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  • May 13, 2015
  • 07:03 AM
  • 44 views

Study Tests Two Dose Schedule of HPV Vaccination Against Genital Warts In Girls

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Maria Blomberg Virus, Lifestyle & Genes Danish Cancer Society Research Centre Copenhagen, Denmark Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Two vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) were licensed almost … Continue reading →
The post Study Tests Two Dose Schedule of HPV Vaccination Against Genital Warts In Girls appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Maria Blomberg. (2015) Study Tests Two Dose Schedule of HPV Vaccination Against Genital Warts In Girls. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 13, 2015
  • 05:44 AM
  • 42 views

Frequent ER Visits Linked To Prescription Drug Overdose

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Joanne Brady, PhD candidate Department of Anesthesiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health Columbia University, New York, NY Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the … Continue reading →
The post Frequent ER Visits Linked To Prescription Drug Overdose appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Joanne Brady, PhD candidate. (2015) Frequent ER Visits Linked To Prescription Drug Overdose. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 13, 2015
  • 05:01 AM
  • 95 views

Childhood inattention and later academic outcome

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Across the full range of scores at a population level, each 1-point increase in inattention at age 7 years is associated with worse academic outcomes at age 16."That was one of the conclusions reached in the study by Kapil Sayal and colleagues [1] (open-access) drawing on data derived from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children or ALSPAC to those in the know. This initiative has also recently produced some other intriguing results on the potential long-term effects of bullying for example (see here)."Matching of the ALSPAC database with the administrative National Pupil Database (NPD, the central repository in England for pupil-level educational data) provided details of the children's results in the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) examinations at age 16 years." For those resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, GCSEs are probably a familiar concept (they were the starting point for my own academic achievement record). For everyone else, GCSEs are normally sat at the end of the school journey (16 years) and form the start of the typical educational achievement hierarchy leading into A-levels, university degree and beyond. "In total, GCSE attainment data were available for 11,640 children (83% of the core ALSPAC sample)."The Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) was completed by parents and teachers of participating children when aged 7 years old. Similar to other discussions on this blog mentioning the DAWBA (see here) it relates "closely to DSM-IV items and focus on current problems and associated impairment." For the purposes of the Sayal study "the key variables of interest relate to inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity, and oppositional/defiant behaviors." Various other potential confounders such as child cognitive abilities and parental social class were also measured and taken into account when it came to the final analyses.Following some number-crunching the authors concluded that their results potentially "highlights the adverse effects of early childhood behavioral difficulties on educational outcomes in adolescence" specifically based on inattention symptoms: "inattention, particularly if noticeable to a parent or teacher, is a stronger predictor than hyperactivity/impulsivity of later academic difficulties." Disruptive behaviour disorder (DBD) and oppositional/defiant symptoms were also independently linked to worse academic outcomes in boys.I know that such findings are probably not totally unexpected in terms of issues such as inattention potentially impacting on learning ability/capacity/enthusiasm subsequently also being reflected in exam results, but the results do put a peer-reviewed, evidence-based perspective on things. Authors also note that: "teachers and parents should be aware of the academic impact of early behavioral difficulties, and, in particular, the risk associated with subthreshold difficulties." I might add that such results do not rule out other factors as playing a role in academic outcome as per other recent data [2].Insofar as what can be potentially done to mitigate such symptoms and their potential impact on academic performance, the authors offer a few suggestions including: "strategies that might help to optimize examination performance during teenage years include time management and organization skills (throughout the course of study), prioritization of key work, minimizing distractions, examination revision, and within-examination strategy." All well and good (and discussed by other authors [3]) I say but perhaps one might also look to 'tackling' issues such as inattention in other ways too. Take for example the recent paper from Bos and colleagues [4] (see this post) discussing their results based on supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids specifically on inattention symptoms. Probably not suitable or useful for every child with attentional issues, but certainly worth quite a bit more investigation looking for potential best responders based on the idea that good nutrition might be an important part of good mental health. Oh, and how about looking at sleep and even chess? [5]Music: Cannonball - The Breeders.----------[1] Sayal K. et al. Childhood behavior problems and academic outcomes in adolescence: longitudinal population-based study. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2015 May;54(5):360-368.e2.[2] Peyrot WJ. et al. The association between lower educational attainment and depression owing to shared genetic effects? Results in ~25 000 subjects. Molecular Psychiatry. 2015. April 28.[3] Ciesielski HA. et al. Academic Skills Groups for Middle School Children With ADHD in the Outpatient Mental Health Setting: An Open Trial. J Atten Disord. 2015 Apr 29. pii: 1087054715584055.[4] Bos DJ. et al. Reduced Symptoms of Inattention after Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation in Boys with and without Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2015 Mar 19.[5] Blasco-Fontecilla H. et al. Efficacy of chess training for the treatment of ADHD: A prospective, open label study. Rev Psiquiatr Salud Ment. 2015 Apr 21. pii: S1888-9891(15)00048-8.----------Sayal K, Washbrook E, & Propper C (2015). Childhood behavior problems and academic outcomes in adolescence: longitudinal population-based study. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 54 (5), 360-36800 PMID: 25901772... Read more »

Sayal K, Washbrook E, & Propper C. (2015) Childhood behavior problems and academic outcomes in adolescence: longitudinal population-based study. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 54(5), 360-36800. PMID: 25901772  

  • May 13, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 78 views

To the MOON (and Back) with ACL Rehabilitation

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Rehabilitation programs that incorporate early motion, limit open kinetic chain exercises prior to 6 weeks post surgery with a transition to normal open kinetic chain exercises, and incorporate neuromuscular training throughout are best practices during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction rehabilitation.... Read more »

Wright, R., Haas, A., Anderson, J., Calabrese, G., Cavanaugh, J., Hewett, T., Lorring, D., McKenzie, C., Preston, E., Williams, G.... (2014) Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Rehabilitation: MOON Guidelines. Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach, 7(3), 239-243. DOI: 10.1177/1941738113517855  

  • May 12, 2015
  • 09:55 PM
  • 99 views

It Really Is Harder For Some People to Lose Weight

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Martin Reinhardt, MD Postdoctoral Fellow PECRB, NIDDK, NIH Phoenix, AZ 85016 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Reinhardt:  It can be very difficult for some people with obesity … Continue reading →
The post It Really Is Harder For Some People to Lose Weight appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Martin Reinhardt, MD. (2015) It Really Is Harder For Some People to Lose Weight. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 12, 2015
  • 09:26 PM
  • 85 views

HPV Vaccination of Boys Can Yield Substantial Health Benefits

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Johannes Berkhof Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Centre Amsterdam Centre for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands Medical Research: What is the background for this study? … Continue reading →
The post HPV Vaccination of Boys Can Yield Substantial Health Benefits appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Johannes Berkhof. (2015) HPV Vaccination Of Boys Can Yield Substantial Health Benefits. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 12, 2015
  • 09:08 PM
  • 88 views

Dietary Restriction Provides Benefits Beyond Weight Loss

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Edward “Ted” Weiss, Ph.D. Associate Professor Department of Nutrition and Dietetics Saint Louis University Saint Louis MO Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Weiss:  Results from one of … Continue reading →
The post Dietary Restriction Provides Benefits Beyond Weight Loss appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Edward "Ted" Weiss, Ph.D. (2015) Dietary Restriction Provides Benefits Beyond Weight Loss. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 12, 2015
  • 06:53 PM
  • 78 views

Rising Number Of Heart Infections Due To Staphylococcus Bacteria

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: J L Mehta, MD, PhD Professor of Medicine and Physiology and Biophysics Stebbins Chair in Cardiology University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Little Rock, AR 72205 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are … Continue reading →
The post Rising Number Of Heart Infections Due To Staphylococcus Bacteria appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: J L Mehta, MD, PhD. (2015) Rising Number Of Heart Infections Due To Staphylococcus Bacteria. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 12, 2015
  • 06:42 PM
  • 88 views

To Stay Healthy: “Keep your waist to less than half your height”

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr Margaret Ashwell OBE, FAfN, RNutr (Public Health) Ashwell Associates Ashwell, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom. Visiting Research Fellow, Oxford Brookes University MedicalResearch: What are the main findings from this study? Dr. Ashwell: In this study, the authors explore … Continue reading →
The post To Stay Healthy: “Keep your waist to less than half your height” appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr Margaret Ashwell OBE, FAfN, RNutr (Public Health). (2015) To Stay Healthy: "Keep your waist to less than half your height". MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 12, 2015
  • 01:07 PM
  • 91 views

Rabbit roulette: Atropinesterase and the ability to handle deadly nightshade

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

All mammals possess an armament of enzymes capable of breaking apart various groups of molecules. These enzymes are typically named after their target. Peptidases act on peptides, lactase hones in on lactose, and so on. The enzyme-driven breakdown of molecules serves a wide variety of functions, including acquisition of nutrients from food and broken down cell parts, regulation of communication processes between and within cells, and detoxification of potentially harmful plant-derived substances.Esterases are good at taking apart esters. They accomplish this by using a water molecule to split the carbon-oxygen bond that lies at the core of an ester, resulting in the production of an acid and an alcohol. An important ester in the human body is acetylcholine, which functions as a neurotransmitter and thus enables communication throughout the nervous system. To turn off the signal created by the presence of acetylcholine, we produce an enzyme called acetylcholinesterase, which cleaves off an acetyl group (essentially acetate, an acid), leaving behind inactive choline (an alcohol). We can then re-attach the two to produce more acetylcholine elsewhere or at a later point in time.Deadly nightshade, potential bunny food (Source)Unlike other mammals, rabbits have been observed to be capable of munching on the leaves of a plant called deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna) without becoming dead. The plant contains a number of tropane alkaloids (tropane = a ring of seven carbon atoms fused to a second ring formed by a nitrogen atom) including atropine and scopolamine. These alkaloids, which we use as drugs in low doses, can cause a variety of nasty and deadly effects. They also happen to be esters.Further investigation of nightshade-resistant bunnies revealed the presence of relatively high concentrations of atropinesterase in their blood. This enzyme is capable of breaking apart nightshade-derived tropane alkaloid esters, resulting in their detoxification. It has been estimated that atropinesterase-producing rabbits have enough of the enzyme coursing through their veins to inactivate doses of atropine sufficient to cause effects in substantially larger human beings.Interestingly, appreciable production of this enzyme is only found in rabbits (vs. people, pigs, goats, and dogs), and even then, only in some of them and seemingly at random. For example, two different studies reported that 59% and 33% of New Zealand Whites made the enzyme, so within a single strain the proportion of rabbits that can handle deadly nightshade can vary widely. Very generally though, it appears that rabbits that have a fair amount of black fur tend to make lots of atropinesterase, likely reflecting a linkage between the genes encoding these traits.Atropinesterase can pose a bit of a problem for researchers using rabbits as an animal model to investigate the effects of certain drugs. In cases where rabbits are being given atropine or scopolamine (which are used to block certain actions of acetylcholine, and so are fairly widely used), results can obviously be skewed by whether or not they quickly rid themselves of these drugs. In particular, studies looking to investigate potential treatments for organophosphate poisoning can potentially be disrupted, since these poisons inhibit acetylcholinesterase and atropine is typically used to control the toxic effects of the resulting build up of acetylcholine.Incidentally, rabbits also produce an enzyme called cocainesterase, for which the scientific literature is rather scarce. Cocaine is also a tropane alkaloid. Perhaps South American bunnies eat coca plants?ReferencesCauthen SE, Ellis RD, Larrison SB, Kidd MR. 1976. Resolution, purification and characterization of rabbit serum atropinesterase and cocainesterase. Biochemical Pharmacology 25(2):181-185.Harrison PK, Tattersall JE, Gosden E. 2006. The presence of atropinesterase activity in animal plasma. Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology 373(3):230-236.Liebenberg SP, Linn JM. 1980. Seasonal and sexual influences on rabbit atropinesterase. Laboratory Animals 14(4):297-300. [Full text]... Read more »

Harrison, P., Tattersall, J., & Gosden, E. (2006) The presence of atropinesterase activity in animal plasma. Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology, 373(3), 230-236. DOI: 10.1007/s00210-006-0054-5  

  • May 12, 2015
  • 07:36 AM
  • 71 views

Negative Ultrasound Study Can Rule Out Upper Extremity DVT

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dott. Michelangelo Sartori U.O. di Angiologia e Malattie della Coagulazione Azienda Ospedaliera di Bologna Policlinico Sant’Orsola Malpighi Bologna Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: The safety of withholding … Continue reading →
The post Negative Ultrasound Study Can Rule Out Upper Extremity DVT appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dott. Michelangelo Sartori. (2015) Negative Ultrasound Study Can Rule Out Upper Extremity DVT. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 12, 2015
  • 07:26 AM
  • 62 views

Emergence and Persistence of Obesity in Mid-childhood Is Found To Be High

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Matthew Pearce NHS Gloucestershire Clinical Commissioning Group UK Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Despite evidence to suggest that the prevalence of childhood obesity in the UK has … Continue reading →
The post Emergence and Persistence of Obesity in Mid-childhood Is Found To Be High appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Matthew Pearce. (2015) Many Overweight and Obese Children Will Become Obese Adults. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 12, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 73 views

Dexamethasone May Limit Kidney Failure After Heart Surgery

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Kirolos A. Jacob, MD, MSc PhD Candidate Division Vital Functions, Cardiothoracic Surgery and Intensive Care Medicine University Medical Center Utrecht Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Jacob: Heart … Continue reading →
The post Dexamethasone May Limit Kidney Failure After Heart Surgery appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Kirolos A. Jacob, MD, MSc PhD Candidate. (2015) Dexamethasone May Prevent Kidney Failure After Heart Surgery. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 12, 2015
  • 05:13 AM
  • 101 views

Consider congenital cytomegalovirus infection when it comes to autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"The finding lends some further support for congenital CMV [cytomegalovirus] being one of the many aetiologies underlying autism spectrum disorder with intellectual disability."That was the conclusion reached by Mona-Lisa Engman and colleagues [1] from Sweden following their study looking to "evaluate the prevalence of congenital cytomegalovirus infection (CMV) in a representative sample of children with autism spectrum disorder." Carrying some rather distinguished company as part of the authorship list (see here and see here for example), researchers analysed that most important (and under-rated in my opinion) of resources, the newborn dried blood spot (see here), to screen for "CMV DNA using TaqMan-polymerase chain reaction.""One of the 33 children with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability - 3% of that group - had congenital CMV infection." Allowing for the small group included for study and the isolated case of congenital CMV infection detected, the corresponding general population estimate for congenital CMV in Sweden (0.2%) was surpassed leading to the call for "similar studies with much larger samples."I've talked about congenital CMV infection and autism before on this blog (see here) and how some studies [2] have talked about infection rates quite a bit in excess of that seen in the general population when examining children diagnosed with autism. I've got little more to say on this topic aside from the idea that screening for congenital CMV should perhaps be expanded as and when autism is diagnosed. As per other research from Engman [3] congenital CMV might also carry some specific morphological changes to the brain which could also be included for further inspection, particularly in light of the findings from Erbetta and colleagues [4] covered in a recent post (see here).And then to mechanisms of effect...Music: Kate Bush and Army Dreamers. And if you're really interested (as I was), The Kate Bush Story: Running Up That Hill.----------[1] Engman ML. et al. Prenatal acquired cytomegalovirus infection should be considered in children with autism. Acta Paediatr. 2015 Apr 21.[2] Sakamoto A. et al. Retrospective diagnosis of congenital cytomegalovirus infection in children with autism spectrum disorder but no other major neurologic deficit. Brain Dev. 2015 Feb;37(2):200-5.[3] Engman ML. et al. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: the impact of cerebral cortical malformations. Acta Paediatr. 2010 Sep;99(9):1344-9.[4] Erbetta A. et al. Low-Functioning Autism and Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Findings. J Child Neurol. 2015 Apr 20.----------Engman ML, Sundin M, Miniscalco C, Westerlund J, Lewensohn-Fuchs I, Gillberg C, & Fernell E (2015). Prenatal acquired cytomegalovirus infection should be considered in children with autism. Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992) PMID: 25900322... Read more »

Engman ML, Sundin M, Miniscalco C, Westerlund J, Lewensohn-Fuchs I, Gillberg C, & Fernell E. (2015) Prenatal acquired cytomegalovirus infection should be considered in children with autism. Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992). PMID: 25900322  

  • May 11, 2015
  • 04:08 PM
  • 94 views

Genetic Variants Explain Differences in Age Of Onset Of Huntington’s Disease Symptoms

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Kristina Bečanovič Ph.D. Department of Clinical Neuroscience Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Becanovic: While the symptoms normally debut in middle-age, there is wide individual variation in how Huntington … Continue reading →
The post Genetic Variants Explain Differences in Age Of Onset Of Huntington’s Disease Symptoms appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Kristina Bečanovič Ph.D. (2015) Genetic Variants Explain Differences in Age Of Onset Of Huntington's Disease Symptoms. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 11, 2015
  • 02:37 PM
  • 88 views

Nondisclosure Agreements in Medical Malpractice Settlements May Limit Transparency

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: William M. Sage MD JD James R. Dougherty Chair for Faculty Excellence School of Law The University of Texas Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: We reviewed settlement … Continue reading →
The post Nondisclosure Agreements in Medical Malpractice Settlements May Limit Transparency appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & William M. Sage MD JD. (2015) Nondisclosure Agreements in Medical Malpractice Settlements May Limit Transparency. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 11, 2015
  • 12:15 PM
  • 97 views

Moderate Wine Intake In Diabetes May Improve Glucose Metabolism

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School Professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Assoc Director, Channing Division of Network Medicine Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital Boston, … Continue reading →
The post Moderate Wine Intake In Diabetes May Improve Glucose Metabolism appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH. (2015) Moderate Wine Intake In Diabetes May Improve Glucose Metabolism. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 11, 2015
  • 10:43 AM
  • 83 views

Red Blood Cell Surface Molecule May Be Target For New Malaria Vaccine and Treatment

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Manoj Duraisingh Ph.D. John LaPorte Given Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases Boston, Massachusetts MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are … Continue reading →
The post Red Blood Cell Surface Molecule May Be Target For New Malaria Vaccine and Treatment appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Manoj Duraisingh Ph.D. (2015) Red Blood Cell Surface Molecule May Be Target For New Malaria Vaccine and Treatment. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 11, 2015
  • 10:03 AM
  • 84 views

Electronic Medical Records Did Not Improve Stroke Outcomes Or Quality Of Care

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Karen E. Joynt, MD MPH Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and VA Boston Healthcare System Department of Health Policy and Management Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study?  … Continue reading →
The post Electronic Medical Records Did Not Improve Stroke Outcomes Or Quality Of Care appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Karen E. Joynt, MD MPH. (2015) Electronic Medical Records Did Not Improve Stroke Outcomes Or Quality Of Care. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 11, 2015
  • 09:46 AM
  • 90 views

Breast Cancer Risk Reduction of Prophylactic Salpingo-Oophorectomy May Be Overestimated For Some BRCA1 Carriers

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Bernadette A.M. Heemskerk-Gerritsen, Ph.D. Department of Medical Oncology Erasmus MC Cancer Institute Roterdam, the Netherlands Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Heemskerk-Gerritsen: Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 … Continue reading →
The post Breast Cancer Risk Reduction of Prophylactic Salpingo-Oophorectomy May Be Overestimated For Some BRCA1 Carriers appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Bernadette A.M. Heemskerk-Gerritsen, Ph.D. (2015) Breast Cancer Risk Reduction of Prophylactic Salpingo-Oophorectomy May Be Overestimated For Some BRCA1 Carriers. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

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