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  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,281 views

Mixture Models for Ordinal Data

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Cumulative probability models are widely used for the analysis of ordinal data. In this article the authors propose cumulative probability mixture models that allow the assumptions of the cumulative probability model to hold within subsamples of the data. The subsamples are defined in terms of latent class membership. In the case of the ordered logit mixture model, on which the authors focus here, the assumption of a logistic distribution for an underlying latent dependent variable holds within ........ Read more »

Breen, R., & Luijkx, R. (2010) Mixture Models for Ordinal Data. Sociological Methods , 39(1), 3-24. DOI: 10.1177/0049124110366240  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 3,434 views

Bisexuality is natural for women

by United Academics in United Academics

Researchers at the Boise State University have found that most women are bisexual by nature. Also, they discovered that these bisexual feelings increase with age. During this study, 484 heterosexual women were surveyed. 60 percent of them said to be sexually attracted to other women, 45 percent had already kissed with a woman en about half of the participants had fantasized about it.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,584 views

Cannabis law has no effect on cannabis use

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction confirms that prohibition does not appear to effect levels of cannabis use in any way... Read more »

The european monitoring centre for drugs and drug addiction. (2011) The state of the drugs problem in Europe . Annual Report. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,228 views

Why speeding neutrinos are interesting for social scientists

by Rense Nieuwenhuis in Curving Normality

In the world as we understand it, based on Einstein, nothing can go faster than light. This prediction based on the general theory of relativity has proven itself countless times in empirical research. And now, lo and behold, a group at CERN has observed neutrino’s racing through earth from France/Switzerland to Italy at the World-record breaking speed of slightly above light-speed!... Read more »

The OPERA Collaboraton: T. Adam, N. Agafonova, A. Aleksandrov, O. Altinok, P. Alvarez Sanchez, A. Anokhina, S. Aoki, A. Ariga, T. Ariga, D. Autiero.... (2011) Measurement of the neutrino velocity with the OPERA detector in the CNGS beam. Arxiv. arXiv: 1109.4897v2

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,400 views

Evolution of "Natural" Sleep

by Cris Campbell in Originus

If you slept well last night and do so regularly, chances are you don’t give sleep much thought. It happens, is pleasurable, and you are refreshed. If you didn’t sleep well last night and do so irregularly, chances are you have given sleep a great deal of thought. It doesn’t happen, isn’t pleasurable, and you are fatigued.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,112 views

Some Members of the Parliament Should Be Selected By Lottery, According to Research

by United Academics in United Academics

What if democracy works better with some members of parliament chosen at random? This is what Athenians used to do in the past, and what a team of Italian researchers at the Università di Catania defend in a paper, now brought back to attention by Marc Abrahams in his weekly column ‘Improbable Research’ at the The Guardian.... Read more »

Pluchino, A., Garofalo, C., Rapisarda, A., Spagano, S., & Caserta, M. (2011) Accidental politicians: How randomly selected legislators can improve parliament efficiency. Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, 390(21-22), 3944-3954. DOI: 10.1016/j.physa.2011.06.028  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,981 views

Some Members of the Parliament Should Be Selected By Lottery, According to Research

by United Academics in United Academics

What if democracy works better with some members of parliament chosen at random? This is what Athenians used to do in the past, and what a team of Italian researchers at the Università di Catania defend in a paper, now brought back to attention by Marc Abrahams in his weekly column ‘Improbable Research’ at the The Guardian.... Read more »

Pluchino, A., Garofalo, C., Rapisarda, A., Spagano, S., & Caserta, M. (2011) Accidental politicians: How randomly selected legislators can improve parliament efficiency. Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, 390(21-22), 3944-3954. DOI: 10.1016/j.physa.2011.06.028  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,824 views

“Beware of Exercise” is a Sexy Headline

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

A new study that raised concerns about exercise should instead raise concerns about obesity.... Read more »

Claude Bouchard, Steven Blair, Timothy Church, Conrad Earnest, James Hagberg, Keijo Häkkinen, Nathan Jenkins, Laura Karavirta, William Kraus, Arthur Leon.... (2012) Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?. PLOS One, 7(5). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,742 views

“Beware of Exercise” is a Sexy Headline

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

A new study that raised concerns about exercise should instead raise concerns about obesity.... Read more »

Claude Bouchard, Steven Blair, Timothy Church, Conrad Earnest, James Hagberg, Keijo Häkkinen, Nathan Jenkins, Laura Karavirta, William Kraus, Arthur Leon.... (2012) Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?. PLOS One, 7(5). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,046 views

“Beware of Exercise” is a Sexy Headline

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

A new study that raised concerns about exercise should instead raise concerns about obesity.... Read more »

Claude Bouchard, Steven Blair, Timothy Church, Conrad Earnest, James Hagberg, Keijo Häkkinen, Nathan Jenkins, Laura Karavirta, William Kraus, Arthur Leon.... (2012) Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?. PLOS One, 7(5). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,133 views

“Survival of the funkiest”, or how to evolve a hit song?

by Michael Czaplinski in Inside the Black Box

Evolving "loops", which are short musical pieces become more attractive under selective pressure from listeners. Some interesting phenomena occur!... Read more »

Robert M. MacCallum, Matthias Mauch, Austin Burt, & Armand M. Leroi. (2012) Evolution of Music by Public Choice. PNAS. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1203182109  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,954 views

3 surprising insights on how food cravings relate to other desires in everyday life

by Ellen van Kleef in Food Intake Control

What is harder to resist? Checking your Twitter or Facebook account at work or eating a delicious, but fattening snack when you try to watch your calories? Both are inner conflicts, best described as 'I really want to do this, but I should not'.

This blog post looks at the paper of Wilhelm Hofmann, Kathlees Vohs and Roy Baummeister who recently tried to answer these questions in their Everyday Temptation Study. ... Read more »

Hofmann W, Baumeister RF, Förster G, & Vohs KD. (2012) Everyday temptations: an experience sampling study of desire, conflict, and self-control. Journal of personality and social psychology, 102(6), 1318-35. PMID: 22149456  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,794 views

Casual Sex: Revisited

by Annemarie van Oosten in United Academics

In my first blog article (“Casual sex: not so casual?”) I wrote about how casual sex (i.e., a sexual interaction between two individuals outside of a long-term committed relationship) is often seen by young adults as a means of starting a relationship. However, things seem to be a bit more complicated (as is often the case with the topic of sexuality), especially for young higher educated women. According to an article by Hamilton and Armstrong (2009), many girls in their early twent........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,887 views

To Bee Or Not To Bee: How Bees Avoid Difficult Choices

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

Humans who are faced with difficult choices are often tempted to simply opt out of making a choice, especially when they realize that they cannot easily resolve their uncertainty as to which choice is the better choice. Some researchers consider this ability to opt out as an indicator of “meta-cognition”, a term used to describe “thinking about thinking”. Instead of plowing ahead with a random choice, humans can recognize that they lack adequate information and choose not........ Read more »

Clint J. Perry, & Andrew B. Barron. (2013) Honey bees selectively avoid difficult choices. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1314571110  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,468 views

How well do people understand their neuropathic pain?

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

When coming to terms with a chronic pain problem, one of the important steps involves obtaining a diagnosis that fits with both the individual’s personal experience of their pain, and also their knowledge (drawn from what is available in the general population). If the label doesn’t square with their experience, people continue searching until they find something that does.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,507 views

How eating several smaller sized chocolates makes you look greedy and impulsive: the unit size effect of indulgent food

by Ellen van Kleef in Food Intake Control

Imagine you are offered a package full of delicious chocolates. Would the size of the pieces of chocolate influences how much you eat?

Yes, it does matter. This blog post is about the unit size effect of indulgent food and why consumers eat less with smaller unit sizes.
... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,572 views

Heroin’s Anthrax Problem

by Rebecca Kreston in BODY HORRORS

Anthrax is a deadly disease with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Because it is, thankfully, also quite rare, it is relatively easy to track its whereabouts and going-ons when an outbreak occurs. Typically, outbreaks of anthrax have been traced to groups of people involved in high-risk activities involving grazing animals and their byproducts: anthrax favors shepherds, butchers, wool-sorters, leather workers, and even the odd drum-playing hippies. In 2009, however, an outbreak upended this........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 822 views

Appearances Can Be Deceiving

by Paco Jariego in Mind the Post

Social behaviours are often contagious, but why do some behaviours spread like wildfire while others remain mostly unseen? The configuration of initial adopters on a social network can systematically skew the observations people make of their friends’ behaviour. This can create the illusion that something is much more popular than it actually is, thus creating conditions for its spread.... Read more »

Kristina Lerman, Xiaoran Yan, & Xin-Zeng Wu. (2015) The Majority Illusion in Social Networks. arxiv. arXiv: 1506.03022v1

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,118 views

Sticks And Stones (Coda) – How Names Work Against Women

by Michael Ramscar in The Importance of Being Wrong

Mothers tell your daughters

From 2011 to December 2015, five women fought the Japanese Government all the way to the country’s Supreme Court. They were seeking to change a law that compels couples to adopt the same surname in order to legally register their marriage. Although the law does not specify whose name it should be, in practice, 96% of couples take the husband’s name, and the women argued that this made the law unconstitutional, since it violated their basic civil rights........ Read more »

Colman, A., Sluckin, W., & Hargreaves, D. (1981) The effect of familiarity on preferences for surnames. British Journal of Psychology, 72(3), 363-369. DOI: 10.1111/j.2044-8295.1981.tb02195.x  

A. Crook. (2012) Personal Names in 18th-Century Scotland: a case study of the parish of Beith (North Ayrshire). Journal of Scottish Name Studies, 1-10. info:/

Shannon, C. (1948) A Mathematical Theory of Communication. Bell System Technical Journal, 27(3), 379-423. DOI: 10.1002/j.1538-7305.1948.tb01338.x  

Shannon, C. (1951) Prediction and Entropy of Printed English. Bell System Technical Journal, 30(1), 50-64. DOI: 10.1002/j.1538-7305.1951.tb01366.x  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,121 views

Productivity Paradox 2.0

by Paco Jariego in Mind the Post

Despite ongoing IT-related innovation, aggregate U.S. productivity growth slowed markedly after 2004. While economists are again unable to find the productivity in their statistics, many people in Silicon Valley think that this slowdown has to be at least in part illusory. Who is right?... Read more »

Byrne, D., Fernald, J., & Reinsdorf, M. (2016) Does the United States have a Productivity Slowdown or a Measurement Problem. Finance and Economics Discussion Series, 2016(017), 1-74. DOI: 10.17016/FEDS.2016.017  

Chad Syverson. (2013) Will History Repeat Itself? Comments on “Is the Information Technology Revolution Over?”. International Productivity Monitor, 37-40. info:/

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