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  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:32 PM
  • 798 views

New Species of Hero Shrew

by Jim Ryan in Wild Mammals

Scientists at Chicago's Field Museum and international collaborators have described a new species of Hero Shrew – the mammal with the most bizarre lower spine on Earth. The interlocking vertebrae of the Hero Shrew render the spine four to five times more robust relative to body mass, a condition not found in any other mammal.

...This new species of Hero Shrew, named Scutisorex thori, possesses features that may represent intermediate character states between the only other known Hero S........ Read more »

  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:32 PM
  • 732 views

Military Sonar Alters Whale Behavior

by Jim Ryan in Wild Mammals

Some blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) off the coast of California change their behavior when exposed to the sort of underwater sounds used during U.S. military exercises. The whales may alter diving behavior or temporarily avoid important feeding areas, according to new research by the Southern California Behavioral Response Study.


Researchers exposed tagged blue whales in the California Bight to simulated mid-frequency (3.5-4 kHz) sonar sounds significantly less intense than the militar........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,743 views

Water For Elephants...In The Wild

by Shermin de Silva in Maximus

Elephants' water requirements may provide the key to detecting them in areas that are difficult to census.... Read more »

Pastorini,J., Nishantha, H.G., Janaka, H.K., Isler, K., & Fernando, P. (2010) Jennifer Pastorini, H.G. Nishantha, H.K. Janaka, Karin Isler, . Tropical Conservation Science, 3(4), 412-422. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,864 views

Diversity: It Matters! (for plants & algae)

by jebyrnes in I'm a chordata, urochordata!

Geological time has witnessed 5 extinction crises. Now we're in the middle of the 6th - this time driven by man. What's unprecedented, however, is the rate we are driving species extinct. For many taxa, it's faster than we've seen in geological time (see here for discussion).

So? Will vast reductions in the diversity of species on earth matter? I mean, heck, maybe we only need two or three of each taxa, and we’re all good. Or maybe not…

This question has ........ Read more »

Cardinale, B., Matulich, K., Hooper, D., Byrnes, J., Duffy, E., Gamfeldt, L., Balvanera, P., O'Connor, M., & Gonzalez, A. (2011) The functional role of producer diversity in ecosystems. American Journal of Botany, 98(3), 572-592. DOI: 10.3732/ajb.1000364  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,949 views

The Comeback Cove

by Whitney Campbell in Green Screen

Great news for conservation is always exciting, so when I read about a remarkable wildlife rebound in this month's issue of PLoS ONE, I couldn't resist sharing it here. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 3,213 views

xxx

by xxx in Anole Annals

xxx... Read more »

Kirsten E. Nicholson and Paul M. Richards. (2011) Home-range size and overlap within an introduced population of the Cuban Knight Anole, Anolis equestris (Squamata: Iguanidae). Phyllomedusa, 10(1), 65-73. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,583 views

Copyright vs Medicine: If this topic isn’t covered in your newspaper this weekend, get a new newspaper

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

After thirty years of silence, authors of a standard clinical psychiatric bedside test have issued take down orders of new medical research. Doctors who use copies of the bedside test which will have been printed in some of their oldest medical textbooks are liable to be sued for up to $150,000.... Read more »

Newman, J., & Feldman, R. (2011) Copyright and Open Access at the Bedside. New England Journal of Medicine, 365(26), 2447-2449. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp1110652  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,672 views

Is this journal for real?

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

This year 134 suspect new journals have appeared from the abyss, all published by the same clandestine company “Scientific & Academic Publishing, USA“... Read more »

Morrison, Heather. (2012) Scholarly Communication in Crisis. Freedom for scholarship in the internet age. Simon Fraser University School of Communication. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,738 views

Bioplastics in Bloom

by Whitney Campbell in Green Screen

When imagining the world without a dependence on petroleum, I tend to think of objects like solar panels, electric cars, and wind turbines — the things that could potentially replace the parts of the current oil-energy infrastructure. But what about the other items made from petroleum that could be replaced by alternative materials? What about bicycle tires, nail polishes, compact discs, surf boards, lipsticks, tool boxes, and shower curtains?... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 3,161 views

Climate change causes species to move north and to higher elevations

by brettcherry in Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog

How climate change is causing species in the temperate zone of the northern hemisphere to move on average 12.2 metres higher in elevation per decade and northwards 17.6 kilometres per decade. Species are moving the most in regions showing the highest levels of warming, but some are more influenced by climate change than others... Read more »

Chen IC, Hill JK, Ohlemüller R, Roy DB, & Thomas CD. (2011) Rapid range shifts of species associated with high levels of climate warming. Science (New York, N.Y.), 333(6045), 1024-6. PMID: 21852500  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,765 views

Wind Power Is Enough to Meet Global Energy Demand: Research

by Jaime Menchén in United Academics

New research published in Nature Climate Change shows that power generated by surface and high-altitude winds can meet the global energy demands with a low environmental effect.... Read more »

Kate Marvel, Ben Kravitz, & Ken Caldeira. (2012) Geophysical limits to global wind power. Nature Climate Change. DOI: 10.1038/nclimate1683  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,047 views

Nature is saving a huge amount of our Money

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

A large number of people in this world don’t know that they have a very huge amount of servants working for them on the planet Earth and beyond this planet at no cost while giving them infinite benefits. Those workers are present everywhere, we know some of them and we don’t know many of them.



Economic value of some bodily functions:

You can’t see your stomach but there are many bacteria working for you without any cost. They are serving you in give and take relations........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,715 views

Nature is saving a huge amount of our Money

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

A large number of people in this world don’t know that they have a very huge amount of servants working for them on the planet Earth and beyond this planet at no cost while giving them infinite benefits. Those workers are present everywhere, we know some of them and we don’t know many of them.



Economic value of some bodily functions:

You can’t see your stomach but there are many bacteria working for you without any cost. They are serving you in give and take relations........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,889 views

Spiders as catalysts for ecosystem development

by Chris Buddle in Arthropod Ecology

In this post, the role of spiders in the development of ecosystems is discussed, especially in light of their ability to colonize habitats rapidly. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,410 views

The case of the missing genitalia: copulation costs for male spiders

by Chris Buddle in Arthropod Ecology

Male spiders can be missing their organs (pedipalps) and this is clearly quite a cost for their fitness! This post explores this topic, with some original data, and with some discussion of past literature on the topic.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,358 views

Switchgrass over corn? The argument for maintaining ecological diversity

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Switchgrass and prairie grass may produce less biofuel yield than corn, but provide a host of long-term ecological and greenhouse gas benefits that make them more desirable choices for biofuel production... Read more »

BP Werling, TL Dickson, R Isaacs, H Gainesv, C Gratton, KL Gross, H Liere, CM Malmstrom, TD Meehan, L Ruan, BA Robertson, GP Robertson, TM Schmidt, AC Schrotenboer, TK Teal, JK Wilson, DA Landis. (2014) Perennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes. PNAS. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1309492111  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,306 views

Rerouting Ships Can Save Billions for Offshore Wind

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Rerouting ships to open up areas for offshore wind development could save billions of dollars in construction and operating costs for the renewable energy source, according to new findings by the University of Delaware’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment (CEOE).... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,766 views

How sex-engineered prawns can be used to fight deadly parasite

by This Science is Crazy! in This Science Is Crazy!

Scientists float the idea of introducing male-only prawn stocks to Senegal river to control spread of snails which act as vector for blood flukes... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,359 views

Spatial variations in mortality in pelagic early life stages of a marine fish (Gadus morhua)

by Øystein Langangen in Marine Science blog

Mortality of pelagic eggs and larvae of marine fish is often assumed to be constant both in space and time due to lacking information. This may, however, be a gross oversimplification, as early life stages are likely to experience large variations in mortality both in time and space.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,379 views

How to make rice better for you and the environment

by Betty Zou in Eat, Read, Science

An innovative way of rice preparation that removes more arsenic than the conventional method of cooking and a new strain of high-starch, low-methane rice are discussed.... Read more »

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