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  • March 3, 2014
  • 10:14 PM
  • 398 views

Is the rearfoot pattern the most frequently foot strike pattern among recreational shod distance runners?

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Is the rearfoot pattern the most frequently foot strike pattern among recreational shod distance runners?... Read more »

  • March 3, 2014
  • 08:08 PM
  • 1,066 views

this-months-nature-methods-part-1: Spinach, blue transcription & photoacoustic imaging

by Gal Haimovich in Green Fluorescent Blog

This month’s Nature Methods issue has several interesting imaging items & articles, including two super-resolution reviews, two optogenetics articles, and more. This post will be dedicated to three items in the “tools in brief” section. Blue transcription Optogenetics usually refers to … Continue reading →... Read more »

Tools in brief. (2014) Imaging: Activatable photoacoustic probes. Nature Methods, 11(3), 230-230. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.2868  

Motta-Mena LB, Reade A, Mallory MJ, Glantz S, Weiner OD, Lynch KW, & Gardner KH. (2014) An optogenetic gene expression system with rapid activation and deactivation kinetics. Nature chemical biology, 10(3), 196-202. PMID: 24413462  

Song W, Strack RL, Svensen N, & Jaffrey SR. (2014) Plug-and-Play Fluorophores Extend the Spectral Properties of Spinach. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 136(4), 1198-201. PMID: 24393009  

  • March 3, 2014
  • 01:20 PM
  • 374 views

Research shows how fat stem cells may pave the way for facial reconstruction

by beredim in Stem Cells Freak

Child with microtiaA new study by researchers at the Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the UCL Institute of Child Health (ICH) shows that adipose (fat) derived stem cells may be a viable alternative to the currently used approaches for facial cartilage reconstruction, like ear and nose reconstruction.GOSH already has a good track record of successfully treating patients born with a malformed or missing ear, a condition known as microtia. The two-stage ear reconstruction takes cartilage fro........ Read more »

  • March 3, 2014
  • 09:14 AM
  • 520 views

Behavioral Weight-Loss in Serious Mental Illness

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are at higher risk for obesity.This risk may be related to physical inactivity, diet or the weight gain commonly associated with psychotropic drug use.Few clinical trials for weight loss have targeted individuals with serious mental illness (SMI). This population may pose specific challenges in recruitment, adherence and outcome.Gail Daumit and colleagues recently published a randomized clinical trial of behavioral weight loss in a cohort with S........ Read more »

Daumit GL, Dickerson FB, Wang NY, Dalcin A, Jerome GJ, Anderson CA, Young DR, Frick KD, Yu A, Gennusa JV 3rd.... (2013) A behavioral weight-loss intervention in persons with serious mental illness. The New England journal of medicine, 368(17), 1594-602. PMID: 23517118  

  • March 3, 2014
  • 04:53 AM
  • 362 views

Vitamin D and autism: a continuing saga

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The "sunshine vitamin" that is vitamin D has cropped up quite a few times on this blog for all manner of reasons. The suggestion of a link (whatever that means) between vitamin D and the autism spectrum conditions has received the lion's share of coverage, be that in relation to measured levels of vitamin D (see here and see here) or more speculatively, the possible impact of something like deficiency of vitamin D to symptoms or physiology (see here and see here). I've also not been adverse to t........ Read more »

  • March 3, 2014
  • 01:50 AM
  • 582 views

The Impenetrable Bulwark of Vaccination Lies

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

America has a problem. Some people are spouting the lie that vaccines can cause autism and other people are believing them. This has led to some unfortunate false-equivalence when the issue is discussed, and wouldn’t you know it, that false equivalence makes people less likely to believe the truth. Sometimes there’s no false equivalence; people […]... Read more »

Nyhan, B., Reifler, J., Richey, S., & Freed, G.L. (2014) Effective Messages in Vaccine Promotion: A Randomized Trial. Pediatrics. info:/

  • March 3, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 455 views

Smaller Groups and More Supervision May Be Necessary for Baseline Testing in Younger Athletes

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Younger athletes (10-12 year olds) have more invalid baseline ImPACT exams compared to older athletes (13-18 year olds). This is most pronounced when younger athletes are tested in large groups in a nonclinical setting.... Read more »

  • March 3, 2014
  • 12:04 AM
  • 891 views

Influence of Temperature on Calcium Carbonate Polymorph formed from Ammonium Carbonate and Calcium Acetate

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

This research used ammonium carbonate and calcium acetate in the preparation of various calcium carbonate polymorphs for biomimetic composite applications. Biominerals were synthesized at temperatures ranging from 25 to 80 °C to investigate the effect of synthesis temperature on the abundance of vaterite, aragonite, and calcite, delineating regions that are favorable for the formation of these different calcium carbonate polymorphs... Read more »

Philip G Malone, Kevin Torres-Cancel, Robert D Moser, Allison PG, Rae Gore E, Mei Q Chandler, Charles A Weiss, Jr.*. (2014) Influence of Temperature on Calcium Carbonate Polymorph formed from Ammonium Carbonate and Calcium Acetate. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-6. info:/1: 105

  • March 1, 2014
  • 07:25 PM
  • 936 views

Impossible Binaries? Eating Disorders Among Trans Individuals

by Andrea in Science of Eating Disorders


Recently I was doing some research for an upcoming (and very exciting)  endeavour that involves exploring eating disorders among LGBTQ individuals. As one does, I set about scouring the research literature in this area in the hopes of stumbling across some prior articles on which to hang my proverbial research hat.
As I sifted through the databases, however, my searches kept coming up short. After sending out a call to a list-serv enquiring about the state of the field in this area, I rec........ Read more »

  • February 28, 2014
  • 10:53 PM
  • 781 views

Evaluation of Physicochemical Characteristics of Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified by 5ß-cholanic acid to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. The goal of this research was therefore to investigate the physicochemical properties of hydrophobica........ Read more »

Amanda Chin, Giulia Suarato, Yizhi Meng. (2014) Evaluation of Physicochemical Characteristics of Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-7. info:/1: 104

  • February 28, 2014
  • 02:39 PM
  • 1,110 views

This Month In Blastocystis Research (FEB 2014) - The Protease Edition

by Christen Rune Stensvold in Blastocystis Parasite Blog

The February issue of This Month In Blastocystis Research is mostly about Blastocystis proteases and their potential clinical significance. ... Read more »

Fayer R, Elsasser T, Gould R, Solano G, Urban J Jr, & Santin M. (2014) Blastocystis tropism in the pig intestine. Parasitology research. PMID: 24535732  

Denoeud F, Roussel M, Noel B, Wawrzyniak I, Da Silva C, Diogon M, Viscogliosi E, Brochier-Armanet C, Couloux A, Poulain J.... (2011) Genome sequence of the stramenopile Blastocystis, a human anaerobic parasite. Genome biology, 12(3). PMID: 21439036  

Olivo-Diaz A, Romero-Valdovinos M, Gudiño-Ramirez A, Reyes-Gordillo J, Jimenez-Gonzalez DE, Ramirez-Miranda ME, Martinez-Flores WA, Martinez-Hernandez F, Flisser A, & Maravilla P. (2012) Findings related to IL-8 and IL-10 gene polymorphisms in a Mexican patient population with irritable bowel syndrome infected with Blastocystis. Parasitology research, 111(1), 487-91. PMID: 22287022  

Puthia MK, Vaithilingam A, Lu J, & Tan KS. (2005) Degradation of human secretory immunoglobulin A by Blastocystis. Parasitology research, 97(5), 386-9. PMID: 16151742  

Wawrzyniak I, Texier C, Poirier P, Viscogliosi E, Tan KS, Delbac F, & El Alaoui H. (2012) Characterization of two cysteine proteases secreted by Blastocystis ST7, a human intestinal parasite. Parasitology international, 61(3), 437-42. PMID: 22402106  

Sio SW, Puthia MK, Lee AS, Lu J, & Tan KS. (2006) Protease activity of Blastocystis hominis. Parasitology research, 99(2), 126-30. PMID: 16518611  

  • February 28, 2014
  • 08:01 AM
  • 829 views

REGENERATIVE MEDICINE AND YOU: GROWING LUNGS IN THE LAB

by Amy Swanston in Antisense Science

You might remember back in 2008 reading about how scientists had made a breakthrough in regenerative medicine by engineering a human trachea. Since then people have been wondering if the same principles could be applied to more complex body parts. The answer? Yes. Scientists in Texas have grown functioning lungs by using damaged ones as a scaffold to grow new tissue.... Read more »

Nichols JE, Niles JA, & Cortiella J. (2012) Production and utilization of acellular lung scaffolds in tissue engineering. Journal of cellular biochemistry, 113(7), 2185-92. PMID: 22573544  

  • February 28, 2014
  • 04:21 AM
  • 400 views

Asthma as a risk factor for autism?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I start with a quote from the paper by Po-Hsin Tsai and colleagues [1]: "This prospective study indicated a temporal relation between asthma and subsequent ASD [autism spectrum disorder] diagnosis, supporting the immune hypothesis of ASD pathogenesis". Based on a familiar collaboration residing in Taiwan (see here and see here for some discussions on previous data), yet more evidence is emerging of a correlation between immune function, physiology and behavioural / developmental c........ Read more »

  • February 27, 2014
  • 08:10 PM
  • 764 views

Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified by 5ß-cholanic acid to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. The goal of this research was therefore to investigate the physicochemical properties of hydrophobica........ Read more »

Amanda Chin, Giulia Suarato, Yizhi Meng. (2014) Evaluation of Physicochemical Characteristics of Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-7. info:/1: 104

  • February 27, 2014
  • 12:39 AM
  • 853 views

Nanotechnology and Smart Materials for “More than Moore” – It’s a Small World After All!

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

Ever since Gordon Moore fore told about the future of the integrated circuit (IC) back in 1965 [1], Moore’s law was not only an accurate forecast of the achievements that microelectronics community has made, but also was a yardstick of the appropriate level of the commercial development in microelectronics for the past five decades. Such an amazing pace of the IC technology development was possible essentially because of simple two-dimensional (2D) structure of the metal-oxide-semiconducto........ Read more »

Jeong Bong Lee. (2014) Nanotechnology and Smart Materials for “More than Moore” – It’s a Small World After All!. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-3. info:/1: 102

  • February 26, 2014
  • 08:10 AM
  • 870 views

Strange Insects Taste

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

New research is describing the ways that arthropods use gustatory receptors. Drosophila use a muscular reflex to extend or retract the proboscis, based on the sweet or bitter taste they experience. In silica studies are showing that female behaviors are driving gene duplication and evolution of taste receptor genes, while specific taste receptors are responsible for male female interactions in fruit fly courtship rituals.
... Read more »

Briscoe AD, Macias-Muñoz A, Kozak KM, Walters JR, Yuan F, Jamie GA, Martin SH, Dasmahapatra KK, Ferguson LC, Mallet J.... (2013) Female behaviour drives expression and evolution of gustatory receptors in butterflies. PLoS genetics, 9(7). PMID: 23950722  

  • February 26, 2014
  • 04:48 AM
  • 415 views

Pregnancy paracetamol use and offspring ADHD traits?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Poor old paracetamol (acetaminophen if you wish).Tablets (before tablets again) @ WikipediaFirst it was the Brandlistuen correlation [1] suggesting that sustained exposure in-utero may impact on childhood developmental outcome (see here for my take). Now another swipe has been taken at this pharmaceutical stalwart of pain relief / fever reduction with the publication of results by Zeyan Liew and colleagues [2] suggesting that: "Maternal acetaminophen use during preg........ Read more »

  • February 26, 2014
  • 03:56 AM
  • 351 views

Discovery of a 'conductor' in muscle development may impact future treatments of muscular diseases

by beredim in Stem Cells Freak

Dr. Jean-François CôtéA team of researchers, led by Jean-François Côté, researcher at the IRCM, has identified a "conductor" in the development of muscle tissue. The researchers say that ther discovery may an important impact on the treatment of muscular diseases such as myopathies and muscular dystrophies."For several years, we have been studying myogenesis, a process by which muscles are formed during embryonic development. During the last step of this process, muscle cel........ Read more »

Hamoud N, Tran V, Croteau LP, Kania A, & Côté JF. (2014) G-protein coupled receptor BAI3 promotes myoblast fusion in vertebrates. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 24567399  

  • February 26, 2014
  • 03:46 AM
  • 317 views

Nuclear stiffness keeps stem cells and cancer cells in place

by beredim in Stem Cells Freak

Dennis DischerAdult stem cells and cancer cells have many things in common, including their ability to migrate through tiny gaps in tissue. They  also experience a trade-off when it comes to this ability; having a flexible nucleus makes migration easier but is worse at protecting the nucleus’ DNA compared to a stiffer nucleus. Nuclear proteins that regulate nuclear stiffness are therefore thought to control processes as diverse as tissue repair and tumor growth.Now a new study by researchers ........ Read more »

Harada T, Swift J, Irianto J, Shin JW, Spinler KR, Athirasala A, Diegmiller R, Dingal PC, Ivanovska IL, & Discher DE. (2014) Nuclear lamin stiffness is a barrier to 3D migration, but softness can limit survival. The Journal of cell biology. PMID: 24567359  

  • February 26, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 553 views

Cardiovascular Screening Practices in College Athletics has Room for Improvement

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

While many screening methods for sudden cardiac death exist, a large proportion of institutions do not employ noninvasive cardiac screening. The most commonly reported reasons why noninvasive cardiac screening is not used was lack of evidence to support its effectiveness and cost.... Read more »

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