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  • December 21, 2015
  • 09:58 AM
  • 936 views

Slice of PLOS: The Awesomeness of Bats

by Roli Roberts in PLOS Biologue

Just how awesome are bats? It’s easy to forget that one in five species of mammal on this planet have wings capable of delivering spectacularly acrobatic flying abilities. Equally incredibly, two-thirds of these 1,200 species... Read more »

Bergou, A., Swartz, S., Vejdani, H., Riskin, D., Reimnitz, L., Taubin, G., & Breuer, K. (2015) Falling with Style: Bats Perform Complex Aerial Rotations by Adjusting Wing Inertia. PLOS Biology, 13(11). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1002297  

  • November 11, 2015
  • 06:22 AM
  • 847 views

The Dangers of Galactic Cosmic Rays

by Agnese Mariotti in United Academics

Eager to travel to Mars? Think twice!

NASA, galactic cosmic rays, mars, space travel

Explorations of Mars with probes and spacecraft are revealing intriguing features of the Red Planet. The most recent discovery by the NASA spacecraft Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, that liquid water very likely flows on Mars, has stirred enthusiasm among scientists who have been looking for signs of “life-as-we-know-it” on the planet for the last twenty years.

One of the major future goals of ........ Read more »

Parihar, V., Allen, B., Tran, K., Macaraeg, T., Chu, E., Kwok, S., Chmielewski, N., Craver, B., Baulch, J., Acharya, M.... (2015) What happens to your brain on the way to Mars. Science Advances, 1(4). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1400256  

  • November 1, 2015
  • 05:42 AM
  • 989 views

News on propulsion at NASA

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

There has been a lot of rumor on measurements performed by Eagleworks labs at NASA this spring. After that, NASA imposed a veto on whatever information should coming out about the work of this group until peer-reviewed work should have appeared. Most of the problems come out from the question of the EmDrive. This is […]... Read more »

  • September 17, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,688 views

The Martian: Getting Home Is Just Half The Problem

by Mark Lasbury in The 'Scope

"The Martian" movie opens soon! It's about an astronaut stranded on Mars who is trying to survive and find a way to get back home. But today, we humans here on Earth still have to think of clever ways to survive a trip to the red planet in the first place.... Read more »

  • April 7, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,738 views

Star Trek Shields For Tanks

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Star Trek deflectors absorbed or deflected energy beams, but would they work against bullets or asteroids? Scientists are on working on armors and plasma systems that can stop projectiles. In some cases we use explosions to stop explosions. In others, tanks are turned into electrical pulse generators that zap incoming rockets. But the most amazing is the wall of exploding plasma that will be the first true defensive energy shield.... Read more »

Mayseless, M. (2011) Effectiveness of Explosive Reactive Armor. Journal of Applied Mechanics, 78(5), 51006. DOI: 10.1115/1.4004398  

Yoo, Y., Zheng, H., Kim, Y., Rhee, J., Kang, J., Kim, K., Cheong, H., Kim, Y., & Lee, Y. (2014) Flexible and elastic metamaterial absorber for low frequency, based on small-size unit cell. Applied Physics Letters, 105(4), 41902. DOI: 10.1063/1.4885095  

  • March 31, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,597 views

Shields Up! Lay In A Course For Mars

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Deflector shields allowed Star Trek and other sci-fi franchises to have long space battles. Without them, one good strike and everyone was dead – that wouldn’t lend itself to sequels.

We don’t need shields for space battles yet, but we do need them to get to Mars. Cosmic radiation will kill or injure every astronaut unless we can deflect the radiation away from the spacecraft. We’re just about to build real deflectors, and our teachers are the magnetic fields we find ........ Read more »

  • February 10, 2015
  • 07:00 AM
  • 1,816 views

Sometimes Warped Thinking Is A Good Thing

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

As Star Trek’s 50th anniversary approaches, are we getting closer to traveling at light speed? Believe it or not – yes, we are. We have begun to understand and harness the power of antimatter, and the plasma bubble-driven warp drive has moved from silly idea to serious consideration – so much so that NASA has designed a warp drive ship, the IXS Enterprise, of course.... Read more »

S. Beghella-Bartoli, P.M. Bhujbal, A. Nas. (2015) Confirmation of Santilli's detection of antimatter galaxies via a telescope with concave lens. America Journal of Modern Physics, 4(1), 34. info:/

Ganiev, Y., Gordeev, V., Krasilnikov, A., Lagutin, V., Otmennikov, V., & Panasenko, A. (2000) Aerodynamic Drag Reduction by Plasma and Hot-Gas Injection. Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer, 14(1), 10-17. DOI: 10.2514/2.6504  

Ronan Keane, & Wei-Ming Zhang. (2012) Beamed Core Antimatter Propulsion: Engine Design and Optimization. J.Br.Interplanet.Soc. arXiv: 1205.2281v2

  • August 20, 2014
  • 03:41 PM
  • 1,164 views

Cool Burning Flames Could Lead to Better Engines

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A team of international researchers has discovered a new type of cool burning flames that could lead to greener, more efficient combustion engines.... Read more »

Dietrich, D., Nayagam, V., Hicks, M., Ferkul, P., Dryer, F., Farouk, T., Shaw, B., Suh, H., Choi, M., Liu, Y.... (2014) Droplet Combustion Experiments Aboard the International Space Station. Microgravity Science and Technology. DOI: 10.1007/s12217-014-9372-2  

  • March 3, 2014
  • 12:04 AM
  • 1,365 views

Influence of Temperature on Calcium Carbonate Polymorph formed from Ammonium Carbonate and Calcium Acetate

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

This research used ammonium carbonate and calcium acetate in the preparation of various calcium carbonate polymorphs for biomimetic composite applications. Biominerals were synthesized at temperatures ranging from 25 to 80 °C to investigate the effect of synthesis temperature on the abundance of vaterite, aragonite, and calcite, delineating regions that are favorable for the formation of these different calcium carbonate polymorphs... Read more »

Philip G Malone, Kevin Torres-Cancel, Robert D Moser, Allison PG, Rae Gore E, Mei Q Chandler, Charles A Weiss, Jr.*. (2014) Influence of Temperature on Calcium Carbonate Polymorph formed from Ammonium Carbonate and Calcium Acetate. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-6. info:/1: 105

  • February 28, 2014
  • 10:53 PM
  • 1,075 views

Evaluation of Physicochemical Characteristics of Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified by 5ß-cholanic acid to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. The goal of this research was therefore to investigate the physicochemical properties of hydrophobica........ Read more »

Amanda Chin, Giulia Suarato, Yizhi Meng. (2014) Evaluation of Physicochemical Characteristics of Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-7. info:/1: 104

  • February 27, 2014
  • 08:10 PM
  • 1,084 views

Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified by 5ß-cholanic acid to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. The goal of this research was therefore to investigate the physicochemical properties of hydrophobica........ Read more »

Amanda Chin, Giulia Suarato, Yizhi Meng. (2014) Evaluation of Physicochemical Characteristics of Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-7. info:/1: 104

  • July 23, 2013
  • 05:51 AM
  • 992 views

Some more news on Warp drive

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

Today, New York Times published an article with an interview to Harold “Sonny” White about NASA studies on warp drive (see here). This revamped the interest about what NASA is funding (with a really small budget being  just $50,000) on this that have to be considered forefront research. For the readers that are not aware […]... Read more »

Miguel Alcubierre. (2000) The warp drive: hyper-fast travel within general relativity. Class.Quant.Grav.11:L73-L77,1994. arXiv: gr-qc/0009013v1

  • June 19, 2013
  • 02:56 PM
  • 666 views

Automotive Fuel Cells to be Used In Space

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Automotive fuel cells are not only good for powering eco-friendly buses and potentially fuel cell cars, they also can be used in space exploration, according to an article co-authored by the JRC and the European Space Agency (ESA) in the scientific journal Acta Astronautica. The article analyzes the present-day hydrogen activities in the terrestrial and aerospace industries, highlighting possible performance improvements and cost savings.... Read more »

  • June 7, 2013
  • 04:42 AM
  • 672 views

Video: Helicopter Flies by Thought Control

by Andrew Porterfield in United Academics

This video shows a demonstration flight of a new helicopter. But the helicopter isn’t new; the way it’s controlled is. The entire flight was managed by the thoughts of a man wearing a cap with electrodes. The researchers think that if a helicopter can be piloted by detachable electrodes, then these electrodes could be used to make non-invasive limbs for the disabled.... Read more »

  • April 26, 2013
  • 05:27 AM
  • 2,205 views

Tartaglia-Pascal triangle and quantum mechanics

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

The paper I wrote with Alfonso Farina and Matteo Sedehi about the link between the Tartaglia-Pascal triangle and quantum mechanics is now online (see here). This paper contains as a statement my theorem that provides a connection between the square root of a Wiener process and the Schrödinger equation that arose a lot of interest [...]... Read more »

  • January 15, 2012
  • 12:40 PM
  • 2,016 views

can we explore space with unmanned drones?

by Greg Fish in weird things

Drone patrols are nothing new. By now, they're fairly humdrum stuff come to think of it. But what about a drone patrol on an alien world, one that could potentially last for decades and bring us a constant stream of data on everything we wanted to know about the world in question? Well, that's the [...]... Read more »

Barnes, J., Lemke, L., Foch, R., McKay, C., Beyer, R., Radebaugh, J., Atkinson, D., Lorenz, R., Le Mouélic, S., Rodriguez, S.... (2011) AVIATR — Aerial Vehicle for In-situ and Airborne Titan Reconnaissance. Experimental Astronomy. DOI: 10.1007/s10686-011-9275-9  

  • March 21, 2011
  • 06:05 PM
  • 1,726 views

Future of Spaceflight: No single point sollution

by FrauTech in Design. Build. Play.

Too often we look for a single perfect answer to our problems. In the energy crisis people are often disappointed when hybrid batteries are found to be so environmentally unfriendly or that wind power is often incredibly harmful to local bird life or that solar cell arrays often use a lot of water in areas that are pretty arid to begin with.Researchers looking into the future of space flight looked at combining a rocket propellant with an electric sail. An electric sail has some similarities to ........ Read more »

  • February 13, 2011
  • 09:09 AM
  • 1,656 views

Noise of Aviation

by Frautech in Engineer Blogs

What is it that keeps us awake at night? A new study from the German Aerospace Center on sleep patterns showed the unpredictable noises are the most disturbing to our sleep patterns. Noises like an airplane taking off have a more gradual rise and fall in sound despite lasting longer than the passing of a car. And yet in sleep surveys, people report aircraft noise as disturbing their sleep. The study’s authors speculated this was because a typical sleep cycle lasts 20 minutes and so airplan........ Read more »

  • March 4, 2010
  • 06:43 PM
  • 1,963 views

Will the Moon mess up a moon-base?

by Emma in we are all in the gutter


If we want to build a permanent base on the Moon – and the question of whether we ever will (or even should) remains very open – we need to have some idea of the effect the lunar environmental conditions will have on our equipment. There’s no point going to all [...]... Read more »

T. W. Murphy, Jr., E. G. Adelberger, J. B. R. Battat, C. D. Hoyle, R. J. McMillan, E. L. Michelsen, R. Samad, C. W. Stubbs, & H. E. Swanson. (2010) Long-term degradation of optical devices on the moon. Icarus. arXiv: 1003.0713v1

  • February 13, 2009
  • 07:19 AM
  • 3,714 views

Liquid Mirrors

by Andrew Sun in On The Road

Liquid Mirror Telescope

The first time I heard that liquid mirrors worth studying was from a Nature‘s News & Views article. Rotating liquid that creates a parabolic surface enables human to conceive about really big telescopes that have to be built on the moon. The Nature article praised the use of ionic liquid, liquid with ’nearly zero’ vapor pressure, for liquid mirror support, because in the moon the working environment is vacuum. And it is also cold there, so the liqui........ Read more »

A.S. Papadogiannis, N.S. Papadogianni, A. Carabelas, S. Tsitomeneas, P. Kyraggelos, & T.G. Chondros. (2008) The Mirror Weapon in Archimedes Era . Proceedings of EUCOMES 08, 29-36. DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4020-8915-2_4  

Michael A. Bucaro, Paul R. Kolodner, J. Ashley Taylor, Alex Sidorenko, Joanna Aizenberg, & Tom N. Krupenkin. (2008) Tunable Liquid Optics: Electrowetting-Controlled Liquid Mirrors Based on Self-Assembled Janus Tiles. Langmuir, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1021/la803537v  

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