Post List

Computer Science / Engineering posts

(Modify Search »)

  • March 10, 2014
  • 11:46 PM
  • 488 views

Hydrogen peroxide thermochemical oscillator as driver for primordial RNA replication

by Rowena Ball in The Origins of Life

IN THE beginning, there were no living cells and no proteins in the primordial soup on the pre-biotic earth. The authors proposed and tested the hypothesis that thermal cycling to drive cell-free RNA replication and amplification in this environment may have been provided by a natural hydrogen peroxide thermochemical oscillator. This also provides a mechanism for natural selection and evolution. Results also may answer the (previously unanswerable) question of why new life does not emerge from non-living precursors on the modern earth: Quite simply there is no longer the hydrogen peroxide around that there was in the good old days!... Read more »

Rowena Ball, & John Brindley. (2014) Hydrogen peroxide thermochemical oscillator as driver for primordial RNA replication. Journal of the Royal Society Interface. arXiv: 1402.3875v3

  • March 10, 2014
  • 12:31 PM
  • 329 views

Multiferroic Materials to Increase Energy Efficiency for Computer Processors

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A team led by researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science has made improvements in computer processing using an emerging class of magnetic materials called “multiferroics,” and these advances could make future devices far more energy-efficient than current technologies.... Read more »

Cherepov, S., Khalili Amiri, P., Alzate, J., Wong, K., Lewis, M., Upadhyaya, P., Nath, J., Bao, M., Bur, A., Wu, T.... (2014) Electric-field-induced spin wave generation using multiferroic magnetoelectric cells. Applied Physics Letters, 104(8), 82403. DOI: 10.1063/1.4865916  

  • March 5, 2014
  • 05:24 PM
  • 376 views

Scientists Use Infrared Emissions as Renewable Energy Source

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Physicists at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) envision a device that would harvest energy from Earth’s infrared emissions into outer space.... Read more »

Byrnes, S., Blanchard, R., & Capasso, F. (2014) Harvesting renewable energy from Earth's mid-infrared emissions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1402036111  

  • March 5, 2014
  • 03:36 PM
  • 313 views

Transparent, Colorful Solar Cells Developed

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Transparent, colorful solar cells invented at the University of Michigan could one day be used to make stained-glass windows, decorations and even shades that turn the sun’s energy into electricity.... Read more »

  • March 4, 2014
  • 05:53 PM
  • 399 views

Palm Oil Methane Emissions Can Be Used as Energy Source

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

An analysis published Feb. 26 in the journal Nature Climate Change (see footnote) shows that the wastewater produced during the processing of palm oil is a significant source of heat-trapping methane in the atmosphere. But the researchers also present a possible solution: capturing the palm oil methane and using it as a renewable energy source.... Read more »

Taylor, P., Bilinski, T., Fancher, H., Cleveland, C., Nemergut, D., Weintraub, S., Wieder, W., & Townsend, A. (2014) Palm oil wastewater methane emissions and bioenergy potential. Nature Climate Change, 4(3), 151-152. DOI: 10.1038/nclimate2154  

  • March 3, 2014
  • 06:33 PM
  • 387 views

Ultrathin UV Light Absorber Developed

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Ultraviolet light (UV) has not only harmful effects on molecules and biological tissue like human skin but it also can impair the performance of organic solar cells upon long-term exposure. Researchers of Kiel University and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht have now developed a so-called plasmonic metamaterial, which is compatible with solar technology and completely absorbs UV light—despite being only 20 nanometers thin.... Read more »

Hedayati, M., Zillohu, A., Strunskus, T., Faupel, F., & Elbahri, M. (2014) Plasmonic tunable metamaterial absorber as ultraviolet protection film. Applied Physics Letters, 104(4), 41103. DOI: 10.1063/1.4863202  

  • March 3, 2014
  • 11:41 AM
  • 442 views

Superabsorbing Design Could Make Thin Film Solar Cells Cheaper

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a “superabsorbing” design that may significantly improve the light absorption efficiency of thin film solar cells and drive down manufacturing costs.... Read more »

Yu, Y., Huang, L., & Cao, L. (2014) Semiconductor Solar Superabsorbers. Scientific Reports. DOI: 10.1038/srep04107  

  • March 3, 2014
  • 12:04 AM
  • 545 views

Influence of Temperature on Calcium Carbonate Polymorph formed from Ammonium Carbonate and Calcium Acetate

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

This research used ammonium carbonate and calcium acetate in the preparation of various calcium carbonate polymorphs for biomimetic composite applications. Biominerals were synthesized at temperatures ranging from 25 to 80 °C to investigate the effect of synthesis temperature on the abundance of vaterite, aragonite, and calcite, delineating regions that are favorable for the formation of these different calcium carbonate polymorphs... Read more »

Philip G Malone, Kevin Torres-Cancel, Robert D Moser, Allison PG, Rae Gore E, Mei Q Chandler, Charles A Weiss, Jr.*. (2014) Influence of Temperature on Calcium Carbonate Polymorph formed from Ammonium Carbonate and Calcium Acetate. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-6. info:/1: 105

  • February 28, 2014
  • 10:53 PM
  • 543 views

Evaluation of Physicochemical Characteristics of Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified by 5ß-cholanic acid to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. The goal of this research was therefore to investigate the physicochemical properties of hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) under exposure to lysozyme, a ubiquitous mammalian enzyme. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the CNP vehicles had an average hydrodynamic diameter of 288.6 nm... Read more »

Amanda Chin, Giulia Suarato, Yizhi Meng. (2014) Evaluation of Physicochemical Characteristics of Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-7. info:/1: 104

  • February 28, 2014
  • 06:05 PM
  • 479 views

Offshore Wind Turbines Could Weaken Hurricanes

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Offshore wind turbines placed in the ocean to generate electricity may have another major benefit: weakening hurricanes before the storms make landfall.... Read more »

Jacobson, M., Archer, C., & Kempton, W. (2014) Taming hurricanes with arrays of offshore wind turbines. Nature Climate Change, 4(3), 195-200. DOI: 10.1038/nclimate2120  

  • February 27, 2014
  • 08:10 PM
  • 531 views

Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified by 5ß-cholanic acid to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. The goal of this research was therefore to investigate the physicochemical properties of hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) under exposure to lysozyme, a ubiquitous mammalian enzyme. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the CNP vehicles had an average hydrodynamic diameter of 288.6 nm.... Read more »

Amanda Chin, Giulia Suarato, Yizhi Meng. (2014) Evaluation of Physicochemical Characteristics of Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-7. info:/1: 104

  • February 27, 2014
  • 12:05 PM
  • 354 views

Nickel Foam, Nanotechnology Enable Lightweight Lithium Batteries

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Zhaolin Liu from the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering in Singapore, in collaboration with Aishui Yu and co-workers from Fudan University in China, has developed a carbon nanotube electrode that can alleviate recharging problems in lithium-oxygen batteries, thanks to a support made from three-dimensional nickel foam.... Read more »

  • February 27, 2014
  • 12:39 AM
  • 621 views

Nanotechnology and Smart Materials for “More than Moore” – It’s a Small World After All!

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

Ever since Gordon Moore fore told about the future of the integrated circuit (IC) back in 1965 [1], Moore’s law was not only an accurate forecast of the achievements that microelectronics community has made, but also was a yardstick of the appropriate level of the commercial development in microelectronics for the past five decades. Such an amazing pace of the IC technology development was possible essentially because of simple two-dimensional (2D) structure of the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) field effect transistor (FET) invented by Hofstein and Heiman [2]. Putting more transistors in the same chip was possible simply by decreasing 2D feature size of the IC. The never-ending quest for ever and ever smaller feature size (another word, ever and ever increasing numbers of the transistors) in IC is stunning and gate insulation layer thickness today is only a few layers of oxide and the minimum feature size of the IC is sub-20 nm. While keeping this march becomes more challenging, there is no doubt that this amazing “more Moore” march will continue at least for a couple of more decades thanks to numerous innovations in materials, production technologies and a paradigm shift in design like FinFET [3]. However, “more Moore” by feature size reduction can only go so far and year after year we are getting one step closer to the physical limit.... Read more »

Jeong Bong Lee. (2014) Nanotechnology and Smart Materials for “More than Moore” – It’s a Small World After All!. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-3. info:/1: 102

  • February 26, 2014
  • 03:47 PM
  • 312 views

Lightning Helps Protect Electrical Grid Components

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Researchers at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm are using lightning and other high voltage currents to help utilities track the health of electrical grid components throughout their systems.... Read more »

  • February 26, 2014
  • 03:24 AM
  • 693 views

Get the best of both worlds with Fiji’s Jython interpreter

by Juan Nunez-Iglesias in I Love Symposia!

Fiji is just ImageJ, with batteries included. It contains plugins to do virtually anything you would want to do to an image. Since my go-to programming language is Python, my favorite feature of Fiji is its language-agnostic API, which supports a plethora of languages, including Java, Javascript, Clojure, and of course Python; 7 languages in all. (Find these under Plugins/Scripting/Script Editor.) Read on to learn more about the ins and outs of using Python to drive Fiji.... Read more »

Schindelin J, Arganda-Carreras I, Frise E, Kaynig V, Longair M, Pietzsch T, Preibisch S, Rueden C, Saalfeld S, Schmid B.... (2012) Fiji: an open-source platform for biological-image analysis. Nature methods, 9(7), 676-82. PMID: 22743772  

  • February 24, 2014
  • 07:00 AM
  • 686 views

Biomass-based Nanocomposites and Mesoporous Materials

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals has been rigorously investigated as a response to the depletion of petroleum resources, increasing demand for in oil and secure access to energy. It has been estimated that by 2030 lignocellulosic biomass could supply a substantial portion of the international chemical and transportation fuel market. Lignocellulosic biomass is usually composed of three components: 35-50 wt% cellulose, 20-40 wt% hemicellulose, and 10-25 wt% lignin. While lignocellulose is cheap and abundant forms of biomass, it is difficult to convert to target materials due to the high crystallinity structure and oxygen/carbon ratio. In order to increase the biomass conversion and upgrade bio-oil into fuels (green diesel) and chemicals, oxygen reduction and chemical bonding rearrangement are crucial. Lignocellulose can be depolymerized to C5/C6 fragment by hydrolysis using an acid catalyst such as HCl or H2SO4. Furfuryl alcohol (FA; C5H6O2) and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF, C6H6O3), which can be produced from hemicellulose and cellulose, respectively, by dehydration and decomposition, have been identified as are considered to be a key furan derivatives.... Read more »

Tae Jin Kim. (2014) Biomass-based Nanocomposites and Mesoporous Materials. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-2. info:/1: 103

  • February 22, 2014
  • 09:07 PM
  • 521 views

Modest Data Reported From Oxford Nanopore's Exciting MinION Sequencing Platform

by Geoffrey Hannigan in Prophage

The first data from Oxford Nanopore's promising MinION sequencing platform was released a couple of days ago. The sequencing data was released at the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology Meeting in Florida, and was presented by Dr David Jaffe of the Broad Institute in Cambridge, MA...... Read more »

  • February 22, 2014
  • 11:55 AM
  • 601 views

Nailing down the Yang-Mills problem

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

Millennium problems represent a major challenge for physicists and mathematicians. So far, the only one that has been solved was the Poincaré conjecture (now a theorem) by Grisha Perelman. For people working in strong interactions and quantum chromodynamics, the most interesting of such problems is the Yang-Mills mass gap and existence problem. The solutions of […]... Read more »

Axel Weber. (2012) Epsilon expansion for infrared Yang-Mills theory in Landau gauge. Phys. Rev. D , 125005. arXiv: 1112.1157v2

Marco Frasca. (2007) Infrared Gluon and Ghost Propagators. Phys.Lett.B670:73-77,2008. arXiv: 0709.2042v6

Marco Frasca. (2009) Mapping a Massless Scalar Field Theory on a Yang-Mills Theory: Classical Case. Mod. Phys. Lett. A 24, 2425-2432 (2009). arXiv: 0903.2357v4

Marco Frasca. (2010) Mapping theorem and Green functions in Yang-Mills theory. PoS FacesQCD:039,2010. arXiv: 1011.3643v3

  • February 21, 2014
  • 08:21 AM
  • 461 views

Virtual Customer Service Agents: Any Help?

by Nura Rutten in United Academics

Perhaps you are able to recall this, but there was a time that if you had a question or a complaint, you could go to a building, with a desk, and there was an actual person to talk to and get annoyed with. Nowadays, you type hours of your life away writing emails or filling in contact forms, while being on hold at the customer service for days in a row. However, not long ago, the virtual customer service agent (VCSA) appeared. ... Read more »

  • February 21, 2014
  • 07:37 AM
  • 373 views

Scientists Inject Salmon With Novel Microbatteries

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Scientists have created a microbattery that packs twice the energy compared to current microbatteries used to monitor the movements of salmon through rivers in the Pacific Northwest and around the world.... Read more »

Honghao Chen, Samuel Cartmell, Qiang Wang, Terence Lozano, Z. Daniel Deng, Huidong Li, Xilin Chen, Yong Yuan, Mark E. Gross, Thomas J. Carlson, Jie Xiao. (2014) Micro-battery development for juvenile salmon acoustic telemetry system applications. Scientific Reports. DOI: 10.1038/srep03790  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.