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  • July 17, 2014
  • 02:47 AM
  • 421 views

Blood lead levels and childhood behaviour

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Blood lead concentrations, even at a mean concentration of 6.4 µg/dL, were associated with increased risk of behavioral problems in Chinese preschool children, including internalizing and pervasive developmental problems". That was the conclusion of the study by Jianghong Liu and colleagues [1] looking at blood lead levels in preschoolers aged 3-5 years resident in Jiangsu province in China. Some associated media accompanying this study can be viewed here including the text: "This re........ Read more »

Liu, J., Liu, X., Wang, W., McCauley, L., Pinto-Martin, J., Wang, Y., Li, L., Yan, C., & Rogan, W. (2014) Blood Lead Concentrations and Children’s Behavioral and Emotional Problems. JAMA Pediatrics. DOI: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.332  

  • July 16, 2014
  • 08:17 PM
  • 613 views

The Mediterranean Diet and Cognitive Decline

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The Mediterranean diet, it may have broad health benefits [let's face it we can't seem to escape the push for it here in the US], but a new study suggests that […]... Read more »

Koyama, A., Houston, D., Simonsick, E., Lee, J., Ayonayon, H., Shahar, D., Rosano, C., Satterfield, S., & Yaffe, K. (2014) Association Between the Mediterranean Diet and Cognitive Decline in a Biracial Population. The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glu097  

  • July 16, 2014
  • 12:14 PM
  • 478 views

What's so funny? Deconstructing humor

by Teodora Stoica in CuriousCortex

The laughter spills out of her like a jar of coins enriching the nearby surroundings. How does this burst of vocalized joy, unique in this form only to our species, define our personalities and impact our social relationships? A recent study of humor in children explains where the funny bone is: your brain.... Read more »

Vrticka, P., Black, J., Neely, M., Walter Shelly, E., & Reiss, A. (2013) Humor processing in children: Influence of temperament, age and IQ. Neuropsychologia, 51(13), 2799-2811. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.09.028  

Vrticka Pascal, Michelle Neely, Elizabeth Walter Shelly, & Allan L. Reiss. (2013) Humor processing in children: Influence of temperament, age and IQ. Neuropsychologia, 51(13), 2799-2811. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.09.028  

  • July 16, 2014
  • 09:37 AM
  • 388 views

Video Tip of the Week: VectorBase, for invertebrate vectors of human pathogens

by Mary in OpenHelix

I wish I had been clever enough to coordinate this week’s Video Tip of the Week with “Mosquito Week” a couple of months back. There was a bunch of chatter at that time about this infographic that was released by Bill Gates, which illustrated the contribution of various human-killing species. The mosquito was deemed: The […]... Read more »

Megy K., D. Lawson, D. Campbell, E. Dialynas, D. S. T. Hughes, G. Koscielny, C. Louis, R. M. MacCallum, S. N. Redmond, & A. Sheehan. (2012) VectorBase: improvements to a bioinformatics resource for invertebrate vector genomics. Nucleic Acids Research, 40(D1). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkr1089  

  • July 16, 2014
  • 08:05 AM
  • 1,079 views

East To West And Back Again

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Sunflowers were named by Linnaeus for their round shape and bright color that reminded him of the sun, not because they follow the sun. But they do seem to turn to face the sun each day. A new review has looked at the molecular mechanisms that control the movement of the apex of the plant. But questions remain – how does the plant turn back to the east at night? Why is it that the flower turns but the leaves do not? Why does the movement stop when the flower matures?... Read more »

  • July 16, 2014
  • 04:50 AM
  • 658 views

Organic acids as biomarkers of autism?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Whilst I am always a little cautious about the use of the word 'biomarker' when applied to a heterogeneous condition like autism, even the autisms, I am nevertheless always intrigued at any reasonable prospect reported in the scientific literature. So it was when I read the paper by Joanna Kałużna-Czaplińska and colleagues [1] and their assertion that "there is a significant metabolic difference between autistic and non-autistic children" and onwards that "21 metabolites were identified ........ Read more »

  • July 16, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 511 views

Feel Like Phoning-In Your Concussion Symptoms? Not so Fast

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Athletes who have sustained a concussion exhibit a wide range of symptom severity scores when surveyed through text-messaging at various times during the day.... Read more »

  • July 15, 2014
  • 10:07 PM
  • 428 views

Absurd, but Ture?

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

A look at the 'obesity paradox' and its ramifications.... Read more »

Bergman, R., Stefanovski, D., Buchanan, T., Sumner, A., Reynolds, J., Sebring, N., Xiang, A., & Watanabe, R. (2011) A Better Index of Body Adiposity. Obesity, 19(5), 1083-1089. DOI: 10.1038/oby.2011.38  

Gruberg, L., Weissman, N., Waksman, R., Fuchs, S., Deible, R., Pinnow, E., Ahmed, L., Kent, K., Pichard, A., Suddath, W.... (2002) The impact of obesity on the short-term andlong-term outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention: the obesity paradox?. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 39(4), 578-584. DOI: 10.1016/S0735-1097(01)01802-2  

Lavie, C., McAuley, P., Church, T., Milani, R., & Blair, S. (2014) Obesity and Cardiovascular Diseases. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 63(14), 1345-1354. DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2014.01.022  

Lavie, C., De Schutter, A., Patel, D., Romero-Corral, A., Artham, S., & Milani, R. (2012) Body Composition and Survival in Stable Coronary Heart Disease. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 60(15), 1374-1380. DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2012.05.037  

McAuley, P., & Blair, S. (2011) Obesity paradoxes. Journal of Sports Sciences, 29(8), 773-782. DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2011.553965  

  • July 15, 2014
  • 01:30 PM
  • 642 views

Schizophrenia and Autism: A New Connection

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Autism and Schizophrenia, at first glance there probably isn’t a whole lot in common other than they are disorders that fall in that lovely book the DCM-5. The brain is […]... Read more »

Chie Shimamoto1,, Tetsuo Ohnishi, Motoko Maekawa, Akiko Watanabe, Hisako Ohba, Ryoichi Arai, Yoshimi Iwayama, Yasuko Hisano, Tomoko Toyota, Manabu Toyoshima.... (2014) Functional characterization of FABP3, 5 and 7 gene variants identified in schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder and mouse behavioral studies. Human Molecular Genetics. info:/10.1093/hmg/ddu369

  • July 15, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,034 views

The Pressure of the World Cup Penalty Kick

by THE 'SCOPE in The 'Scope

Tim Howard was brilliant in goal for the United States at the 2014 World Cup. Flying all over the place, catching, punching, kicking – he looked like he was protecting his family home from post-apocalyptic cannibals. It was very impressive, but the US went out against Belgium 2-1 in extra time, despite Howard’s 17 saves, the most in a single World Cup game in 50 years. Tim Howard had a great game for the US, heck, a great tournament. So great in fact, that Wikipedia temporarily&nbs........ Read more »

BENJAMIN NOËL and JOHN VAN DER KAMP. (2012) Gaze behaviour during the soccer penalty kick: An investigation of the effects of strategy and anxiety. Int. J. Sport Psychol., 1-20. info:/

  • July 15, 2014
  • 03:38 AM
  • 779 views

Treating Sports Injuries The Drug Free Way

by Pushkar Sikka in Workout Trends

Did you just roll your ankle while playing your favorite sport? Has the back pain been bothering you for a while now? Or did your knee just suffer a bang because of that fall? One of the methods here may just be the answer of getting relief from that pain and treating it the drug free way. […]
The post Treating Sports Injuries The Drug Free Way appeared first on .
... Read more »

Garra G, Singer AJ, Leno R, Taira BR, Gupta N, Mathaikutty B, & Thode HJ. (2010) Heat or cold packs for neck and back strain: a randomized controlled trial of efficacy. Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 17(5), 484-9. PMID: 20536800  

French SD, Cameron M, Walker BF, Reggars JW, & Esterman AJ. (2006) A Cochrane review of superficial heat or cold for low back pain. Spine, 31(9), 998-1006. PMID: 16641776  

  • July 15, 2014
  • 03:21 AM
  • 364 views

Wisconsin researchers report new genetic recipe to turn stem cells to blood

by beredim in Stem Cells Freak

Igor SlukvinA group led by University of Wisconsin-Madison stem cell researcher Igor Slukvin reported yesterday the discovery of two genetic programs responsible for taking blank-slate stem cells and turning them into both red and the array of white cells that make up human blood.The research is important because it identifies how nature itself makes blood products at the earliest stages of development. The discovery gives scientists the tools to make the cells themselves, investigate how blood ........ Read more »

Irina Elcheva, Vera Brok-Volchanskaya, Akhilesh Kumar, Patricia Liu, Jeong-Hee Lee, et al. (2014) Direct induction of haematoendothelial programs in human pluripotent stem cells by transcriptional regulators. Nature Communications. info:/10.1038/ncomms5372

  • July 14, 2014
  • 11:08 PM
  • 1,245 views

Post-traumatic amnesia: why Kramer can’t remember his play in the World Cup Final

by Shelly Fan in Neurorexia

Image: screamer.deadspin.com It was 17 minutes into his second World Cup appearance when German midfielder Christoph Kramer slammed brutally into his Argentine opponent. Kramer’s head swerved...... Read more »

  • July 14, 2014
  • 01:13 PM
  • 584 views

Schizophrenic Noise and Schizophrenic Voices

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Hear that voice? What is there more than one? Is this real, or fake? How do you know? That is how schizophrenia works: auditory hallucinations, confusion, inability to tell what […]... Read more »

Teal S. Eich,, Derek Evan Nee,, Catherine Insel,, Chara Malapani,, & Edward E. Smith. (2014) Neural Correlates of Impaired Cognitive Control over Working Memory in Schizophrenia. Biological psychiatry, 76(2). info:/10.1016/j.biopsych.2013.09.032

  • July 14, 2014
  • 10:44 AM
  • 618 views

Cognitive Reserve Boosts Traumatic Brain Injury Recovery

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Cognitive reserve (high educational attainment, high IQ) is known to reduce or delay the risk for Alzheimer's disease.However, the effect of cognitive reserve on recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI) is less well studied.Two recent research studies support the beneficial effects of cognitive reserve on TBI.Schneider and colleagues examined a series of 769 adult TBI subjects using the TBI Model Systems Database.This cohort was followed during rehabilitation for a period of at least one year......... Read more »

Schneider EB, Sur S, Raymont V, Duckworth J, Kowalski RG, Efron DT, Hui X, Selvarajah S, Hambridge HL, & Stevens RD. (2014) Functional recovery after moderate/severe traumatic brain injury: a role for cognitive reserve?. Neurology, 82(18), 1636-42. PMID: 24759845  

  • July 14, 2014
  • 05:02 AM
  • 644 views

Joint hypermobility, gait and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I have already made mention of the paper by Maya Shetreat-Klein and colleagues [1] on this blog as part of a post on the potential usefulness of kata training for at least some people on the autism spectrum (see here). Based on an analysis of 38 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and a similar number of asymptomatic controls (all medication free), researchers set about recording "the characteristics of gait and prevalence of toe walking, the range of passive joint mobility, a........ Read more »

  • July 14, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 908 views

Pitching: We Can Have too Much of a Good Thing

by Mark Rice in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Young pitchers who engage in “risk-prone” pitching activities are more likely to report arm tiredness and pain, which is related to shoulder and elbow injuries.... Read more »

Yang, J., Mann, B., Guettler, J., Dugas, J., Irrgang, J., Fleisig, G., & Albright, J. (2014) Risk-Prone Pitching Activities and Injuries in Youth Baseball: Findings From a National Sample. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(6), 1456-1463. DOI: 10.1177/0363546514524699  

  • July 13, 2014
  • 03:15 PM
  • 472 views

New ways to test for Alzheimers

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Accurately diagnosing alzheimer’s is not an easy thing to do. In fact most of the time people aren’t diagnosed until very late in the progression of the disease, long after […]... Read more »

Matthew E Growdon,, Aaron Schultz,, Alexander Dagley,, Rebecca Amariglio,, Trey Hedden,, Dorene M. Rentz,, Keith Johnson,, Reisa Sperling,, Mark W. Albers,, & Gad Marshall,. (2014) Olfactory identification and Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in clinically normal elderly. Nature Neuroscience. info:/

  • July 13, 2014
  • 05:21 AM
  • 809 views

Hotter, Smarter, Better Brains

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

It is evident that (a) higher body temperature leads to higher brain performance and (b) the sames holds true in an evolutionary context in terms of brain size. So hotter = smarter? [Infographic]... Read more »

James F. Gillooly. (2013) Hotter is Smarter: The temperature-dependence of brain size in vertebrates. PeerJ. info:/10.7287/peerj.preprints.155v1

Wright KP Jr, Hull JT, & Czeisler CA. (2002) Relationship between alertness, performance, and body temperature in humans. American journal of physiology. Regulatory, integrative and comparative physiology, 283(6). PMID: 12388468  

  • July 12, 2014
  • 07:02 PM
  • 873 views

Legal highs – not for human consumption

by DJMac in Recovery Review

Legal highs in Lothian The UK has the largest market for new psychoactive substances (NSP or “legal highs”) in Europe. Scotland is no stranger to them and, as a seminar in Edinburgh heard last week, the Lothian area is seeing a surge in demand, some worrying trends in injecting and significant new presentations due to problems [...]
The post Legal highs – not for human consumption appeared first on Recovery Review.
... Read more »

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