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  • March 30, 2015
  • 08:26 PM
  • 38 views

Black HIV Patients Have Increased Mortality Even When Treated

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Catherine R. Lesko, MPH Department of Epidemiology UNC School of Global Public Health Chapel Hill, NC Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: There is a lot of evidence … Continue reading →
The post Black HIV+ Patients Have Increased Mortality Even When Treated appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Catherine R. Lesko, MPH. (2015) Black HIV Patients Have Increased Mortality Even When Treated. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 06:57 PM
  • 40 views

Kidney Stone Risk Affected By Age and Sex

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Majuran Perinpam, BsC Mayo Clinic Rochester, Minn MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? Response: The four key urinary factors: Calcium, magnesium, oxalate and uric acid are all implicated in kidney stone formation. Age and sex … Continue reading →
The post Kidney Stone Risk Affected By Age and Sex appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Majuran Perinpam, BsC. (2015) Kidney Stone Risk Affected By Age and Sex. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 05:42 PM
  • 80 views

Welcome to the wikipedia for neurons

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

While the brain might not have more connections than stars in the universe (sorry guys), it is still complex. In fact, someone I respect defined a neuroscientist as “someone who knows how little we know about the brain.” Despite the decades worth of data that has been collected about the billions of neurons in the brain, we still don’t know much. So to help scientists make sense of the vast amount of information we already collected, researchers used data mining to create neuroelectro.org, a publicly available website that acts like Wikipedia, indexing physiological information about neurons.... Read more »

  • March 30, 2015
  • 05:41 PM
  • 30 views

COPD Patients On Oxygen Therapy Should Be Warned Of Burn Risks

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Gulshan Sharma, MD, MPH Division of Pulmonary Critical Care and Sleep Medicine University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston, TX   Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Sharma: Thirty-five … Continue reading →
The post COPD Patients On Oxygen Therapy Should Be Warned Of Burn Risks appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Gulshan Sharma, MD, MPH. (2015) COPD Patients On Oxygen Therapy Should Be Warned Of Burn Risks. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 04:32 PM
  • 30 views

Despite Claims, Xylitol May Not Help Prevent Tooth Decay

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Philip Riley Cochrane Oral Health Group, School of Dentistry The University of Manchester Manchester, UK Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: As tooth decay is still so prevalent … Continue reading →
The post Despite Claims, Xylitol May Not Help Prevent Tooth Decay appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Philip Riley. (2015) Despite Claims, Xylitol May Not Help Prevent Tooth Decay. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 02:45 PM
  • 62 views

Heart Attack Carries Worse Prognosis In Dialysis Patients

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Tanush Gupta, MD Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology New York Medical College, NY Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Gupta: There are approximately 600,000 prevalent cases of … Continue reading →
The post Heart Attack Carries Worse Prognosis In Dialysis Patients appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Tanush Gupta, MD. (2015) Heart Attack Carries Worse Prognosis In Dialysis Patients. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 01:38 PM
  • 49 views

Diagnosing TB in Children: Evaluating Xpert Assay

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr Anne K Detjen, MD Child Lung Health Consultant International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Detjen: The bacteriological diagnosis of tuberculosis … Continue reading →
The post Diagnosing TB in Children: Evaluating Xpert Assay appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr Anne K Detjen, MD. (2015) Diagnosing TB in Children: Evaluating Xpert Assay. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 12:19 PM
  • 51 views

Cardiorespiratory Fitness May Decrease Cancer Risk and Improve Survival

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Susan G. Lakoski, M.D. Assistant Professor of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology DivisionDepartment of Medicine Director, Cardiovascular Prevention Program for Cancer PatientsVermont Cancer Center, Division of Hematology/OncologyUniversity of Vermont, BurlingtonCo-Investigators from Cooper Center Longitudinal Study Cooper Institute in Dallas, Texas … Continue reading →
The post Cardiorespiratory Fitness May Decrease Cancer Risk and Improve Survival appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Susan G. Lakoski, M.D. (2015) Cardiorespiratory Fitness May Decrease Cancer Risk and Improve Survival. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 11:32 AM
  • 112 views

Gut Feelings

by Miss Behavior in The Scorpion and the Frog

This boy may be influencing who he will marry when he grows up. Photo by Orrling at Wikimedia Commons.Animals (including humans) are swarming with microorganisms both on and in our bodies. Humans harbor so many different microorganisms that we have over 150 times more microbial genes than mammalian genes, and it is reasonable to suspect that this scenario is similar for most animals. But before you run to soak in a tub of hand sanitizer, you should realize that many of these microorganisms are actually beneficial to the health of both your body and your mind. Although this field is still very much in its infancy, we have found that the microbes that live in digestive tracts in particular significantly influence their host animal’s behaviors. This connection between our digestive communities and our behaviors has been termed the microbiota–gut–brain axis. Much of the early research on the microbiota-gut-brain axis was done using specialized mice that have never been exposed to any bacteria. You may think this sounds like a healthy lifestyle, but these so-called germ-free mice have all kinds of health and behavioral problems. They often have digestive difficulties and high levels of anxiety, symptoms common of people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). They also typically have deficits in social behavior and increased repetitive behaviors. Similar to autism-spectrum disorders and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), these behavioral problems are more likely to occur in males than in females. When faced with a challenge, many struggle with solving the problem and show a higher tendency to give up, symptoms common in patients with depression. Interestingly, simply feeding germ-free mice some species of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli bacteria (similar to bacterial strains found in different brands of yogurt) can reduce symptoms of anxiety, depression, cognitive difficulties, autism, and OCD. This has led to a boom in biomedical research on the benefits of probiotics (that contain microbes that live in our guts) and prebiotics (that contain things that the microbes in our guts eat).Yogurt bacteria. Photo by Josef Reischig at Wikimedia Commons.These gut microbes don’t just help animals maintain their physical and mental health, they are also involved in complex social behaviors. For example, fruit flies prefer mates that grew up eating the same diet that they grew up eating. However, if they are treated with antibiotics, which kill the gut bacteria, they lose their mate choice preferences. If they are then treated again with microbes from their initial diet (with one Lactobacillus bacteria in particular), they gain their mate choice preferences back. This all makes me wonder, how important is yogurt to choosing the people we date and marry? How do microbes in our guts affect our brains anyway? Although the answer to this is still mostly unknown, we know that the gut has the potential to influence the brain through multiple means, including hormone production, immune function, and even directly through specific nerves. The specific mechanisms are still being very actively researched, but it is clear that microscopic critters living in our guts likely influence our brains and behaviors in many different physiological ways. Microbiota-gut-brain axis research is revolutionizing the way we think about health, medical treatments, behavior and even existential questions like who am I? But one thing is for sure: I’m gonna go have another yogurt. Want to know more? Check these out: Cryan, J., & Dinan, T. (2015). More than a Gut Feeling: the Microbiota Regulates Neurodevelopment and Behavior Neuropsychopharmacology, 40 (1), 241-242 DOI: 10.1038/npp.2014.224 Ezenwa, V., Gerardo, N., Inouye, D., Medina, M., & Xavier, J. (2012). Animal Behavior and the Microbiome Science, 338 (6104), 198-199 DOI: 10.1126/science.1227412 ... Read more »

Ezenwa, V., Gerardo, N., Inouye, D., Medina, M., & Xavier, J. (2012) Animal Behavior and the Microbiome. Science, 338(6104), 198-199. DOI: 10.1126/science.1227412  

  • March 30, 2015
  • 11:25 AM
  • 85 views

One Parent,Two Parents and Child Well-Being

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

The structure of the family in the United States and other countries is changing. This change has occurred over a relatively brief period of time. Data noted in the study I am reviewing today shows that between 1970 and 2013 in the U.S.:Percentage of children living with two parents dropped 24%Percentage of children living with a single mother increased to 23.7%Percentage of children living with a single father quadrupled to 4.1%Percentage of children living with a grandparent doubled to 6.2%It is important to understand how these changes in the structure of family effects children across a variety of domains.This topic is the focus of an important manuscript published in Population Health Metrics. Patrick Krueger along with four colleagues summarized data related to parental structure and child well-being using the National Health Interview Survey.They grouped parental structure into nine parental groups. Using married couples (comprising 67% of the sample) as a reference parental unit other structural units in the study included: cohabiting non-married couples, single mother, single father, extended married couple, extended cohabiting couple, extended single mother, extended single mother and skipped generation (care by grandparent). Extended modifiers were added to parental structure when at least one grandparent was available and provided direct care activity to the child.Children with the various parental structures were compared across multiple variables. The findings that stood out to me included the following:Children of married couples generally show higher markers of well-being. However, this effect is reduced but not eliminated when controlling for socioeconomic statusChildren living with a single father fared better than children living with a single mother--fewer ER visits, fewer missed school days, better global health statusThe presence of an extended grandparent did not appear to significantly buffer the effect of single parent on health well-being and other well-being measuresLearning disabilities and child ADHD rates were highest in children of single mothers and children being raised by grandparentsChildren of single mothers were more likely to be reported as having several medical problems including headaches, ear infections, asthma and anemia The findings from this study are important. The most important implication from my perspective is the need to identify at-risk children across all family structure groups. Targeting assessment and intervention assistance in children of single mother and grandparents may produce the highest improvement in well-being and outcome.The additional services required to address changes in parental structure are evident. Improving access to child medical and mental health care seems to be a key first step. Providing additional financial assistance, assistance with transportation and regular day care support is needed. Expanding early childhood education programs and integrating medical and mental health services with school services may also benefit those most at risk.There is a load of data in this important paper that readers may want to review in more detail. The free full-text manuscript can be accessed by clicking on the PMID link in the citation below.Photo of brown pelican is from the author's files.Follow the author on Twitter WRY999Krueger PM, Jutte DP, Franzini L, Elo I, & Hayward MD (2015). Family structure and multiple domains of child well-being in the United States: a cross-sectional study. Population health metrics, 13 PMID: 25729332... Read more »

  • March 30, 2015
  • 03:20 AM
  • 102 views

Asthma and ADHD (again)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Asthmatic children had a higher risk of also having ADHD."That was the conclusion reached by Kirsten Holmberg and colleagues [1] based on their analysis of rates of ADHD, and other variables found "through the Swedish Twin Register, linked to the Swedish Medical Birth Register, the National Patient Register and the Prescribed Drug Register." Said data came from over 20,000 twins who's parents were questioned when children were aged 9 or 12 years.For those unfamiliar with the proposed connection [2] between the respiratory condition(s) headed under the label of asthma and the presentation of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), this is not the first time that peer-reviewed research has hinted at some kind of relationship. The 'big data' studies coming out of Taiwan for example, have similarly reported an association (see here). That part of any relationship between asthma and ADHD might also be mediated by the comorbid appearance of autism (see here) has also been proposed, although the the idea that autism (singularly) and asthma might overlap has been recently questioned (see here).Holmberg et al also reported that: "The association [between asthma and ADHD] was not restricted to either of the two dimensions of ADHD" following their analysis of the 'inattentive' and 'hyperactive/impulsive' domains that made up ADHD. They did find that asthma severity might however mediate the association with ADHD as per their reporting on an increased odds ratio (OR) "for >4 asthma attacks in the last 12 months."What's more to say about this possible connection? Well, preferential screening for ADHD when a diagnosis of asthma is received might be something for healthcare professionals to consider first and foremost. Acknowledging also that there may be several facets to ADHD including those related to sleep for example (see here) one might also entertain some further clinical investigations here also in light of what asthma can also do to sleeping patterns and routines [3]."Asthma medication seems not to increase the risk of ADHD" was another conclusion from Holmberg et al so to some degree allaying any fears that pharmacotherapy for asthma is 'causative' of ADHD. That being said, the idea that certain medicines might be 'linked' to both asthma and/or ADHD [4] is still deserving of further research consideration as has been previously mentioned on this blog (see here and see here). I might also put forward the idea that when it comes to overlapping variables potentially spanning asthma and ADHD, one might have a look at issues such as vitamin D availability (see here and see here) or even food (see here and see here) as potentially showing some shared involvement for some.For whatever reason, the evidence linking asthma and ADHD is growing...Music: Some Might Say from Oasis.----------[1] Holmberg K. et al. Impact of asthma medication and familial factors on the association between childhood asthma and ADHD A combined twin- and register-based study. Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 Mar 13.[2] Chou CJ. et al. Asthma in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a nationwide population-based study. Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2014 Nov;26(4):254-60.[3] Teodorescu M. et al. Association between asthma and risk of developing obstructive sleep apnea. JAMA. 2015 Jan 13;313(2):156-64.[4] Tiegs G. et al. New problems arising from old drugs: second-generation effects of acetaminophen. Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol. 2014 Sep;7(5):655-62.----------Holmberg K, Lundholm C, Anckarsäter H, Larsson H, & Almqvist C (2015). Impact of asthma medication and familial factors on the association between childhood asthma and ADHD A combined twin- and register-based study. Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology PMID: 25772649... Read more »

  • March 30, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 66 views

On-field Management and Return-to-Play in Concussed Children are Lacking

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Only 58% of concussed children were managed according to recommended guidelines and 13% returned to play while symptomatic. Additionally, 93% of parents and 96% of players were unaware of their organization’s return-to-play guidelines following a concussion.... Read more »

  • March 29, 2015
  • 08:05 PM
  • 91 views

UK Researchers find parental perception of child’s weight is skewed

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Childhood obesity affects more than double the amount of children it did 30 years ago, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC). To figure out why the rate is increasing researchers studied the relationship between parents and their obese children to determine how to improve pediatric health. The study actually reveals how poorly parents rate their own child’s weight issues — at least until they reach extreme levels of obesity.... Read more »

Black et al. (2015) Child obesity cut-offs as derived from parental perceptions: cross-sectional questionnaire. British Journal of General Practice. info:/10.3399/bjgp15X684385

  • March 29, 2015
  • 05:45 PM
  • 76 views

A novel method makes gene therapy safer

by Valerie Ashton in The Molecular Scribe

An international team of researchers have validated a method for identifying human insulator genes that dampen the over-activity of therapeutic genes delivered during gene therapy.... Read more »

Liu M, Maurano MT, Wang H, Qi H, Song CZ, Navas PA, Emery DW, Stamatoyannopoulos JA, & Stamatoyannopoulos G. (2015) Genomic discovery of potent chromatin insulators for human gene therapy. Nature biotechnology, 33(2), 198-203. PMID: 25580597  

  • March 29, 2015
  • 04:39 AM
  • 110 views

Sera from children with autism inducing autistic features in rats?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"The autism sera injected rats demonstrated developmental delay and deficits in social communication, interaction, and novelty."That was one of the findings reported in the paper by Syed Faraz Kazim and colleagues [1] (open-access) who, among other things, injected intracerebroventricularly sera collected from children with autism into newborn rats and examined behavioural effects compared with injections of sera from asymptomatic controls. Actually, that was only one part of the research from Kazim et al but it does invite some further interesting questions...In brief, and bearing in mind the paper is open-access, a few details:A caveat first: "Based on studies described in this manuscript, the authors submitted a patent application to the United States Patent and Trademark Office on 12/11/2014, entitled: “Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders with Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Peptide Mimetic”; application number US62/083,570; Inventors: Khalid Iqbal and Inge Grundke-Iqbal." The authors report a potential competing interest and good on them for doing so.As noted, there were several aspects to this research focused to a large extent around neurotrophins including something called ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) or rather "a CNTF small peptide mimetic, P6" which might have the ability to increase levels of BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor ), a compound that has cropped up before on this blog (see here).So: sera from children with autism were initially added to "mouse primary cultured cortical neurons grown for 72 hours in medium" and resulted in "gross morphological changes". Pretreatment of said mouse neurons with P6 - "which corresponds to amino acid residues 146–156 of human CNTF" - seemed to have an effect that: "resulted in a significant reduction in cell death in cultured neurons treated with sera from autistic children." Another detail derived from this experiment: "Primary cortical neurons grown in the presence of autistic sera showed higher levels of oxidative stress." Interesting in light of other research in this area with autism in mind (see here)...Next: what was it in the sera from autistic children which seemed to be having effects on mouse neurons which weren't seen in control sera? Well it's possible that: "the presence of neurotrophic abnormalities in the sera from autistic children that could have contributed to altered development of neurons and increase in cell death and oxidative stress found." By neurotrophic abnormalities, the authors meant issues with "mature CNTF and BDNF" among other things.Next were the results from those studies where rat pups were injected with autism or control sera "with or without P6". More quotes: "alterations in the levels of neurotrophic factors in the sera from autistic individuals could contribute to neurobehavioral phenotype of autism in rats". By that the authors reported some potential differences in rat behaviour focused on things like grooming behaviour (repetitive behaviour) and ultrasonic calls (akin to social communication). P6 potentially rescuing functions was also reported for some of the tests.Conclusion: with the caveats of much more investigation required and that rats are rats and not humans (see here) "this study provides evidence regarding the neurotrophic abnormalities in autism and the potential role they play in the pathophysiology" of the condition. Further: "Ameliorating the neurotrophic imbalance during early stages of brain development can serve as a potential therapeutic approach for autism. P6 represents a new class of neurotrophic peptide mimetics that has potential therapeutic value for ASD and related conditions."I'm rather interested in this work and the potential for at least some cases of autism as and when replicative work is undertaken. I note in other patents from this group (see here) the idea that peptides with a neurotrophic link might have some application to "neural pathologies where BDNF levels are dysregulated" is one that has been embraced.The authors, the late Inge Grundke-Iqbal & Khalid Iqbal, have a pretty impressive peer-reviewed track record based to a large extent on their work on neurodegeneration and "abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau" as the main component of the tangles in Alzheimer's disease. Indeed, these findings have particular relevance recently (see here). Applying their, and their research groups, expertise to autism is most definitely an asset, albeit with the requirement for quite a bit more research in this area.To close: The Stone Roses - She Bangs the Drums.---------- [1] Kazim SF. et al. Sera from Children with Autism Induce Autistic Features Which Can Be Rescued with a CNTF Small Peptide Mimetic in Rats. PLoS ONE. 2015; 10(3): e0118627.----------Kazim, S., Cardenas-Aguayo, M., Arif, M., Blanchard, J., Fayyaz, F., Grundke-Iqbal, I., & Iqbal, K. (2015). Sera from Children with Autism Induce Autistic Features Which Can Be Rescued with a CNTF Small Peptide Mimetic in Rats PLOS ONE, 10 (3) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0118627... Read more »

  • March 28, 2015
  • 07:23 PM
  • 42 views

Genetic Fingerprint May Lead To Blood Test For Colon Cancer

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Professor Massimiliano Mazzone and Professor Hans Prenen Lab of Molecular Oncology and Angiogenesis VIB Vesalius Research Center University of Leuven Leuven Belgium Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: … Continue reading →
The post Genetic Fingerprint May Lead To Blood Test For Colon Cancer appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Professor Massimiliano Mazzone and Professor Hans Prenen. (2015) Genetic Fingerprint May Lead To Blood Test For Colon Cancer. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 28, 2015
  • 05:15 PM
  • 42 views

Living Past 100 May Be In Your Genes

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Thomas Perls, MD, MPH Professor Boston University School of Medicine Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Perls:   For years now, Gerontology scholars continue to state that 25% of what they interchangeably call aging, … Continue reading →
The post Living Past 100 May Be In Your Genes appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Thomas Perls, MD, MPH Professor. (2015) Living Past 100 May Be In Your Genes. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 28, 2015
  • 04:27 AM
  • 113 views

Screening for autism in preterm infants

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"A positive screen on the M-CHAT [Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers] occurs more commonly in very preterm infants than those born at term."So said the study by Peter Gray and colleagues [1] as the topic of preterm status - that is, babies born alive before 37 weeks of pregnancy - potentially being linked to a greater risk of autism or at least, increased risk of screening positive for autism, crops up yet again on this blog (see here).Gray et al examined a cohort of children born at the very boundaries of the definition of preterm ("≤30weeks gestation") when aged 2 years old, questioning mums of preterm children (n=97) and mums of term infants (n=77) with a whole range of questionnaires / schedules including the M-CHAT and the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) among other things. "Previously collected data from the mothers at 12months - the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scales (EPDS)" were also analysed.Authors reported that a higher percentage of preterm kids "screened positive on the M-CHAT" compared with term controls (13.4% vs. 3.9% respectively). These statistics decreased somewhat as a consequence of "an M-CHAT follow-up interview by phone" with only one child with membership of the preterm group subsequently receiving a diagnosis of autism from the entire cohort. The authors discuss some of the whys and wherefores of those pretermers who initially screened positive on the M-CHAT and how they were: "born to younger, non-Caucasian mothers and were of lower birth weight and had a higher incidence of being small for gestational age."As per my discussion on the paper by Alexa Guy and colleagues [2] (see here again), the message coming through about using M-CHAT with the preterm population is again one of 'use with caution'. Indeed, the Gray paper illustrates how the follow-up consultation is a pretty important part of M-CHAT, something further developed on by the findings from Diana Robins and colleagues [3] and the whole M-CHAT-R/F thing (see here). I wouldn't necessarily say that M-CHAT is completely useless as a screen for autism under certain conditions. Merely that looking for the early red flags that might denote autism is very much still a work in progress potentially confounded by length of gestation. YouTube video anyone?Music: PJ Harvey- The Words That Maketh Murder.----------[1] Gray PH. et al. Screening for autism spectrum disorder in very preterm infants during early childhood. Early Hum Dev. 2015 Mar 9;91(4):271-276.[2] Guy A. et al. Infants Born Late/Moderately Preterm Are at Increased Risk for a PositiveAutism Screen at 2 Years of Age. J Pediatrics. 2014. 5 December.[3] Robins DL. et al. Validation of the modified checklist for Autism in toddlers, revised with follow-up (M-CHAT-R/F). Pediatrics. 2014 Jan;133(1):37-45.----------Gray PH, Edwards DM, O'Callaghan MJ, & Gibbons K (2015). Screening for autism spectrum disorder in very preterm infants during early childhood. Early human development, 91 (4), 271-276 PMID: 25766314... Read more »

  • March 28, 2015
  • 04:00 AM
  • 39 views

How to Protect Yourself from Sun Rays With An Umbrella

by Crystals and Catalysts in Crystals and Catalysts

Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is an electromagnetic wave. It comes from the sun and travels to the surface of the Earth. While UVR is vital to human (it provides us with the essential vitamin, vitamin D), but it can also cause harm especially to the eye and skin such as burn, hyperpigmentation, photoaging skin, keratoconjunctivitis, stimulation of photodermatoses and cutaneous cancer.This is why we need different methods of protection from the harmful and potentially damaging sun rays. The types of protection can be split into the two categories: Chemical protection (sunscreen) and Physical protection such as using hats, garments, sunglasses.Umbrellas are also a great method of protection from the sun and one of the ways to protect yourself from UVR due to its convenience, availability as well as its ability to protect one from rain. However, there are only few studies on UVR protection efficacy of different types of umbrellas and no clear conclusions can be drawn.A new study conducted by Vejakupta et al aimed to evaluate UVR photoprotection efficacies of umbrellas with different canvases (umbrellas with UVR-filter coating on the inner surface of the canvas, umbrellas with UVR-filter coating on the outer surface of the canvas and umbrellas with plain canvas) as well as umbrellas with different diameters (112 cm, 122 cm and 152 cm).The final results show that all types of umbrellas do provide UVR photo protection efficacy. The study shows that umbrellas with different canvas material including both the UV-filter coating and different diameter of umbrellas could effectively protect the user from UVR without significant group difference in this study.Published by Scientific Research Publishing (SCIRP)Share this Image On Your SitePlease include attribution to http://crystalsandcatalysts.blogspot.co.uk/ with this graphic.Vejakupta, K., & Udompataikul, M. (2014). Umbrella with Ultraviolet Radiation Protection Journal of Cosmetics, Dermatological Sciences and Applications, 04 (04), 228-233 DOI: 10.4236/jcdsa.2014.44031... Read more »

Vejakupta, K., & Udompataikul, M. (2014) Umbrella with Ultraviolet Radiation Protection. Journal of Cosmetics, Dermatological Sciences and Applications, 04(04), 228-233. DOI: 10.4236/jcdsa.2014.44031  

  • March 27, 2015
  • 08:28 PM
  • 93 views

Psoriasis: Effective Two Year Response to IL-17A Antagonist Cosentyx

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Andrew Blauvelt, M.D., M.B.A. President and Investigator Research Excellence & Personalized Patient Care Portland, OR 97223 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Blauvelt: A2303E1 is a multicenter, double-blind, … Continue reading →
The post Psoriasis: Effective Two Year Response to IL-17A Antagonist Cosentyx appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Andrew Blauvelt, M.D., M.B. (2015) Psoriasis: Effective Two Year Response to IL-17A Antagonist Cosentyx . MedicalResearch.com. info:/

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