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  • August 12, 2016
  • 06:52 AM
  • 629 views

Discovering a glaring error in a research paper – a personal account

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

New York Magazine has published a great article about how grad student Steven Ludeke tried to correct mistakes in the research of Pete Hatemi and Brad Verhulst. Overall, Ludeke summarises his experience as ‘not recommendable’. Back in my undergraduate years I spotted an error in an article by David DeMatteo and did little to correct it. […]... Read more »

  • August 7, 2016
  • 02:35 PM
  • 566 views

Why you're stiff in the morning: Your body suppresses inflammation when you sleep at night

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Feeling stiff first thing in the morning? It's not your imagination, new research has found a protein created by the body's "biological clock" that actively represses inflammatory pathways within the affected limbs during the night. This protein, called CRYPTOCHROME, has proven anti-inflammatory effects in cultured cells and presents new opportunities for the development of drugs that may be used to treat inflammatory diseases and conditions, such as arthritis.

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Hand, L., Hopwood, T., Dickson, S., Walker, A., Loudon, A., Ray, D., Bechtold, D., & Gibbs, J. (2016) The circadian clock regulates inflammatory arthritis. The FASEB Journal. DOI: 10.1096/fj.201600353R  

  • August 5, 2016
  • 03:10 PM
  • 557 views

From Sci Fi to reality: Unlocking the secret to growing new limbs

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Many lower organisms retain the miraculous ability to regenerate form and function of almost any tissue after injury. Humans share many of our genes with these organisms, but our capacity for regeneration is limited. So scientists are studying the genetics of these organisms to find out how regenerative mechanisms might be activated in humans.

... Read more »

  • August 4, 2016
  • 02:07 PM
  • 652 views

Biomimicry is a promising approach for driving innovation

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A new case study shows that biomimicry, a relatively new field that seeks to emulate nature to find solutions to human problems, can potentially expand intellectual property, increase energy savings and accelerate product innovation.

... Read more »

Emily Barbara Kennedy, & Thomas Andrew Marting. (2016) Biomimicry: Streamlining the Front End of Innovation for Environmentally Sustainable Products. Research-Technology Management. info:/10.1080/08956308.2016.1185342

  • August 3, 2016
  • 06:02 PM
  • 589 views

How to excel at academic conferences in 5 steps

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Academic conferences have been the biggest joy of my PhD and so I want to share with others how to excel at this academic tradition.  The author (second from right, with can) at his first music cognition conference (SMPC 2013 in Toronto) which – despite appearances – he attended by himself. 1) Socialising A conference […]... Read more »

  • August 3, 2016
  • 02:40 PM
  • 655 views

Instructions to authors of Health Science journals: what do they communicate?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Instructions to authors (IA) allegedly contain all necessary and sufficient information to guide authors on the correct submission of a manuscript to a journal. Actually, however, a huge diversity of contents not always fulfills that purpose. In this post, we analyze the instructions to authors of SciELO Brazil Health Science journals, as well as literature on the subject. … Read More →... Read more »

Schriger, D., Arora, S., & Altman, D. (2006) The Content of Medical Journal Instructions for Authors. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 48(6), 743-7490000. DOI: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2006.03.028  

Gasparyan, A., Ayvazyan, L., Gorin, S., & Kitas, G. (2014) Upgrading instructions for authors of scholarly journals. Croatian Medical Journal, 55(3), 271-280. DOI: 10.3325/cmj.2014.55.271  

Probst, P., Hüttner, F., Klaiber, U., Diener, M., Büchler, M., & Knebel, P. (2015) Thirty years of disclosure of conflict of interest in surgery journals. Surgery, 157(4), 627-633. DOI: 10.1016/j.surg.2014.11.012  

Bossuyt, P., Reitsma, J., Bruns, D., Gatsonis, C., Glasziou, P., Irwig, L., Lijmer, J., Moher, D., Rennie, D., de Vet, H.... (2015) STARD 2015: an updated list of essential items for reporting diagnostic accuracy studies. BMJ. DOI: 10.1136/bmj.h5527  

  • July 27, 2016
  • 03:38 PM
  • 689 views

eBooks – global market and trends – Part III – Final: The publication of printed and digital books in the global context

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The e-book Global report shows that the traditional model based on large publishing houses was insufficient to incorporate the possibilities of technological advances. On the one hand, the new reading models through smartphones and subscription platforms and on the other hand, self-publishing of ebooks open opportunities to both individual authors and non-profit organizations in the educational field to produce and distribute their own works at low cost and minimal infrastructure requirements. &........ Read more »

WISCHENBART, R.,, & et al. (2016) Global eBook: a report on market trends an developments. Rüdiger Wischenbart Content and Consulting (RWCC). info:/

  • July 23, 2016
  • 05:30 PM
  • 599 views

Brain activity and response to food cues differ in severely obese women

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The brain's reward centers in severely obese women continue to respond to food cues even after they've eaten and are no longer hungry, in contrast to their lean counterparts. The study compared attitudes and the brain activity of 15 severely obese women (those with a body mass index greater than 35) and 15 lean women (those with a BMI under 25).

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Puzziferri, N., Zigman, J., Thomas, B., Mihalakos, P., Gallagher, R., Lutter, M., Carmody, T., Lu, H., & Tamminga, C. (2016) Brain imaging demonstrates a reduced neural impact of eating in obesity. Obesity, 24(4), 829-836. DOI: 10.1002/oby.21424  

  • July 22, 2016
  • 03:38 PM
  • 628 views

When it comes to empathy, don't always trust your gut

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Ever feel like someone is hiding something? Or maybe you suddenly feel like you can't trust a co-worker. The feeling may seem logical, but is empathy the result of gut intuition or careful reasoning? Research suggests that, contrary to popular belief, the latter may be more the case.

... Read more »

  • July 21, 2016
  • 03:01 PM
  • 641 views

Artificial muscle for soft robotics: Low voltage, high hopes

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Soft robots do a lot of things well but they're not exactly known for their speed. The artificial muscles that move soft robots, called actuators, tend to rely on hydraulics or pneumatics, which are slow to respond and difficult to store.

... Read more »

  • July 20, 2016
  • 04:03 PM
  • 735 views

How Open Access can boost researchers’ careers

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Full adoption of open access has not been achieved mainly because researchers are not yet totally convinced that this type of publication will do for their careers the same as the subscription journals. A detailed review article published in eLife shows that open research brings many benefits to researchers and it is associated with increased citations, media attention, potential collaboration and funding and jobs opportunities. … Read More →... Read more »

McKiernan, E., Bourne, P., Brown, C., Buck, S., Kenall, A., Lin, J., McDougall, D., Nosek, B., Ram, K., Soderberg, C.... (2016) How open science helps researchers succeed. eLife. DOI: 10.7554/eLife.16800  

KIERNAN, V. (2003) Diffusion of News about Research. Science Communication, 25(1), 3-13. DOI: 10.1177/1075547003255297  

Vincent Lariviere, Veronique Kiermer, Catriona J MacCallum, Marcia McNutt, Mark Patterson, Bernd Pulverer, Sowmya Swaminathan, Stuart Taylor, Stephen Curry. (2016) A simple proposal for the publication of journal citation distributions. bioRxiv. DOI: http://dx.org/10.1101/062109  

  • July 20, 2016
  • 04:02 PM
  • 628 views

How our brain puts the world in order

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The world around is complex and changing constantly. To put it in order, we devise categories into which we sort new concepts. To do this we apply different strategies. A team of researchers wanted to find out which areas of the brain regulate these strategies. The results of their study using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show that there are indeed particular brain areas, which become active when a certain strategy of categorisation is applied.

... Read more »

  • July 19, 2016
  • 04:08 PM
  • 513 views

Protein found to bolster growth of damaged muscle tissue

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Biologists have found that a protein that plays a key role in the lives of stem cells can bolster the growth of damaged muscle tissue, a step that could potentially contribute to treatments for muscle degeneration caused by old age and diseases such as muscular dystrophy. The results show that a particular type of protein called integrin is present on the stem cell surface and used by stem cells to interact with, or "sense" their surroundings.

... Read more »

  • July 18, 2016
  • 08:30 PM
  • 787 views

Interleaving Study Is Not Interleaving Learning

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Post moved: http://guzintamath.com/blog/2016/07/interleaving-learning/

In the latest research, the authors found that a blocked schedule (presenting examples from one category at a time) outperformed an interleaved schedule (interspersing examples from all the categories) for category learning when the examples to be classified were more highly discriminable. This result was consistent across the two experiments in the study (p = 0.055 and p = 0.04). Importantly, however, although interleavin........ Read more »

  • July 18, 2016
  • 03:20 PM
  • 673 views

Secrets of the human brain unlocked

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Human intelligence is being defined and measured for the first time ever. Researchers have been recently undertaken to quantify the brain's dynamic functions, and identify how different parts of the brain interact with each other at different times - namely, to discover how intellect works.

... Read more »

  • July 17, 2016
  • 03:08 PM
  • 726 views

Specialized neurons in emotional memory play important role in fear

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Fear memory encoding, the process responsible for persistent reactions to trauma-associated cues, is influenced by a sparse but potent population of inhibitory cells called parvalbumin-interneurons (PV-INs) in the amygdala, according to a new study.

... Read more »

  • July 16, 2016
  • 04:45 PM
  • 538 views

Reopening avenues for attacking ALS

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Researchers have found evidence that bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to a subset of patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

... Read more »

Burberry, A., Suzuki, N., Wang, J., Moccia, R., Mordes, D., Stewart, M., Suzuki-Uematsu, S., Ghosh, S., Singh, A., Merkle, F.... (2016) Loss-of-function mutations in the C9ORF72 mouse ortholog cause fatal autoimmune disease. Science Translational Medicine, 8(347), 347-347. DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aaf6038  

  • July 16, 2016
  • 04:06 PM
  • 574 views

Blogs, Papers, Plagiarism and Bitcoin

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Retraction Watch reports on a strange case of alleged plagiarism.

In February 2016, F1000Research published a paper called How blockchain-timestamped protocols could improve the trustworthiness of medical science. The authors, Greg Irving and John Holden, demonstrated the use of the bitcoin blockchain as a way of publicly verifying the existence of a certain document at a certain point in time. This approach, they say, could be used to make preregistered research protocols more secure. A prob... Read more »

  • July 15, 2016
  • 02:24 PM
  • 594 views

Repeated stimulation treatment can restore movement to paralyzed muscles

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Conducted at the BioMag laboratory at the Helsinki University Hospital, a new patient study could open a new opportunity to rehabilitate patients with spinal cord damage. In a new study which two patients with spinal cord injuries received a form of treatment that combined transcranial magnetic stimulation with simultaneous peripheral nerve stimulation given repeatedly for nearly six months.

... Read more »

  • July 14, 2016
  • 03:58 PM
  • 811 views

Organic computers are coming

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Move over silicon, tomorrow's computers could be made of something completely different. A team of international researchers managed to find a molecule that, to their opinion, could give the impetus to the development of organic electronics.

... Read more »

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