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  • March 13, 2017
  • 03:29 AM
  • 159 views

Mitochondria support for mitochondrial activity in [some] autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"This study examined the effect of common mitochondrial treatments on specific mitochondrial components in a group of children diagnosed with ASD [autism spectrum disorder], some of which also were diagnosed with co-morbid mitochondrial disease."That was the premise of the study results published by Leanna Delhey and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) and follows previous discussions suggesting that mitochondrial disease might not be totally unfamiliar to at least some autism ........ Read more »

Delhey LM, Nur Kilinc E, Yin L, Slattery JC, Tippett ML, Rose S, Bennuri SC, Kahler SG, Damle S, Legido A.... (2017) The Effect of Mitochondrial Supplements on Mitochondrial Activity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of clinical medicine, 6(2). PMID: 28208802  

  • March 11, 2017
  • 04:45 PM
  • 147 views

Badass females are unpopular among praying mantids

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll One of the most iconic representations of praying mantids is that of a female eating the male after (or during) sex, an unpleasant scenario that starts with a beheading before the poor male even finishes his … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • March 11, 2017
  • 04:19 AM
  • 177 views

B vitamins for schizophrenia?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'd like to briefly draw your attention to the results - systematic review and meta-analysis results - published by Joseph Firth and colleagues [1] observing that "certain vitamin and mineral supplements may reduce psychiatric symptoms in some people with schizophrenia" and specifically that certain B vitamins might be something to consider.Such results come from a research team who are making significant waves in the field of meta-analyses and systematic reviews for all manner of different [imp........ Read more »

  • March 10, 2017
  • 06:05 AM
  • 145 views

Spontaneous Pneumothorax and air travel in BHD Syndrome

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Previous studies show that BHD syndrome causes spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) in 24-38% of patients, with a recurrence rate of up to 75% (Toro et al., 2007; Toro et al., 2008; Houweling et al., 2011). A common preventative strategy used following an initial SP in patients with BHD is pleurodesis, however, its efficacy in preventing recurrent episodes is not well known. Due to the pressure changes during air travel, cystic air spaces expand and compress in the thorax possibly leading to cyst ruptu........ Read more »

Gupta N, Kopras EJ, Henske EP, James LE, El-Chemaly S, Veeraraghavan S, Drake MG, & McCormack FX. (2017) Spontaneous Pneumothoraces in Patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome. Annals of the American Thoracic Society. PMID: 28248571  

  • March 10, 2017
  • 02:37 AM
  • 156 views

I would walk 500 miles... or maybe just 8 miles (a day).

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Desk-bound workers should ‘walk EIGHT miles a day’ to slash risk of heart attacks or stroke" went one headline talking about the findings reported by William Tigbe and colleagues [1]. Drawing on data from over 110 postal workers - "(55 office-workers, 5 women, and 56 walking/delivery-workers, 10 women)" - who wore "activPAL physical activity monitors for seven days", researchers observed some potentially important trends.Alongside wearing their activity monitors, participants were also asse........ Read more »

  • March 9, 2017
  • 07:18 AM
  • 146 views

Getting High Off Snakebites?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

In a curious case report, Indian psychiatrists Lekhansh Shukla and colleagues describe a young man who said he regularly got high by being bitten by a snake.



The 21-year old patient sought treatment for his heavy drug abuse, which included heroin and marijuna. He also reported a less conventional habit: he visited a local snake charmer, where he was bitten on the lips by a "cobra" in order to get high:
He reported that his peers and the snake charmer informed him that he would have drows... Read more »

Shukla L, Reddy SS, Kandasamy A, & Benegal V. (2017) What kills everyone, gives a high for some-Recreational Snake Envenomation. Asian journal of psychiatry, 106-108. PMID: 28262128  

  • March 9, 2017
  • 03:58 AM
  • 156 views

This Is How Vision, Not Limbs, May Have Driven Fish onto Land

by beredim in Strange Animals






In a recent study, researchers provide a new theory for the reason we walk the Earth




A new provocative study suggests it was the power of the eyes and not the limbs that first led our ancient aquatic ancestors to make the momentous leap from water to land. According to it, crocodile-like animals first saw easy meals on land and consequently evolved limbs that enabled them to get there, ... Read more »

MacIver MA, Schmitz L, Mugan U, Murphey TD, & Mobley CD. (2017) Massive increase in visual range preceded the origin of terrestrial vertebrates. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 28270619  

  • March 9, 2017
  • 03:06 AM
  • 172 views

"Relatives of individuals with ASD were at higher risk of ADHD"

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Individuals with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] and their relatives are at increased risk of ADHD [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder]."So said the paper published by Laura Ghirardi and colleagues [1] (open-access) who studied "1 899 654 individuals born in Sweden between 1987 and 2006" and identified some 28,000 cases of ASD and 82,000 cases of ADHD "with 13 793 individuals... being comorbid cases."Results: "Individuals with ASD were at higher risk of having ADHD, co........ Read more »

Ghirardi L, Brikell I, Kuja-Halkola R, Freitag CM, Franke B, Asherson P, Lichtenstein P, & Larsson H. (2017) The familial co-aggregation of ASD and ADHD: a register-based cohort study. Molecular psychiatry. PMID: 28242872  

  • March 8, 2017
  • 08:30 AM
  • 153 views

Epigenetic Predisposition to Radiation Fibrosis

by Christoph Weigel in EpiBeat

Radiotherapy is a highly efficient treatment for many cancers including breast cancer. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT), a relatively new type of radiation therapy, has proven successful as a curative treatment for early cancer stages. However, in spite of great improvements in dose delivery and imaging technology, unwanted exposure of healthy tissue to radiation cannot be fully avoided. The resulting late-onset toxicity due to the exposure of health tissue currently limits the usefulness of r........ Read more »

Weigel C, Veldwijk MR, Oakes CC, Seibold P, Slynko A, Liesenfeld DB, Rabionet M, Hanke SA, Wenz F, Sperk E.... (2016) Epigenetic regulation of diacylglycerol kinase alpha promotes radiation-induced fibrosis. Nature communications, 10893. PMID: 26964756  

  • March 8, 2017
  • 03:09 AM
  • 144 views

Blocking FRAAs and thyroid function in autism (continued)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Readers of this post are advised to check out a previous blogging occasion describing how 'FRAAs - folate receptor alpha autoantibodies - may correlate with reduced thyroid function in cases of autism' before heading into this entry on the recent paper published by Richard Frye and colleagues [1].You're back already? OK, well just in case you didn't read that last entry (😉), it's worthwhile first noting that: "Folate receptor α (FRα) autoantibodies (FRAAs) are prevalent in autism spectrum d........ Read more »

  • March 8, 2017
  • 02:16 AM
  • 148 views

See the First Underwater Video of the Ultra-Rare True's Beaked Whale

by beredim in Strange Animals






The group feautred in this videp was formed by three adult or sub-adult whales. Social behavior of the True's Beaked Whale is still unknown but the group seemed to dive in a coordinated manner, as has been observed in other species of beaked whales. Credit: Roland Edler





True's beaked whales (Mesoplodon mirus) are such an elusive species that it's only now that we finally have the ... Read more »

Aguilar de Soto, N., Martín, V., Silva, M., Edler, R., Reyes, C., Carrillo, M., Schiavi, A., Morales, T., García-Ovide, B., Sanchez-Mora, A.... (2017) True’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon mirus) in Macaronesia. PeerJ. DOI: 10.7717/peerj.3059  

  • March 7, 2017
  • 04:23 AM
  • 172 views

Herbal medicines 'for' ADHD systematically reviewed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Dennis Anheyer and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) is offered up for your reading consumption today, and the results of a review of the available published science - "Only randomized controlled trails (RCT)" (authors' spelling mistake not mine) - looking at the use of herbal medicines for the treatment/management of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).OK I know some people read the term 'herbal medicine' and automatically think 'woo'. If I instead use th........ Read more »

  • March 6, 2017
  • 06:32 AM
  • 174 views

The growing divide between higher and low impact scientific journals

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Ten years ago the Public Library of Science started one big lower impact and a series of smaller higher impact journals. Over the years these publication outlets diverged. The growing divide between standard and top journals might mirror wider trends in scholarly publishing. There are roughly two kinds of journals in the Public Library of […]... Read more »

Vale, R.D. (2015) Accelerating scientific publication in biology. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 13439-13446. DOI: 10.1101/022368  

  • March 6, 2017
  • 04:39 AM
  • 136 views

Bumblebees Learn To Score Goals For Food !

by beredim in Strange Animals

New study by researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) shows how bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) can be trained to score goals with a mini-ball, revealing unprecedented learning abilities:



Researchers train bumblebees to move a ball in order to access a sugar solution as a reward.


The study, published in the journal Science, suggests that species whose lifestyle demands advanced ... Read more »

  • March 6, 2017
  • 04:25 AM
  • 173 views

"Logical fallacies in animal model research"

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A paper which is a bit 'out of left field' is presented for your reading pleasure today and how one should be rather careful about how animal research - "with focus on animal models of mental illness" - is translated into relevance to humans [1].The paper by Espen Sjoberg is pertinent to various diagnostic labels including depression and schizophrenia. I would perhaps disagree with the author including autism under the specific heading of 'mental illness' (bearing in mind various mental hea........ Read more »

Sjoberg EA. (2017) Logical fallacies in animal model research. Behavioral and Brain Functions. info:/10.1186/s12993-017-0121-8

  • March 4, 2017
  • 04:43 AM
  • 160 views

Fatigue in adults with a 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The genetic condition called 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) has, on occasion, provided some research fodder for this blog (see here and see here). The reason for its inclusion here has tended to be around the 'overlap' in the presentation of 22q11.2 and autism/autistic features and the importance of appropriate screening as and when an autism diagnosis is received (see here). Remember: receipt of an autism diagnosis is a starting point not the finishing line.Today I'm once again talk........ Read more »

Vergaelen E, Claes S, Kempke S, & Swillen A. (2017) High prevalence of fatigue in adults with a 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. American journal of medical genetics. Part A. PMID: 28190295  

  • March 3, 2017
  • 11:05 PM
  • 122 views

All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations

by ragothamanyennamalli in Getting to know Structural Bioinformatics

With increasing computational power (aka GPU) that can be accessed these days, it is no wonder that performing all-atom molecular dynamics simulation for a longer time, with duplicates and/or triplicates, has become easier.... Read more »

  • March 3, 2017
  • 03:48 PM
  • 166 views

Brain Activity At The Moment of Death

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

What happens in the brain when we die?



Canadian researchers Loretta Norton and colleagues of the University of Western Ontario examine this grave question in a new paper: Electroencephalographic Recordings During Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Therapy Until 30 Minutes After Declaration of Death

Norton et al. examined frontal EEG recordings from four critically ill patients at the point where their life support was withdrawn. Here are some details on the four:



Here's the EEG recor... Read more »

Norton L, Gibson RM, Gofton T, Benson C, Dhanani S, Shemie SD, Hornby L, Ward R, & Young GB. (2017) Electroencephalographic Recordings During Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Therapy Until 30 Minutes After Declaration of Death. The Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences, 44(2), 139-145. PMID: 28231862  

  • March 3, 2017
  • 05:14 AM
  • 113 views

Rare Disease Day – Findacure Scientific Conference: Drug Repurposing for Rare Diseases

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

This year’s Findacure Scientific Conference took place in London on Rare Disease Day and was again focused on Drug Repurposing for Rare Diseases. The conference brought together over 100 representatives from patient groups, researchers and members of the healthcare industry to discuss the importance and the latest developments in drug repurposing for rare diseases.... Read more »

  • March 3, 2017
  • 02:56 AM
  • 162 views

Poverty status and autism, ADHD and asthma

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Christian Pulcini and colleagues [1] talking about poverty status potentially influencing "parent-reported lifetime prevalence and comorbidities" when it comes to three target conditions (autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD] and asthma) should have been a call to action. Concluding that "poor and near poor children had a higher lifetime prevalence of asthma and ADHD, but not ASD [autism spectrum disorder]" [2], some of the findings have instead attracted crit........ Read more »

Pulcini CD, Zima BT, Kelleher KJ, & Houtrow AJ. (2017) Poverty and Trends in Three Common Chronic Disorders. Pediatrics. PMID: 28193790  

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