere exposure. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 9(2), 1-27. DOI: 10.1037/h0025848  

  • October 26, 2015
  • 01:25 AM
  • 1,233 views

A week in review: Top open-access science stories

by Cath Jex in Tak Fur The Kaffe

There's simply not enough time in the week to write about everything that I'd like! So here are 6 extra short summaries of scientific studies published during the past week, available free via open-access journals for anyone and everyone to read and enjoy!... Read more »

Luo J, Ault JS, Shay LK, Hoolihan JP, Prince ED, Brown CA, & Rooker JR. (2015) Ocean Heat Content Reveals Secrets of Fish Migrations. PloS one, 10(10). PMID: 26484541  

  • October 25, 2015
  • 03:27 PM
  • 659 views

Decontaminating infant formula with the bacteriophage

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

When dealing with bacteria, antibiotics are usually the frontrunner, but there are cases where antibiotics are a big no. Take baby formula for instance, we cannot use antibiotics to keep bacteria at bay. This has posed a safety problem in recent years, but researchers have shown that we can use a natural enemy of bacteria to fight back without risk to infants’ health.... Read more »

Lee, J., Bai, J., Shin, H., Kim, Y., Park, B., Heu, S., & Ryu, S. (2015) A Novel Bacteriophage Targeting is a Potential Biocontrol Agent in Foods . Applied and Environmental Microbiology. DOI: 10.1128/AEM.01827-15  

  • October 23, 2015
  • 10:33 PM
  • 708 views

Depression too often reduced to a checklist of symptoms

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

How can you tell if someone is depressed? The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) – the ‘bible’ of psychiatry – diagnoses depression when patients tick off a certain number of symptoms on the DSM checklist. A large-scale quantitative study coordinated at KU Leuven, Belgium, now shows that some symptoms play a much bigger role than others in driving depression, and that the symptoms listed in DSM may not be the most useful ones.... Read more »

  • October 23, 2015
  • 10:25 AM
  • 1,095 views

The Witches In The Rye

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Can the Salem Witches of 1692 be explained by a fungus?... Read more »

Caporael LR. (1976) Ergotism: the satan loosed in Salem?. Science (New York, N.Y.), 192(4234), 21-6. PMID: 769159  

  • October 22, 2015
  • 02:47 PM
  • 611 views

Gene therapy treats all muscles in the body in muscular dystrophy dogs

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Muscular dystrophy, which affects approximately 250,000 people in the U.S., occurs when damaged muscle tissue is replaced with fibrous, fatty or bony tissue and loses function. For years, scientists have searched for a way to successfully treat the most common form of the disease, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), which primarily affects boys. Now, a team of University of Missouri researchers have successfully treated dogs with DMD and say that human clinical trials are being planned in the nex........ Read more »

Yue, Y., Pan, X., Hakim, C., Kodippili, K., Zhang, K., Shin, J., Yang, H., McDonald, T., & Duan, D. (2015) Safe and bodywide muscle transduction in young adult Duchenne muscular dystrophy dogs with adeno-associated virus. Human Molecular Genetics, 24(20), 5880-5890. DOI: 10.1093/hmg/ddv310  

  • October 21, 2015
  • 06:42 PM
  • 684 views

Bacteria communicate like neurons in the brain

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Biologists discovered that bacteria–often viewed as lowly, solitary creatures–are actually quite sophisticated in their social interactions and communicate with one another through similar electrical signaling mechanisms as neurons in the human brain. In the study, scientists detail the manner by which bacteria living in communities communicate with one another electrically through proteins called “ion channels.”... Read more »

  • October 21, 2015
  • 06:00 AM
  • 848 views

Prehistoric Utah Rock Art Does Not Depict a Pterosaur, Study Confirms

by Blake de Pastino in Western Digs

Dealing what they say is a “mortal blow” to the interpretation of some creationists, a team of archaeologists has concluded that a panel of rock art in Utah portrays all manner of fantastic figures, but it does not, in fact, depict a pterosaur.
... Read more »

Le Quellec, J., Bahn, P., & Rowe, M. (2015) The death of a pterodactyl. Antiquity, 89(346), 872-884. DOI: 10.15184/aqy.2015.54  

  • October 21, 2015
  • 05:19 AM
  • 791 views

The Selective Laziness of Reasoning

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

If you could meet yourself, would you always agree with yourself?



You might hope so. But according to a new study, many people will reject their own arguments - if they're tricked into thinking that other people proposed them.



The paper, published in Cognitive Science, is called The Selective Laziness of Reasoning  and it's from cognitive scientists Emmanuel Trouche and colleagues. By "selective laziness", Trouche et al. are referring to our tendency to only bother scrutinizing arg... Read more »

Trouche E, Johansson P, Hall L, & Mercier H. (2015) The Selective Laziness of Reasoning. Cognitive science. PMID: 26452437  

  • October 19, 2015
  • 06:42 PM
  • 612 views

Finding the brain circuitry for gratitude with help from Holocaust survivors’ memories

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Neuroscientists have mapped how the human brain experiences gratitude with help from an unexpected resource: Holocaust survivors’ testimonies. “In the midst of this awful tragedy, there were many acts of bravery and life-saving aid,” said lead author Glenn Fox, a post-doctoral researcher at the Brain and Creativity Institute at USC who led the study. “With […]... Read more »

Fox, G., Kaplan, J., Damasio, H., & Damasio, A. (2015) Neural correlates of gratitude. Frontiers in Psychology. DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01491  

  • October 18, 2015
  • 02:48 PM
  • 574 views

Premature birth appears to weaken brain connections

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Babies born prematurely face an increased risk of neurological and psychiatric problems that may be due to weakened connections in brain networks linked to attention, communication and the processing of emotions, new research shows. Studying brain scans from premature and full-term babies, researchers zeroed in on differences in the brain that may underlie such problems.... Read more »

Rogers C, Herzmann C, Smyser T, Shimony J, Ackerman j, Neil J, & Smyser C. (2015) Impact of preterm birth on structural and functional connectivity in neonates. Society for Neuroscience Annual meeting. info:other/Link

  • October 17, 2015
  • 03:24 PM
  • 564 views

How reward and daytime sleep boost learning

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A new study suggests that receiving rewards as you learn can help cement new facts and skills in your memory, particularly when combined with a daytime nap. The findings from the University of Geneva reveal that memories associated with a reward are preferentially reinforced by sleep. Even a short nap after a period of learning is beneficial.... Read more »

  • October 15, 2015
  • 01:46 PM
  • 656 views

‘Paleo’ style sleep? Think again…

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

It's tempting to believe that people these days aren't getting enough sleep, living as we do in our well-lit houses with TVs blaring, cell phones buzzing, and a well-used coffee maker in every kitchen. But new evidence reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on October 15 shows that three ancient groups of hunter-gatherers--living in different parts of the world without any of those trappings of modern life--don't get any more sleep than we do.... Read more »

Yetish et al. (2015) Natural Sleep and Its Seasonal Variations in Three Pre-industrial Societies. Current Biology. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2015.09.046

  • October 14, 2015
  • 11:57 PM
  • 584 views

What metabolism could reveal about aging and mortality

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Why some people live much longer than others is an enduring mystery. Now, based on a study of a worm, scientists are getting one step closer to understanding longevity. They report that the metabolic profiles of the worms could accurately predict how long they would live and that middle age could be a key turning point.... Read more »

Sarah K. Davies, Jacob G. Bundy, & Armand M. Leroi. (2015) Metabolic Youth in Middle Age: Predicting Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans Using Metabolomics. Journal of proteome research. info:/10.1021/acs.jproteome.5b00442

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SRI Technology.

To learn more, visit http://selfregulationinstitute.org/.