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  • April 15, 2017
  • 04:12 PM
  • 247 views

Perspectives…

by Sergio Graziosi in Writing my own user manual - Sergio Graziosi's Blog

In the past few months I’ve spent some time looking for trouble on Twitter. I’ve found some (mild and polite), which translated into plenty food for thought, and eventually allowed me to put some order in my thoughts. The matter…Read more ›... Read more »

Kahneman, D. (2011) Thinking, Fast and Slow. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. info:other/978-0374275631

  • April 5, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 223 views

Your Black client is much more likely to be wrongfully convicted

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Those of us who’ve been around for a while have heard this repeatedly. But, lest you think times are changing, here’s some sobering data from a March, 2017 report co-edited by a Michigan State University College of Law Professor. From the beginning, this is a disturbing report. Here’s how it starts: African-Americans are only 13% […]... Read more »

Samuel R. Gross, Maurice Possley, & Klara Stephens. (2017) Race and Wrongful Convictions in the United States. . UC Irvine: National Registry of Exonerations. . info:/

  • March 25, 2017
  • 01:06 PM
  • 194 views

Native multilinguals

by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira in Being Multilingual

P { margin-bottom: 0.08in; } Some of my language teaching students sometimes express out loud their heartfelt desire to become native speakers. I was quite baffled the first time I heard this: we’re all native speakers, surely, and we can’t become natives, if we take the word “native” to mean what I supposed it is meant to mean, ‘from birth’. But does it? It turned out that my students’ previous teacher training had included the mantra that “native” means ‘flawless’ in th........ Read more »

  • March 25, 2017
  • 12:40 PM
  • 197 views

Sign-speech multilinguals

by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira in Being Multilingual

P { margin-bottom: 0.08in; } Opinions and decisions about multilingualism involving sign languages suffer from the same resilient fantasies which have plagued multilingualism in general over the past 100 years or so. With sign languages, however, there’s the aggravating factor that fantasies about them join the chorus. Only the other week, for example, I had a couple of (speech-speech) multilingual friends wonder why all the fuss about sign languages among linguists like me, since these lang........ Read more »

Alibali, M., Young, A., Crooks, N., Yeo, A., Wolfgram, M., Ledesma, I., Nathan, M., Breckinridge Church, R., & Knuth, E. (2013) Students learn more when their teacher has learned to gesture effectively. Gesture, 13(2), 210-233. DOI: 10.1075/gest.13.2.05ali  

  • March 20, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 227 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: The SPOT (Spontaneous Preference  for Own Theories) effect 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It’s been a while since we’ve had a new cognitive bias to share with you. Previously we’ve blogged on many different biases and here are a handful of those posts. Today’s research paper combines three biases—two of which we’ve blogged about before: the better-than-average effect, confirmation bias and also, the endowment effect. The endowment effect […]... Read more »

Gregg AP, Mahadevan N, & Sedikides C. (2017) The SPOT effect: People spontaneously prefer their own theories. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 70(6), 996-1010. PMID: 26836058  

  • March 19, 2017
  • 11:14 PM
  • 232 views

3 Study Habits of Successful Students in College

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

Can’t wait to break out of high school and dash off to college? College is a lot of fun. Late nights, parties, sporting events with thousands of people, on-campus concerts and thousands of potential new friends combine to make college some of the best years of a person’s life. Yet, in the midst of all […]
Check out 3 Study Habits of Successful Students in College, an original post on Thinker Academy.
... Read more »

  • March 13, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 217 views

Identifying deception when the witness wears a face-covering veil

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

In 2014, we wrote about research investigating how people felt when a witness wore a veil such as some forms of a hijab or a niqab. Here were some of the findings we described in that research. We’ve written a number of times about bias against Muslims. But here’s a nice article with an easy […]... Read more »

Leach AM, Ammar N, England DN, Remigio LM, Kleinberg B, & Verschuere BJ. (2016) Less is more? Detecting lies in veiled witnesses. Law and Human Behavior, 40(4), 401-10. PMID: 27348716  

  • March 10, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 185 views

Facts [still] don’t matter: the 2017 edition 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

When we began this blog in 2009, the reality that facts don’t matter was one of the first posts we wrote. We wrote again about this reality back in 2011. And we’ve written about it several times since then so…here we go again! In this new era of fake news and fake news allegations, we’ve […]... Read more »

Swire, B., Berinsky, A., Lewandowsky, S., & Ecker, U. (2017) Processing political misinformation: comprehending the Trump phenomenon. Royal Society Open Science, 4(3), 160802. DOI: 10.1098/rsos.160802  

  • March 8, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 249 views

A secret weapon for voir dire: Smart people are more curious

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Back in October of 2016, we wrote about a paper by the Cultural Cognition Project on assessing “scientific curiosity”. Here is some of what we said then about what Kahan and his colleagues found by measuring scientific curiosity: “What they found was that participants who scored higher on the curiosity scale were more likely to […]... Read more »

  • March 1, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 201 views

So maybe it doesn’t pay to be beautiful  

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Or at least, maybe there is no “ugliness penalty” if you are not beautiful. We’ve written a number of times here about the many benefits given to those who are seen as beautiful or attractive. This paper debunks the stereotype and says that salary goes beyond appearance and individual differences matter too. The researchers used […]... Read more »

Kanazawa, S., & Still, MC. (2017) Is there really a beauty premium or an ugliness penalty on earnings?. Journal of Business and Psychology. info:/

  • February 27, 2017
  • 05:29 AM
  • 289 views

Know your brain: Mammillary bodies

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

Where are the mammillary bodies?























The mammillary bodies are part of the diencephalon, which is a collection of structures found between the brainstem and cerebrum. The diencephalon includes the hypothalamus, and the mammillary bodies are found on the inferior surface of the hypothalamus (the side of the hypothalamus that is closer to the brainstem). The mam........ Read more »

Vann SD, & Aggleton JP. (2004) The mammillary bodies: two memory systems in one?. Nature reviews. Neuroscience, 5(1), 35-44. PMID: 14708002  

  • February 19, 2017
  • 01:01 PM
  • 350 views

Using Discourse Analysis to Assess Cognitive Decline

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

Figure from Gauthier et al. (2005).

Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and other dementias are progressive neurodegenerative conditions that unfold over time. Subtle symptoms such as forgetfulness and word finding problems may progress to mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and then escalate to full-blown dementia. Recent efforts to classify prodromal states have included automated analysis of spontaneous... Read more »

Fraser, K., Meltzer, J., & Rudzicz, F. (2015) Linguistic Features Identify Alzheimer’s Disease in Narrative Speech. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 49(2), 407-422. DOI: 10.3233/JAD-150520  

Thomas, C., Keselj, V., Cercone, N., Rockwood, K., . (2005) Automatic detection and rating of dementia of Alzheimer type through lexical analysis of spontaneous speech. IEEE International Conference, 1569-1574. info:/10.1109/ICMA.2005.1626789

  • February 17, 2017
  • 07:01 AM
  • 302 views

Why does music training increase intelligence?

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

We know that music training causes intelligence to increase, but why? In this post I 1) propose a new theory, and 2) falsify it immediately. Given that this particular combination of activities is unpublishable in any academic journal, I invite you to read the whole story here (in under 500 words). 1) Proposing the ISAML Incredible but […]... Read more »

Jones, M., & Boltz, M. (1989) Dynamic attending and responses to time. Psychological Review, 96(3), 459-491. DOI: 10.1037//0033-295X.96.3.459  

Kunert R, & Jongman SR. (2017) Entrainment to an auditory signal: Is attention involved?. Journal of experimental psychology. General, 146(1), 77-88. PMID: 28054814  

Glenn Schellenberg, E. (2004) Music Lessons Enhance IQ. Psychological Science, 15(8), 511-514. DOI: 10.1111/j.0956-7976.2004.00711.x  

  • February 15, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 307 views

Tell it to the judge 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Anyone who has been in court more than a few times, has likely heard a judge “rehabilitate” a potential juror who has expressed bias by asking the juror if they will, in judging “this case”, be “fair, impartial and unbiased”. Why yes, your Honor (say almost all of them). Mykol Hamilton and Kate Zephyrhawke, researchers, […]... Read more »

Charles G. Lord, Lee Ross, & Mark R. Lepper. (1979) Biased Assimilation and Attitude Polarization: The Effects of Prior Theories on Subsequently Considered Evidence. Journal  of Personality and Social Psychology, 37(11), 2098-2109. info:/

Lord CG, Lepper MR, & Preston E. (1984) Considering the opposite: a corrective strategy for social judgment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 47(6), 1231-43. PMID: 6527215  

  • February 13, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 297 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: The “bad is black” effect 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

It is hard to believe that more than two decades have passed since the controversial Time magazine cover featuring OJ Simpson with his skin intentionally darkened was distributed. It was published in 1994 and people were so upset that the magazine’s managing editor issued a public apology for publishing the cover photo. Today, we are […]... Read more »

Alter, A., Stern, C., Granot, Y., & Balcetis, E. (2016) The “Bad Is Black” Effect. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 42(12), 1653-1665. DOI: 10.1177/0146167216669123  

  • February 6, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 342 views

Accepting the morally outrageous: Is this our new normal? 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Some interesting research is described in plain language over at the Vox website by Joshua Knobe (an academic from Yale). The article highlights a question we’ve been wondering about that may be important for all of us to consider over the next four years as we plan strategies for litigation. The question is this: Just […]... Read more »

Thomas F. Icard, Jonathan F. Kominsky, & Joshua Knobe. (2017) NORMALITY AND ACTUAL CAUSAL STRENGTH. Cognition. info:/

  • February 1, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 630 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: A psychology vaccine for climate  change disinformation

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Disinformation is everywhere you turn these days, so we need good tools to debunk those “alternative facts”. Last year we wrote about a strategy to combat distrust of science by using the concept of the “gateway belief”. While that paper received criticism from a well-known law professor, over at the Cultural Cognition blog, the same […]... Read more »

van der Linden, S., Leiserowitz, A., Rosenthal, S., & Maibach, E. (2017) Inoculating the Public against Misinformation about Climate Change. Global Challenges, 1600008. DOI: 10.1002/gch2.201600008  

  • January 30, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 619 views

When you have steady eye contact, it’s hard to think (even with  friends)!

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

In 2015, we wrote a one of our combination (“tidbit”) posts that included a bit of information on how extended eye contact can cause hallucinations. As it turns out, it also makes it hard to think (which seems reasonable if you are having hallucinations). The researchers we are covering today say that maintaining eye contact […]... Read more »

  • January 29, 2017
  • 10:05 AM
  • 641 views

Want a Deep Understanding? First, Know How Little You Know

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

It’s natural to feel we have a deep understanding of the world. Unfortunately, we most often don’t. On the whole, we tend to think we understand how things work in much more detail than we actually do. Scientists continue to show us just how complex the world really is. And the devices we build are […]
Check out Want a Deep Understanding? First, Know How Little You Know, an original post on Thinker Academy.
... Read more »

  • January 27, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 614 views

Swearing makes you seem more honest 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

But we still don’t recommend it in polite company (aka, the courtroom)! An international team of researchers (from the Netherlands, Hong Kong, the United States and the United Kingdom) have just published an article examining two perspectives on profanity and honesty. The researchers say that, on one hand, profanity is considered a violation of social […]... Read more »

Feldman, G., Lian, H., Kosinski, M., & Stillwell, D. (2017) Frankly, We Do Give a Damn: The relationship between profanity and honesty. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1177/1948550616681055  

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