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  • June 30, 2014
  • 09:05 AM
  • 912 views

WHY FORGETFULNESS IS ACTUALLY CLEVER: SHATTERING THE STEREOTYPES- GUEST POST FROM JACK GUNTER

by Jack Gunter in Antisense Science

Now there’s a sentence I bet you never thought you’d see. Have your parents ever misplaced their keys? Walked into the room and forgotten why they were there? Put things away in a ‘safe’ place which means they are never found again or somehow got your name confused with that of the family dog? This is no exaggeration, mine actually have!

Often people associate this type of forgetfulness with a lack of intelligence in comparison to those who don’t suffer from thes........ Read more »

  • June 30, 2014
  • 04:37 AM
  • 453 views

AAP policy statement on iodine deficiency and pollutants

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The quite recent policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) drafted by Rogan and colleagues [1] is the source for today's short(ish) post. Highlighting a growing concern on the issue of iodine deficiency in women of reproductive age, the policy document also raises awareness of "commonly encountered environmental chemicals" potentially exacerbating such deficiency, and in particular "thiocyanate, nitrate and perchlorate". These chemicals are specifically mentioned because of ........ Read more »

  • June 29, 2014
  • 11:55 PM
  • 926 views

Safety of Intranasal Fentanyl in the Out-of-Hospital Setting - A Prospective Observational Study

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

I have been very critical of plans to have first responders treat people they suspect of having a heroin (or other) opioid overdose with naloxone.

Would first responders be safer with fentanyl?

It is not really the same question, but it does highlight the differences and why I think fentanyl is safer. The patient will be seen by someone more likely to recognize when the treatment is inappropriate. This study looked at IN (IntraNasal) fentanyl given by basic EMTs prior to transport to the E........ Read more »

  • June 29, 2014
  • 11:18 AM
  • 745 views

Evidence based medicine – holding things back?

by DJMac in Recovery Review

A drugs worker told me a few years back that he would never refer a patient to a recovery service on the basis that he would not be following the evidence base. I did ask him at the time ‘but what if that’s not what the client wants?’ It seemed the evidence base came first. [...]
The post Evidence based medicine – holding things back? appeared first on Recovery Review.
... Read more »

Greenhalgh T, Howick J, Maskrey N, & Evidence Based Medicine Renaissance Group. (2014) Evidence based medicine: a movement in crisis?. BMJ (Clinical research ed.). PMID: 24927763  

  • June 29, 2014
  • 07:39 AM
  • 486 views

A gluten-free diet for asymptomatic patients with coeliac disease

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The tip of the iceberg? @ Wikipedia Today I'd like to focus on the paper by Kalle Kurppa and colleagues [1] and their suggestion that: "GFDs [gluten-free diets] benefit asymptomatic EMA-positive [endomysial antibody] patients" with coeliac (celiac) disease in mind.Asymptomatic, when it comes to a condition like coeliac disease (CD) - an autoimmune condition linked to the consumption of gluten - is not necessarily all that surprising given the numbers of cases w........ Read more »

Kurppa K, Paavola A, Collin P, Sievänen H, Laurila K, Huhtala H, Päivi Saavalainen, Mäki M, & Kaukinen K. (2014) Benefits of a Gluten-free diet for Asymptomatic Patients with Serologic Markers of Celiac Disease. Gastroenterology. PMID: 24837306  

  • June 28, 2014
  • 11:19 PM
  • 999 views

Predicting the Flu

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Using search engines to predict the future of infectious diseases: computer science meets epidemiology. [Infographic]... Read more »

  • June 28, 2014
  • 06:22 PM
  • 528 views

Running with a minimalist shoe increases plantar pressures

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Running with a minimalist shoe increases plantar pressures... Read more »

Bergstra, S., Kluitenberg, B., Dekker, R., Bredeweg, S., Postema, K., Van den Heuvel, E., Hijmans, J., & Sobhani, S. (2014) Running with a minimalist shoe increases plantar pressure in the forefoot region of healthy female runners. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.06.007  

  • June 28, 2014
  • 01:57 PM
  • 1,172 views

On Luck, Skill and Hard Work - in Soccer and Life

by Aurametrix team in Health Technologies

Big data doesn't always get us closer to truth. Especially if there a fair bit of luck involved. And many think this applies to football/soccer games (Sally and Anderson, for example, say that soccer results are 50% luck). Yet data analysis provides valuable, sometimes counter-intuitive insights into this beautiful sport and the science of winning and losing in general.How many measurable elements of a soccer game contribute to the outcome? 2014 FIFA world cup's statistics page displays scores c........ Read more »

Javier López Peña, & Hugo Touchette. (2012) A network theory analysis of football strategies. In C. Clanet (ed.), Sports Physics: Proc. 2012 Euromech Physics of Sports Conference, p. 517-528, \'Editions de l'\'Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, 2013. (ISBN 978-2-7302-1615-9). arXiv: 1206.6904v1

Cotta, C., Mora, A., Merelo, J., & Merelo-Molina, C. (2013) A network analysis of the 2010 FIFA world cup champion team play. Journal of Systems Science and Complexity, 26(1), 21-42. DOI: 10.1007/s11424-013-2291-2  

Padulo J, Haddad M, Ardigò LP, Chamari K, & Pizzolato F. (2014) High frequency performance analysis of professional soccer goalkeepers: a pilot study. The Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness. PMID: 24921614  

  • June 28, 2014
  • 12:37 PM
  • 750 views

Quinoa is high in Protein and Stimulates Protein Synthesis via Phytoecdysteroids

by AB Kirk in Stiff Competition

I’m not sure where Quinoa falls on the dietary good-evil spectrum these days.  Many value it for its high protein and mineral content.  It can be a staple food for the health-minded vegetarian.  On the other side of the spectrum, Quinoa has been on the do-not-eat list for followers of the Paleo diet because advocates […]
The post Quinoa is high in Protein and Stimulates Protein Synthesis via Phytoecdysteroids appeared first on WODMasters: Stiff Competition.
... Read more »

  • June 28, 2014
  • 03:25 AM
  • 453 views

On parental inflammatory bowel disease and offspring autism risk

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Ane Birgitte Telén Andersen and colleagues [1] (open-access here) concluding "no evidence of an increased risk of ASD [autism spectrum disorders] among children born to parents with IBD [inflammatory bowel disease]" caught my eye recently.Qays and Layla @ Wikipedia Based on an analysis of one of those Danish Registries which seem to be providing all-manner of important correlations and non-correlations, the authors looked for the presence of parental IBDs such a........ Read more »

  • June 27, 2014
  • 05:08 AM
  • 525 views

Scurvy, vitamin C and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'd been thinking about writing this post on scurvy, vitamin C and autism for quite a while. The paper by Kitcharoensakkul and colleagues [1] really made the decision for me, following their discussions on three young children with walking difficulties who were eventually diagnosed with scurvy, one of whom was diagnosed with autism. The authors concluded: "These clinical manifestations and radiologic findings highlight the importance for rheumatologists to have a higher index of suspicion f........ Read more »

Kitcharoensakkul M, Schulz CG, Kassel R, Khanna G, Liang S, Ngwube A, Baszis KW, Hunstad DA, & White AJ. (2014) Scurvy revealed by difficulty walking: three cases in young children. Journal of clinical rheumatology : practical reports on rheumatic , 20(4), 224-8. PMID: 24847751  

  • June 26, 2014
  • 09:54 PM
  • 474 views

Sensory deficits in runners with an overuse injury

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Sensory deficits in runners with an overuse injury... Read more »

  • June 26, 2014
  • 07:32 PM
  • 734 views

The Dollars and Cents of Eating Disorders

by Andrea in Science of Eating Disorders


I must admit that I cringe slightly every time I try to think about healthcare from an economics perspective. To me, this comes a little close to putting a dollar value on human beings, which feels uncomfortably post-humanistic to me. Nonetheless, there is no ignoring the ways in which economic concerns factor into policy decisions that drive our human services, including health care.
There are also a number of pragmatic reasons for thinking about the costs associated with illnesses; talki........ Read more »

Crow S. (2014) The economics of eating disorder treatment. Current psychiatry reports, 16(7), 454. PMID: 24817201  

  • June 26, 2014
  • 04:44 AM
  • 435 views

Increased rates of suicidal ideation in adults with Asperger syndrome

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Our findings lend support to anecdotal reports of increased rates of suicidal ideation in adults with Asperger's syndrome, and depression as an important potential risk factor for suicidality in adults with this condition".Sunrise @ Wikipedia That was the very stark conclusion reached by the study by Sarah Cassidy and colleagues [1] (open-access) looking at self-reported rates of suicide ideation and suicide plans/attempts in a sample of adults newly diagnosed with Asperger syndr........ Read more »

Sarah Cassidy, Paul Bradley, Janine Robinson, Carrie Allison, Meghan McHugh, & Simon Baron-Cohen. (2014) Suicidal ideation and suicide plans or attempts in adults with Asperger's syndrome attending a specialist diagnostic clinic: a clinical cohort study. Lancet Psychiatry. info:/doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(08)61345-8

  • June 25, 2014
  • 01:00 PM
  • 702 views

Anti-aging drug has a Catch… but not for Long

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Dietary restriction holds the key to longevity. It’s no secret that as you drastically reduce calories, your metabolism will slow down with it [ask anyone who's tried to crash diet […]... Read more »

Yu Z, Wang R, Fok WC, Coles A, Salmon AB, & Pérez VI. (2014) Rapamycin and Dietary Restriction Induce Metabolically Distinctive Changes in Mouse Liver. The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences. PMID: 24755936  

  • June 25, 2014
  • 12:00 PM
  • 1,006 views

ANIMAL TESTING: COSMETICS, BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH AND ETHICS

by Robb Hollis in Antisense Science

Animal testing is an incredibly controversial subject, with strong opinions on both sides. Whilst animal testing for cosmetics has now been banned in the EU, animals continue to be used in science, where they serve a vital role in biomedical research and drug development. Their importance is often overshadowed by the ethical issues surrounding the treatment of animals in research environments, and it’s important that people understand why and how they are used, as well as what measures ar........ Read more »

Hajar, R. (2011) Animal testing and medicine. Heart Views, 12(1), 42. DOI: 10.4103/1995-705X.81548  

  • June 25, 2014
  • 09:37 AM
  • 523 views

Video Tip of the Week: Leukemia outcome predictions challenge

by Mary in OpenHelix

Although I had other tips in the pipeline, I’m bumping this one up because it is time sensitive. It’s about a competition (or challenge, as they describe it) to use data from cases of leukemia to model make predictions about the outcomes, which could help drive treatment decisions someday. It is called the Acute Myeloid […]... Read more »

Boutros Paul C, Kyle Ellrott, Thea C Norman, Kristen K Dang, Yin Hu, Michael R Kellen, Christine Suver, J Christopher Bare, Lincoln D Stein, & Paul T Spellman. (2014) Global optimization of somatic variant identification in cancer genomes with a global community challenge. Nature Genetics, 46(4), 318-319. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.2932  

  • June 25, 2014
  • 08:15 AM
  • 969 views

They Can See The Blood Running Through You

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Vampire bats sense heat via pit organs in their nose-leaves, but they find their victims by sight, smell and echolocation. New research shows that an alternatively spliced version of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 is responsible for the heat sensing, but what do they use it for? Their teeth are so short that they must find blood vessels close to the surface – shallow vessels give off more heat than do deep vessels or skin where there is no large vessel.

Vampire bats occasionally feed on ........ Read more »

Patel R, Ispoglou S, & Apostolakis S. (2014) Desmoteplase as a potential treatment for cerebral ischaemia. Expert opinion on investigational drugs, 23(6), 865-73. PMID: 24766516  

Gracheva EO, Cordero-Morales JF, González-Carcacía JA, Ingolia NT, Manno C, Aranguren CI, Weissman JS, & Julius D. (2011) Ganglion-specific splicing of TRPV1 underlies infrared sensation in vampire bats. Nature, 476(7358), 88-91. PMID: 21814281  

  • June 25, 2014
  • 04:33 AM
  • 440 views

Silence ENO2! More epigenetics and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Yu Wang and colleagues [1] (open-access here) concluded that: "reduced ENO2 expression may be a biomarker for a subset of autistic children" following their genome-wide methylation study of autism. For those who've picked up the word 'methylation' in that first sentence, this is yet another sign that epigenetics - the science of changes to gene function not entailing structural genomic changes - is starting to impact on autism research.Silentio! @ Wikipedia Based on an ini........ Read more »

Wang Y, Fang Y, Zhang F, Xu M, Zhang J, Yan J, Ju W, Brown WT, & Zhong N. (2014) Hypermethylation of the enolase gene (ENO2) in autism. European journal of pediatrics. PMID: 24737292  

  • June 24, 2014
  • 01:34 PM
  • 928 views

Autism and Pesticides: What, too obvious?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

There have been a few different things linked to children who fall under the Autism Spectrum Disorder. A combination of genetic and environmental factors, along with complications during pregnancy have been associated […]... Read more »

Shelton, J., Geraghty, E., Tancredi, D., Delwiche, L., Schmidt, R., Ritz, B., Hansen, R., & Hertz-Picciotto, I. (2014) Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Prenatal Residential Proximity to Agricultural Pesticides: The CHARGE Study. Environmental Health Perspectives. DOI: 10.1289/ehp.1307044  

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