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  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,022 views

in indirect support of the hygiene hypothesis

by Ragamuffin in How We Are Hungry

A recent study out of the University of Michigan Medical School suggests that the stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori protects against inflammation caused by Salmonella in a mouse model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,105 views

Let’s Get Cellular: Meth Metabolism

by Dirk Hanson in Addiction Inbox

We know from the work of Nora Volkow and others that meth abusers have chronically low levels of dopamine D2 receptors in their brains. But what is going on in the rest of the body when methamphetamine addiction is running full force?... Read more »

Sun, L., Li, H., Seufferheld, M., Walters, K., Margam, V., Jannasch, A., Diaz, N., Riley, C., Sun, W., Li, Y.... (2011) Systems-Scale Analysis Reveals Pathways Involved in Cellular Response to Methamphetamine. PLoS ONE, 6(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0018215  

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 3,029 views

Friday Weird Science GUEST POST: The distance between your testicles and your anus, 'taint unimportant

by Allie Wilkinson in OH, FOR THE LOVE OF SCIENCE!

A Friday Weird Science guest post on Neurotic Physiology takes a humorous look at anogenital distance and its implication for fertility in adult males.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 3,493 views

Bisexuality is natural for women

by United Academics in United Academics

Researchers at the Boise State University have found that most women are bisexual by nature. Also, they discovered that these bisexual feelings increase with age. During this study, 484 heterosexual women were surveyed. 60 percent of them said to be sexually attracted to other women, 45 percent had already kissed with a woman en about half of the participants had fantasized about it.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,773 views

Nature is saving a huge amount of our Money

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

A large number of people in this world don’t know that they have a very huge amount of servants working for them on the planet Earth and beyond this planet at no cost while giving them infinite benefits. Those workers are present everywhere, we know some of them and we don’t know many of them.



Economic value of some bodily functions:

You can’t see your stomach but there are many bacteria working for you without any cost. They are serving you in give and take relations........ Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 987 views

Ultrasound might increase autism severity

by vitul in Think, Ask and Resolve

According to a study by University of Washington researchers, diagnostic ultrasound in the first trimester of pregnancy is linked to increased autism severity in the child.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,733 views

Simpler LCP-based crystallization

by Peter Nollert in Protein Crystallization Blog

For all those that are interested in simplifying membrane protein crystallization trials, you may want to check out this paper on the topic of 'simplifying LCP-based crystallization':

Wallace E, Dranow D, Laible PD, Christensen J, & Nollert P (2011). Monoolein lipid phases as incorporation and enrichment materials for membrane protein crystallization. PloS one, 6 (8) PMID: 21909395... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,395 views

Comparing Apples with Oranges: B&W

by Peter Nollert in Protein Crystallization Blog

Identifying individual amino acid residues within a GPCR and comparing these across different receptors is a routine task that’s helped by a widely accepted nomenclature system: that of Ballesteros and Weinstein.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,172 views

“Survival of the funkiest”, or how to evolve a hit song?

by Michael Czaplinski in Inside the Black Box

Evolving "loops", which are short musical pieces become more attractive under selective pressure from listeners. Some interesting phenomena occur!... Read more »

Robert M. MacCallum, Matthias Mauch, Austin Burt, & Armand M. Leroi. (2012) Evolution of Music by Public Choice. PNAS. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1203182109  

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,443 views

Making sense of a small worm from big data

by Michael Hsieh in Hsieh Lab Blog

We recently published a gene expression microarray-based paper in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. As a "reductionist", it was challenging for me to deal with the massive amount of data associated with the paper. ... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,309 views

Methylomes in Lethal Prostate Cancer Support Personalized Medicine

by Nicole Kelesoglu in E3 Engaging Epigenetics Experts

Description of new Science Translational Medicine pub out of Johns Hopkins. Epigenetic profiling of metastatic prostate cancer reveals that epigenetic biomarkers are worth the search.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,424 views

Methylomes in Lethal Prostate Cancer Support Personalized Medicine

by Nicole Kelesoglu in E3 Engaging Epigenetics Experts

Recent surprising evidence has shown that metastatic tumors usually do not vary in their genomes within an individual. Yet, these tumors behave differently at different sites around the body. Does that mean that epigenetic profiling will be too variable to target for cancer treatment? In a word, no.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,847 views

Tadpoles see through their asses

by Papes in Sick Papes

A compelling example of the brain’s dynamic ballsiness (i.e., the ability of neural circuits to learn to detect unfamiliar sensory stimuli), is described in a recent exercise in sickness by the duo of Blackiston and Levin. ... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,381 views

Three Top Redox-Reagents for preventing protein oxidation

by Vicky Doronina in Protein Solubility Blog

Intact cells contain enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems, which counteract amino acid oxidation by reactive oxygen species from the air and chemical reactions and return them into unmodified state. However, after you break the cells, the anti-oxidation systems are gone and you have to supply excess of external antioxidants. In general, the concentration of the reducing agent should be more than your protein concentration. The good old dithiothreitol (DTT) or β-mercaptoethanol (BME) are no........ Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,222 views

The good, bad, and ugly of protein refolding

by Scott Jeffers in Protein Solubility Blog

The good news is that 95% of the protein aggregates in the inclusion body are your protein of interest. To get a 95% pure sample of protein you just have to lyse the cells using your preferred method (sonication works well, as does French press) in a lyses buffer containing Triton X-100. You then centrifuge your inclusion bodies containing your aggregated protein and discard the soluble supernatant. Next, you wash your inclusion body pellet in lysis buffer without Triton X-100 to remove the dete........ Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,280 views

IS THIS A BANANA I SEE BEFORE ME? SEEING COLOURS THAT AREN’T THERE

by A Giffen in Antisense Science

We all know that bananas are yellow, strawberries are red and oranges are…well orange. But what about a black and white banana? Or a grayscale green bean? Well it turns out our brain still processes these images in the colour we think they should be in.Banana

In a study carried out earlier this year, neuroscientists showed there was a link between our memories, our knowledge of object colour and the way neuronal networks in the brain perceive the object when presented in black and whit........ Read more »

Bannert MM, & Bartels A. (2013) Decoding the Yellow of a Gray Banana. Current biology : CB. PMID: 24184103  

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,353 views

Supercomputers, The Human Brain and the Advent of Computational Biology

by JB Sheppard in Antisense Science

Recent developments in computational neuroscience and the modelling of biological systems prompted a look at how advanced our simulations of living systems are today. ... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,970 views

Honeypot Ants - Live food storage units

by beredim in Strange Animals

Honey ants are a weird class of ant-workers that engorge themselves with food. Overtime, their abdomen gets as big as a grape. In times of need, they will either regurgitate the stored liquid or sacrifice themselves to feed the rest of the colony. ... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,098 views

The Australian Turtle Frog

by beredim in Strange Animals

The turtle frog is a strange animal from western australia. Named after their turtle-like body, the species feeds exclusively on termites.... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,158 views

Tit for tet: Tet3 regulates neuron activity through epigenetic changes

by Betty Zou in Eat, Read, Science

Tet3 regulates neuronal activity through epigenetic changes in the cells' DNA. It alters the speed and ease with which neurons communicate by altering the number of receptors at the synapse.... Read more »

Yu H, Su Y, Shin J, Zhong C, Guo JU, Weng YL, Gao F, Geschwind DH, Coppola G, Ming GL.... (2015) Tet3 regulates synaptic transmission and homeostatic plasticity via DNA oxidation and repair. Nature neuroscience, 18(6), 836-43. PMID: 25915473  

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