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  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,222 views

Let’s Get Cellular: Meth Metabolism

by Dirk Hanson in Addiction Inbox

We know from the work of Nora Volkow and others that meth abusers have chronically low levels of dopamine D2 receptors in their brains. But what is going on in the rest of the body when methamphetamine addiction is running full force?... Read more »

Sun, L., Li, H., Seufferheld, M., Walters, K., Margam, V., Jannasch, A., Diaz, N., Riley, C., Sun, W., Li, Y.... (2011) Systems-Scale Analysis Reveals Pathways Involved in Cellular Response to Methamphetamine. PLoS ONE, 6(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0018215  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,843 views

Why caffeine jacks you up

by DJ in Neuropoly

Recapping a cool study that locates where the receptors underlying the arousing effects of caffeine live in the brain....... Read more »

Lazarus M, Shen HY, Cherasse Y, Qu WM, Huang ZL, Bass CE, Winsky-Sommerer R, Semba K, Fredholm BB, Boison D.... (2011) Arousal Effect of Caffeine Depends on Adenosine A2A Receptors in the Shell of the Nucleus Accumbens. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 31(27), 10067-10075. PMID: 21734299  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,826 views

2011: The Year in Drugs Deaths and data fraud

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

A look at the biggest drugs news stories of the year and a statistical analysis of drugs deaths this year.... Read more »

Measham,F. Moore, K. Østergaard, J. (2011) Mephedrone, ‘‘Bubble’’ and unidentified white powders: the contested identities of synthetic ‘‘legal highs". DRUGS AND ALCOHOL TODAY, 137-146. info:/

Editorial team. (2010) The EMCDDA annual report 2010: the state of the drugs problem in Europe. The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, also published in Euro surveillance :European communicable disease bulletin, 15(46). PMID: 21144426  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,596 views

Is this journal for real?

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

This year 134 suspect new journals have appeared from the abyss, all published by the same clandestine company “Scientific & Academic Publishing, USA“... Read more »

Morrison, Heather. (2012) Scholarly Communication in Crisis. Freedom for scholarship in the internet age. Simon Fraser University School of Communication. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,163 views

Synthesising Pseudoephedrine From N-Methylamphetamine

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

The paper describes how “in the past most stores were able to sell pseudoephedrine”, the US’s most popular decongestant but new laws require pharmacies, often with restricted opening hours to sell the medicine only to those carrying government issued ID. The paper argues that “it would be of great interest to have a simple synthesis of pseudoephedrine from reagents which can be more readily procured”. The study is published in the splendidly titled Journal of Apocry........ Read more »

Hai, O. Hakkenshit, I.B. (2012) A Simple and Convenient Synthesis of Pseudoephedrine From N-Methylamphetamine. Journal of Apocryphal Chemistry, 213-21. info:/1F.1BC9/b00000F00A

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,686 views

Your Good Side Is the Left Side, According to Science

by United Academics in United Academics

Don’t give it any more thought: according to scientists, left side of the face usually looks better, mainly because it’s more expressive than the right side. Researchers at the Wake Forest University showed a series of photographs to 37 people, some of them mirror-reversed, so the viewers wouldn’t know which side they were looking at. In most cases, they chose the left side no matter where it was in the picture.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,776 views

“Beware of Exercise” is a Sexy Headline

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

A new study that raised concerns about exercise should instead raise concerns about obesity.... Read more »

Claude Bouchard, Steven Blair, Timothy Church, Conrad Earnest, James Hagberg, Keijo Häkkinen, Nathan Jenkins, Laura Karavirta, William Kraus, Arthur Leon.... (2012) Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?. PLOS One, 7(5). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,682 views

“Beware of Exercise” is a Sexy Headline

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

A new study that raised concerns about exercise should instead raise concerns about obesity.... Read more »

Claude Bouchard, Steven Blair, Timothy Church, Conrad Earnest, James Hagberg, Keijo Häkkinen, Nathan Jenkins, Laura Karavirta, William Kraus, Arthur Leon.... (2012) Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?. PLOS One, 7(5). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,217 views

The Role of Feedback Is Overemphasized, Says Researcher

by United Academics in United Academics

No matter if it’s good or bad; when it comes to difficult decision-making tasks, feedback may make things even more confusing, according to new research published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience.... Read more »

Osman, M. (2012) The role of feedback in dynamic decision making. Frontiers in Decision Neuroscience. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,606 views

a little bit of unpredictable stress everyday

by Mitchell Harden in Mitch's Blog

That is the recipe for depression. Chronic Mild Stress (CMS). Or at least it is the recipe I used to depress rats. As I mentioned earlier I worked with rats to research the mood-effects of Salvia. One important piece of this research was the idea that a depressed brain is different than a healthy brain and may respond differently to drug exposure. So in order to apply that in rats, I needed a way to create depressed rats. For me, that meant using CMS.
... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,634 views

Stress Leaves Its Mark on Dad’s Sperm

by Anouk Vleugels in United Academics

For the first time, researchers have found that stress can leave an epigenetic mark on sperm, which then alters the offspring’s hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a part of the brain that deals with responding to stress. The study was published in the Journal of Neuroscience.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,175 views

I WILL FEAR NO EVIL: THE FIRST HEAD TRANSPLANT ON HUMAN

by Eugenio Maria Battaglia in Science to Grok

In 2008, doctor Sergio Canavero, an italian neurosurgeon based in Turin, IT, have awakened a 20 years old lady from a permanent post-traumatic vegetative state, by means of a bifocal extradural cortical electro-stimulation. Today, while Science still find it hard to explain consciousness and embodied cognition – the world-class neurosurgeon made a shock announcement: “I’m ready for the first head transplant on a man.”

In the manuscript published on Surgical Neurology I........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,157 views

Spontaneous Alternation for T Maze, Y Maze

by Adam Maze Engineers in Maze Engineers

Spontaneous alternation behavior (SAB) is a fancy, sciency way of describing the natural tendency of animals (specifically mice/rats/rodents) to alternate which arms of a maze they choose to check out. Unlike the tests for reference and working memory that we discussed last week, when studying spatial memory through observation of spontaneous alternation behavior, the arms of the mazes do not contain any reward. Mice are simply put into the maze, allowed to explore, and their sequence of choices........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,090 views

Tit for tet: Tet3 regulates neuron activity through epigenetic changes

by Betty Zou in Eat, Read, Science

Tet3 regulates neuronal activity through epigenetic changes in the cells' DNA. It alters the speed and ease with which neurons communicate by altering the number of receptors at the synapse.... Read more »

Yu H, Su Y, Shin J, Zhong C, Guo JU, Weng YL, Gao F, Geschwind DH, Coppola G, Ming GL.... (2015) Tet3 regulates synaptic transmission and homeostatic plasticity via DNA oxidation and repair. Nature neuroscience, 18(6), 836-43. PMID: 25915473  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,071 views

‘Hotspots’ for DNA breakage in neurons may promote brain genetic diversity, disease

by Tom Ulrich in Vector, a Boston Children's Hospital blog

As organs go, the brain seems to harbor an abundance of somatic mutations — genetic variants that arise after conception and affect only some of our neurons. In one recent study, researchers found about 1,500 variants in each of neurons they sampled.

New research revealing the propensity of DNA to break in certain spots backs up the idea of a genetically diverse brain. Reported in Cell last month, it also suggests a new avenue for thinking about brain development, brain tumors and neuro........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 785 views

The geometry of consciousness is a multi-dimensional math trip

by amanda alvarez in It Ain't Magic

Amanda Alvarez writes about how neuroscientists are studying consciousness with mathematics.... Read more »

Oizumi M, Tsuchiya N, & Amari SI. (2016) Unified framework for information integration based on information geometry. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 113(51), 14817-14822. PMID: 27930289  

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