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  • October 8, 2014
  • 08:51 PM
  • 664 views

Foot Orthotics for Reducing Load in the Plantar Fascia

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Foot Orthotics for Reducing Load in the Plantar Fascia... Read more »

  • October 8, 2014
  • 04:34 AM
  • 837 views

Alcohol and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I tread very carefully with this post today looking at some of the peer-reviewed research on the topic of alcohol use (and abuse) and autism without wishing to stigmatise nor generalise.I was brought to this important topic as a result of the recent paper by Tabata and colleagues [1] who discussed three case reports of alcoholism associated with a diagnosis of autism. For each person described in that report, a common theme describing alcohol being used as a means to "reduce anxiety" related to ........ Read more »

Tabata K, Yoshida T, & Naoe J. (2014) Three cases of alcoholism with autism spectrum disorder. Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire). PMID: 25221235  

  • October 8, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 766 views

Stronger May not be Better in Decreasing the Risk of High Magnitude Head Impacts in Football

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Football players with greater cervical neck muscle strength and size were as likely to sustain larger head impacts as their peers. Football players who had greater cervical stiffness and an ability to decrease the displacement of their head following perturbation were less likely to sustain a moderate and severe head impacts.... Read more »

Schmidt, J., Guskiewicz, K., Blackburn, J., Mihalik, J., Siegmund, G., & Marshall, S. (2014) The Influence of Cervical Muscle Characteristics on Head Impact Biomechanics in Football. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(9), 2056-2066. DOI: 10.1177/0363546514536685  

  • October 7, 2014
  • 05:00 PM
  • 626 views

The Blood-Brain Barrier and the Future of Medicine

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The blood-brain barrier, not quite a brick and mortar defense from the outside world, but strangely enough it is extremely effective. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) acts as a bouncer, it keeps the bad things out, while helping to regulate certain aspects of the brain. To circumvent the BBB thousands of people have stimulators placed deep in their brains in the hope of curing their ills. Many require tubes, catheters, and shunts penetrating deep into their brain ventricles to deliver medicine or t........ Read more »

  • October 7, 2014
  • 04:21 PM
  • 766 views

Personality, Emotion and Psychopathology: David Watson Lecture Notes

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

I had the privilege to attend today the William K Warren Frontiers in Neuroscience Conference in Tulsa, OK by Dr. David Watson from Notre Dame University.Dr. Watson's lecture was titled: An integrative model of personality, emotion and psychopathology. This lecture summarized a body of research examining personality, psychological symptoms and a variety of brain disorders.Here are my lecture notes and links to relevant research citations. The first two citations have links to a free full-te........ Read more »

Stasik SM, Naragon-Gainey K, Chmielewski M, & Watson D. (2012) Core OCD symptoms: exploration of specificity and relations with psychopathology. Journal of anxiety disorders, 26(8), 859-70. PMID: 23026094  

  • October 7, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,293 views

Get Some Sleep - Your Brain Will Thank You

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

We all know we should get more sleep, but new research is showing that it isn’t just a good idea, it preserves brain structure and function. Sleep loss affects learning, and new studies show that sleep deprivation can cause irreversible neuron loss in the locus coeruleus, and that depression associated with lack of sleep can reduce hippocampus size. In fatal familial insomnia, the prion plaques destroy the thalamus and indicate a decrease in mitochondrial function – the same type pro........ Read more »

  • October 7, 2014
  • 05:02 AM
  • 484 views

Infection during pregnancy and offspring autism risk

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Lee and colleagues [1] forms the starting material for today's blog post looking at hospitalisation for infection during pregnancy as potentially being a risk factor for receipt of a subsequent diagnosis for autism in offspring."Chaos is what killed the dinosaurs, darling"Based on data derived from one of those very useful Scandinavian health registries, authors observed "approximately a 30% increase in ASD [autism spectrum disorder] risk associated with any inpatient diag........ Read more »

Lee BK, Magnusson C, Gardner RM, Blomström S, Newschaffer CJ, Burstyn I, Karlsson H, & Dalman C. (2014) Maternal hospitalization with infection during pregnancy and risk of autism spectrum disorders. Brain, behavior, and immunity. PMID: 25218900  

  • October 6, 2014
  • 04:36 AM
  • 474 views

Correcting vitamin D levels improves fatigue severity?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I was interested to read the paper by Satyajeet Roy and colleagues [1] (open-access here) concluding that: "Normalization of vitamin D levels with ergocalciferol therapy significantly improves the severity of... fatigue symptoms". Ergocalciferol by the way, means vitamin D2, which is distinct from cholecalciferol (vitamin D3), the seemingly more desirable form of vitamin D supplementation (see here)."It's beyond my control"The Roy paper is open-access but a few details might be useful:........ Read more »

  • October 6, 2014
  • 03:33 AM
  • 1,449 views

Old people are immune against the cocktail party effect

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Imagine standing at a cocktail party and somewhere your name gets mentioned. Your attention is immediately grabbed by the sound of your name. It is a classic psychological effect with a new twist: old people are immune. The so-called cocktail party effect has fascinated researchers for a long time. Even though you do not consciously […]... Read more »

Naveh-Benjamin M, Kilb A, Maddox GB, Thomas J, Fine HC, Chen T, & Cowan N. (2014) Older adults do not notice their names: A new twist to a classic attention task. Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition. PMID: 24820668  

  • October 5, 2014
  • 05:09 PM
  • 582 views

The Playing Ground Part Two

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

Does the removal of park benches from a playground increase physical activity in adults and children?... Read more »

  • October 5, 2014
  • 01:43 PM
  • 774 views

Using “Programmable” Antibiotics to Attack Drug-Resistant Microbes

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The body is pretty great at self regulation, that is up until it isn't. The antibiotic era was one that improved human health hundreds of times over. Unfortunately health is a joint effort, a multitude of microbes scientists have found populating the human body have good, bad and mostly mysterious implications for our health. But when something goes wrong, we defend ourselves with the undiscriminating brute force of traditional antibiotics, which wipe out everything at once like a wild fire, reg........ Read more »

Luciano Marraffini et al. (2014) Exploiting CRISPR-Cas nucleases to produce sequence-specific antimicrobials. Nature Biotechnology. info:/10.1038/nbt.3043

  • October 5, 2014
  • 04:30 AM
  • 1,006 views

Pain needs painkillers – right?

by DJMac in Recovery Review

Overprescribing of opioid painkillers has caused harm to many people including addiction, loss of social functioning and, increasingly though still relatively uncommonly in the UK, to death. Concerns have been raised about deaths associated with tramadol. I’ve written before about the lack of evidence of effectiveness for opiates in chronic pain, but it is hard for [...]
The post Pain needs painkillers – right? appeared first on Recovery Review.
... Read more »

  • October 4, 2014
  • 02:47 PM
  • 721 views

The Path of Antibiotic Resistance

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

MRSA, not that long ago we had no idea what MRSA was… mostly because it hadn’t come into prevalence. With an increase in the use and abuse of antibiotics there has been an ever growing pressure for the pathogens we treat to mutate in order to survive, this pressure is called selective pressure and helped cause drug-resistance in pathogens. In response to the rise of these drug-resistant pathogens, doctors are routinely cautioned against over prescribing antimicrobials. But when a patient has........ Read more »

Kouyos RD, Metcalf CJ, Birger R, Klein EY, Abel Zur Wiesch P, Ankomah P, Arinaminpathy N, Bogich TL, Bonhoeffer S, Brower C.... (2014) The path of least resistance: aggressive or moderate treatment?. Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society, 281(1794). PMID: 25253451  

  • October 4, 2014
  • 11:33 AM
  • 715 views

The Underwear Fetish Brain?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

According to a Japanese case report, a man developed a fetish for women’s underwear due to decreased brain blood flow. Here’s how neuropsychiatrists Koji Masuda and colleagues describe the patient: A 24-year-old male patient who was arrested for stealing underwear and referred to our hospital for evaluation. The patient had stolen women’s underwear on multiple […]The post The Underwear Fetish Brain? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Koji Masuda, Yoshinobu Ishitobi, Yoshihiro Tanaka, & Jotao Akiyoshi. (2014) Underwear fetishism induced by bilaterally decreased cerebral bloodflow in the temporo-occipital lobe. BMJ Case Rep. info:/

  • October 4, 2014
  • 04:57 AM
  • 600 views

The gut-brain axis and schizophrenia

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A micropost to direct your attention to the recent paper by Katlyn Nemani and colleagues [1] titled: 'Schizophrenia and the gut-brain axis'. Mentioning words like that, I couldn't resist offering a little exposure to this review and opinion piece, drawing on what seems to be some renewed research interest in work started by pioneers such as the late Curt Dohan [2].The usual triad of gastrointestinal (GI) variables - gut barrier, gut bacteria and gut immune function - are mentioned in the article........ Read more »

Nemani, K., Ghomi, R., McCormick, B., & Fan, X. (2014) Schizophrenia and the gut–brain axis. Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2014.08.018  

  • October 3, 2014
  • 10:38 AM
  • 620 views

Pediatric respiratory tract infections and antibiotics: overprescribing?

by Aurelie in Coffee break Science

Antimicrobial resistance is a serious threat to human health. As the WHO global report published in April 2014 highlighted, it is no longer a concern for the future but happening right now, in every part of the world. It threatens … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 08:40 AM
  • 384 views

The Friday Five for 10/3/2014

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

The coolest science of the week, including the physics of space battles, leeches eating worms, and how to get others to do your bidding!... Read more »

O'Shea TJ, Cryan PM, Cunningham AA, Fooks AR, Hayman DT, Luis AD, Peel AJ, Plowright RK, & Wood JL. (2014) Bat flight and zoonotic viruses. Emerging infectious diseases, 20(5), 741-5. PMID: 24750692  

  • October 3, 2014
  • 05:10 AM
  • 461 views

S100B and schizophrenia meta-analysed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I don't know if it's just me but this year (2014) I seem to be covering a lot more meta-analysis papers on this blog. I assume that's because of the increasing volume of peer-reviewed research being created year-on-year leading to greater volumes of research fodder for such grand reviews. Whatever the reason(s), there are some really interesting conclusions being reached in that literature as per the meta-analysis by Aleksovska and colleagues [1] (open-access) focusing on S100B bl........ Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 07:46 PM
  • 792 views

Ambivalence and Eating Disorders: Inpatient Treatment, Belonging, and Identity

by Andrea in Science of Eating Disorders


When Tetyana Tweeted and “Tumblr-ed” (is there a better name for putting something on Tumblr?) a quote from a qualitative research article about ambivalence and eating disorders, I knew I would want write a blog post about it. Of course, life happened, and so this post is coming a little later than I had intended. Nonetheless, I am happy to be sharing a post about a fresh article by Karin Eli (2014) about eating disorders and ambivalence in the inpatient hospital setting. The article i........ Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 11:01 AM
  • 719 views

Parenting: Genetics and Environmental Effects

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Effective parenting is a key element in child development.Both genetic and environmental factors appear to contribute to the cognitive, emotional and behavioral aspects of parenting.Childhood temperament also influences the process of parenting. A well-behaved, emotionally stable and loving child is obviously much easier to parent than a child with behavioral and emotional problems.Bonamy Oliver and colleagues from the United Kingdom have recently published an informative twin study of pare........ Read more »

Oliver BR, Trzaskowski M, & Plomin R. (2014) Genetics of parenting: The power of the dark side. Developmental psychology, 50(4), 1233-40. PMID: 24364831  

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