Post List

Computer Science / Engineering posts

(Modify Search »)

  • September 6, 2014
  • 06:22 PM
  • 831 views

Is the Internet of Things the Real Thing?

by Aurametrix team in Health Technologies

The Internet of Things: an exciting new world with a digital nervous system or a nightmare where objects take decisions while we are unconscious?15 years ago, when the term was first coined, it was about assigning everything around us a unique identity with RFID tags, to enable all material things to talk to each other and save us time for gathering and using information. As RFID tags dropped below 1 cent cost, and sensors, modems and devices are getting smaller, smarter and cheaper, this vision is moving closer to reality.The latest Gartner's Hype Cycle (August 2014) places the Internet of Things at the peak of Inflated Expectations, while Big Data evolving in tandem with IoT has already started to fall into the through of disillusionment, getting ready to join mobile health and cloud computing right there on the bottom of the through. Consumers are not ready to embrace the flood of smart wearables and appliances - as they don't really know what to do with them, don't perceive their value and are concerned about privacy and prices.Clay Christensen's theory of "disruptive technology" emphasizes that technologies tend to get better at a faster rate than users' needs increase. Next Big Thing often starts as an expensive "toy". When the telephone was first introduced it could only be afforded by the rich and it could only carry a signal over a short distance. If Watson really had said in 1943 that "there is a world market for maybe five computers", as Gordon Bell pointed out much later, it would have held true for some ten years.The first generation of IoT devices fell short of user needs and was rather primitive. Over a third of people who bought a smart wearable abandoned it a few months later. Yet, the "new" has never been hotter. It seems a new wearable is launching every week and we are constantly waiting for something newer and better, hoping it will finally answer the question "what can we do now that we could not do before?"However, the current generation of "smart things" is focused mostly on better designed hardware and higher-end consumers. Fashionable elegant-looking devices are supposed to make wearables more appealing and "design thinking" is one of today's hottest buzzwords. Withings Activité, Fitbit pendants from Tory Burch,  Yves Béhar's designed Vessyl, Diane Von Furstenberg's Google glass, Rebecca Minkoff's tech-enabled jewelry, and the new bracelet from Intel - MICA  - highlighted by pearls and other precious stones - are getting ready to conquer attention of consumers and developers. Especially developers - as the size of the market will depend on the number of developer-entrepreneurs creating value in it.The app economy taught hardware manufacturers that when people experiment they find ways to create value, often in unexpected ways.  But it also taught developers that they need to invest considerable time to build a marketable app and the chances of that app to make money are about 1 in 25,000. As the average age of developers keeps decreasing getting into the middle and high school years, the main benefit of app development becomes education and learning by itself. But will this be sufficient for the Internet of Things or will inter-networked things remain a toy for the wealthy? ReferencesAshton K. (2009). That 'Internet of Things' Thing, in the real world things matter more than ideas RFID Journal (June 22)Gartner's "Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2014" at http://www.gartner.com/document/2809728Harvard's Clayton Christensen on the economics of 'disruption' (techflash.com)Schreier G (2014). The internet of things for personalized health. Studies in health technology and informatics, 200, 22-31 PMID: 24851958Perera, C., Zaslavsky, A., Christen, P., & Georgakopoulos, D. (2014). Sensing as a service model for smart cities supported by Internet of Things Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies, 25 (1), 81-93 DOI: 10.1002/ett.2704Anderson J. amd Rainie L. (2014) The Internet of Things Will Thrive by 2025. Pew researchMackinlay M. (2013). Phases of Accuracy Diagnosis: (In)visibility of System Intersect, Vol 6, No 2... Read more »

Ashton K. (2009) That 'Internet of Things' Thing, in the real world things matter more than ideas. RFID Journal. info:/

Schreier G. (2014) The internet of things for personalized health. Studies in health technology and informatics, 22-31. PMID: 24851958  

Perera, C., Zaslavsky, A., Christen, P., & Georgakopoulos, D. (2014) Sensing as a service model for smart cities supported by Internet of Things. Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies, 25(1), 81-93. DOI: 10.1002/ett.2704  

  • September 1, 2014
  • 11:15 PM
  • 784 views

Falsifiability and Gandy’s variant of the Church-Turing thesis

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

In 1936, two years after Karl Popper published the first German version of The Logic of Scientific Discovery and introduced falsifiability; Alonzo Church, Alan Turing, and Emil Post each published independent papers on the Entscheidungsproblem and introducing the lambda calculus, Turing machines, and Post-Turing machines as mathematical models of computation. The years after saw many […]... Read more »

Gandy, R. (1980) Church's thesis and principles for mechanisms. Studies in Logic and the Foundations of Mathematics, 123-148. DOI: 10.1016/S0049-237X(08)71257-6  

  • August 30, 2014
  • 02:54 PM
  • 835 views

Direct mind-to-mind communication in humans

by Shelly Fan in Neurorexia

Image credit: www.techspot.com Here’s something right out of science fiction: a team of neuroscientists in Spain developed a system that allows a person to transmit the...... Read more »

Grau C, Ginhoux R, Riera A, Nguyen TL, Chauvat H, Berg M, Amengual JL, Pascual-Leone A, & Ruffini G. (2014) Conscious Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans Using Non-Invasive Technologies. PloS one, 9(8). PMID: 25137064  

  • August 28, 2014
  • 04:53 PM
  • 626 views

This is your Brain. This is your Brain on Drugs

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Drugs are bad for the brain. That is (excuse the horrible pun) a no-brainer, but while scientists have seen the after effect drugs have on the brain, we have never seen how they affect the blood flow to the brain. That is of course, until now. A new method for measuring and imaging how quickly blood flows in the brain could help doctors and researchers better understand how drug abuse affects the brain and they are currently testing this new method as we speak.... Read more »

  • August 27, 2014
  • 03:23 PM
  • 537 views

The Learning Brain Unravelled

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

As an engineer you would think math would come easy to me, it didn’t. Funny thing though, science in general and biology in particular came very easy to me. The big question is why? Why would math, something I need to know how to do for my work and my degree, be so hard to learn? Thankfully science has stepped in to answer the question, at least partially, about why somethings can come so easy to a person and other things (like me and math) take so much longer to pick up.[…]... Read more »

Patrick T. Sadtler,, Kristin M. Quick,, Matthew D. Golub,, Steven M. Chase,, Stephen I. Ryu,, Elizabeth C. Tyler-Kabara,, Byron M. Yu,, & Aaron P. Batista. (2014) Neural constraints on learning. Nature. info:/10.1038/nature13665

  • August 27, 2014
  • 09:46 AM
  • 669 views

Fluid-injection could act as 'trigger' for large earthquakes

by This Science is Crazy! in This Science Is Crazy!

New study investigates whether fluid-injection techniques (such as fracking, solution mining and enhanced geothermal)can generate enough stress to set off large quakes prematurely... Read more »

Mulargia, F., & Bizzarri, A. (2014) Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes. Scientific Reports, 6100. DOI: 10.1038/srep06100  

  • August 26, 2014
  • 01:27 PM
  • 829 views

The Holographic Universe [we might Live in!]

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Are you feeling a little… flat? Well that might be because you are only in 2 dimensions. I know what you’re thinking, insane! Well first check the name of the business and second, check out the science. In fact, it may seem like a joke, but the math suggests that it could very well be true and with it could come a deeper understanding of the universe. Testing this hypothesis (which was first made in the late 90’s) has been harder to do than you might think, but that has now changed. We are officially checking to see if our universe is a hologram![…]... Read more »

  • August 23, 2014
  • 01:30 PM
  • 541 views

An end to Finger Pricking for Diabetics

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

About 10% of the US is diabetic, that doesn’t sound like a lot until you realize how many people there are in the US (roughly 311 million and counting). Think about it like this, every 7 seconds (roughly) a child is born. With that statistic every minute and 10 seconds leads to another person with diabetes. By the time you finish reading this, about two people in the US will be diagnosed with diabetes.[…]... Read more »

Liakat S, Bors KA, Xu L, Woods CM, Doyle J, & Gmachl CF. (2014) Noninvasive in vivo glucose sensing on human subjects using mid-infrared light. Biomedical optics express, 5(7), 2397-404. PMID: 25071973  

  • August 21, 2014
  • 08:03 AM
  • 494 views

Payment System Protects Privacy of EV Owners

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A new electronic payment system created at A*STAR aims to protect the privacy of EV owners recharging their electric cars.... Read more »

Au, M., Liu, J., Fang, J., Jiang, Z., Susilo, W., & Zhou, J. (2014) A New Payment System for Enhancing Location Privacy of Electric Vehicles. IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, 63(1), 3-18. DOI: 10.1109/TVT.2013.2274288  

  • August 20, 2014
  • 03:41 PM
  • 594 views

Cool Burning Flames Could Lead to Better Engines

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A team of international researchers has discovered a new type of cool burning flames that could lead to greener, more efficient combustion engines.... Read more »

Dietrich, D., Nayagam, V., Hicks, M., Ferkul, P., Dryer, F., Farouk, T., Shaw, B., Suh, H., Choi, M., Liu, Y.... (2014) Droplet Combustion Experiments Aboard the International Space Station. Microgravity Science and Technology. DOI: 10.1007/s12217-014-9372-2  

  • August 18, 2014
  • 01:21 PM
  • 559 views

We can Build it Better: The First Artificial Cell Network

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

How does the old saying go? Imitation, is the sincerest form of flattery? Well that is what we’ve been trying to do for a very long time, but mimicking the intricate networks and dynamic interactions that are inherent to living cells is difficult to achieve outside the cell. Unfortunately despite all our intelligence nature has had the upper hand on us for a long time. That has not changed… until now that is.[…]... Read more »

Karzbrun E, Tayar AM, Noireaux V, & Bar-Ziv RH. (2014) Programmable on-chip DNA compartments as artificial cells. Science (New York, N.Y.), 345(6198), 829-32. PMID: 25124443  

  • August 8, 2014
  • 07:27 AM
  • 628 views

Silica Glass Keeps Solar Cells Cool

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A team of scientists led by Shanhui Fan, an electrical engineering professor at Stanford University, has used a specially patterned layer of silica glass to keep solar cells cool by shepherding away unwanted thermal radiation.... Read more »

Zhu, L., Raman, A., Wang, K., Anoma, M., & Fan, S. (2014) Radiative cooling of solar cells. Optica, 1(1), 32. DOI: 10.1364/OPTICA.1.000032  

  • August 8, 2014
  • 07:26 AM
  • 522 views

Prototype Meter Tests Accuracy of Hydrogen Fuel Dispensers

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a prototype field test standard to test the accuracy of hydrogen fuel dispensers.... Read more »

  • August 6, 2014
  • 05:59 PM
  • 593 views

How a smartphone app can tell you if meat is tainted

by This Science is Crazy! in This Science Is Crazy!

US scientists develop a smartphone app that uses Mie scattering to estimate E. coli concentrations in ground beef samples... Read more »

  • August 4, 2014
  • 07:29 AM
  • 710 views

Interview: Battling HIV-treatment With Computer Simulation

by Pieter Carriere in United Academics

Prof. Mancini computationally models HIV and other viruses’ dynamics and explains its clinical relevance.... Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 06:59 AM
  • 550 views

Efficient Room-Temperature Phosphorescent OLEDs Developed

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

The team of Jinsang Kim, a professor of materials science and engineering and chemical engineering at the University of Michigan, developed bright, metal-free, organic, phosphorescent light emitters.... Read more »

  • July 29, 2014
  • 05:00 PM
  • 653 views

A simple and useable classification of software by Aral Balkan via Wuthering Bytes

by Duncan Hull in O'Really?

It’s getting pretty hard to do anything these days that doesn’t involve software. Our governments, businesses, laboratories, personal lives and entertainment would look very different without the software that makes them tick. How can we classify all this software to make sense of it all? The likes of this huge list of software categories on wikipedia are pretty bewildering, and projects such as the Software Ontology (SWO) [1] are attempting to make sense of swathes of software too. There’s lots of software out there.... Read more »

  • July 29, 2014
  • 07:35 AM
  • 576 views

Is Twitter Ruining Our Proper English?

by Katja Keuchenius in United Academics

“Hey al im on my way 2wrk but i totes 4got 2bring ur ipod sori il hav 2 bring it nxt tym ur workin. Hav a nice day xo”
Gives you the cramps? Maybe you should read this article.... Read more »

  • July 28, 2014
  • 02:44 PM
  • 613 views

Watch ALL the neurons in a brain: Ahrens and Freeman continue their reign of terror

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Okay, not quite all of them. But it looks like Misha Ahrens and Jeremy Freeman are going to continue their reign of terror, imaging the whole zebrafish brain as if it’s no big deal. Yeah they’ve got almost every neuron of a vertebrate, so what? Besides figuring out that not shooting light at the eyes might […]... Read more »

Freeman, J., Vladimirov, N., Kawashima, T., Mu, Y., Sofroniew, N., Bennett, D., Rosen, J., Yang, C., Looger, L., & Ahrens, M. (2014) Mapping brain activity at scale with cluster computing. Nature Methods. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.3041  

Vladimirov, N., Mu, Y., Kawashima, T., Bennett, D., Yang, C., Looger, L., Keller, P., Freeman, J., & Ahrens, M. (2014) Light-sheet functional imaging in fictively behaving zebrafish. Nature Methods. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.3040  

  • July 28, 2014
  • 09:14 AM
  • 637 views

Glasses-Free Computers

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Looking at computers with eyeglasses strains your eyes, so scientists are making computers that help your eyes out. [Infographic]... Read more »

Huang, F., Wetzstein, G., Barsky, B., & Raskar, R. (2014) Eyeglasses-free display. ACM Transactions on Graphics, 33(4), 1-12. DOI: 10.1145/2601097.2601122  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.