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  • July 26, 2015
  • 11:18 AM
  • 615 views

Stop Wasting Time Abroad: How to Ensure Contact with New Cultures Boosts Your Creativity

by Louise Rasmussen in Global Cognition

Yuck! Splashes of chicken blood and insects fly everywhere. The old Chinese woman waves the butcher knife and squirming corpse triumphantly. She flashes a toothless grin. You’re speechless. Flabbergasted. Grossed out big time. You thought you’d take a leisurely stroll in a quaint out-door market. You expected to see some strange veggies. Marvel at oddly […]
Check out Stop Wasting Time Abroad: How to Ensure Contact with New Cultures Boosts Your Creativity, an original post on Global Cog........ Read more »

  • July 23, 2015
  • 07:54 AM
  • 703 views

Choice Architecture: Even in “Heads or Tails,” It Matters What’s Presented First

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

If you’re familiar with behavioural economics, then the results of this study will be right up your alley. The researchers set out to determine whether there was a “first-toss Heads bias.” Meaning, when flipping a coin and the choices are presented “Heads or … Continue reading →... Read more »

Bar-Hillel M, Peer E, & Acquisti A. (2014) "Heads or tails?"--a reachability bias in binary choice. Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition, 40(6), 1656-63. PMID: 24773285  

  • July 20, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 807 views

“I am so tired of people mistaking me for a model!” [#humblebrag]

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Oh the “humblebrag”. It’s really not that long since career counselors were suggesting interview questions asking about weaknesses could be turned to the candidate’s advantage by responding about an alleged weakness that was really a strength. (“Weakness? I think I tend to be perfectionistic. I just can’t send in a report without double-checking it for […]

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I bought a house that is simply too  big and now I have to hire a cleaning service… 
The Sensitivity t........ Read more »

  • July 15, 2015
  • 04:09 AM
  • 849 views

Can Tetris Reduce Intrusive Memories of a Trauma Film?

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

For some inexplicable reason, you watched the torture gore horror film Hostel over the weekend. On Monday, you're having trouble concentrating at work. Images of severed limbs and bludgeoned heads keep intruding on your attempts to code or write a paper. So you decide to read about the making of Hostel.You end up seeing pictures of the most horrifying scenes from the movie. It's all way too way much to simply shake off so then you decide to play Tetris. But a funny thing happens. The unwelcome i........ Read more »

  • July 10, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 623 views

Can you identify racist jurors by asking if they watch local  TV news?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

So here’s a voir dire fantasy: When race is salient to your case, strike for cause all potential jurors who say they watch their local television news. For what cause? Because they’re more likely to be racist—at least according to today’s research. Local news coverage tends to focus on crime according to the researchers and […]

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HDTV Jurors: What do you watch on TV?
How can I convince them this wasn’t racist? Just keep talking…
Non-citizen? Undocumented? Wa........ Read more »

Arendt, F, & Northup, T. (2015) Effects of long-term exposure to news stereotypes on implicit and explicit attitudes. International Journal of Communication,, 732-751. info:/

  • July 8, 2015
  • 02:52 PM
  • 835 views

Group discussion (think juror deliberation) improves lie  detection

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Want to see a lively argument? Ask a couple of legal professionals if jurors can detect deception in witnesses or parties— and then slowly back away. It’s a hotly debated topic with some saying “jurors usually get it right” and others pointing to reams of research saying no one is a very good lie detector. […]

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Deception Detection: The latest on what we know
“Almost perfect lie/truth detection”: Incentives to lie
Lie with impunity and without detection


... Read more »

Klein N, & Epley N. (2015) Group discussion improves lie detection. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [PNAS], 112(24), 7460-5. PMID: 26015581  

  • July 7, 2015
  • 03:50 PM
  • 1,033 views

The powerful influence of placebos on the brain

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

The term placebo effect describes an improvement in the condition of a patient after being given a placebo--an inert substance (e.g. sugar pill) the patient expects may hold some benefit for him. The placebo effect has long been recognized as an unavoidable aspect of medical treatment. Physicians before the 1950s often took advantage of this knowledge by giving patients treatments like bread pills or injections of water with the understanding that patients had a tendency to feel better when they........ Read more »

  • July 6, 2015
  • 10:00 AM
  • 749 views

Brain Activity of Passengers on Terrifying Flight Sheds Light on Trauma Memory

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Neuroimaging data collected from a group of passengers who thought they were going to die when their plane ran out of fuel over the Atlantic Ocean in the summer of […]... Read more »

  • July 6, 2015
  • 08:08 AM
  • 488 views

Saving For Retirement — As Simple As Counting in Days

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

A few years ago, I wrote a post about the problems with saying “I’ll be ready in 5 minutes.” It turns out, there’s now research that — in a way — supports the point I was trying to make. In this … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 3, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 745 views

Trustworthiness, real adulthood, cat videos and how open you are to experiences 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Here’s another installment of things we think you might want to know but to which we don’t wish to devote an entire blog post. Keep reading to have tidbits worthy of sound bytes over drinks. The onset of ‘real’ adulthood Five years ago we were distressed to discover that middle age begins at 35 and […]

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There is a “naive faith in the trustworthiness of brain imaging data”
“I’ve got proof I’m open-minded!”: Inventing racist roads not taken
Your online av........ Read more »

  • July 1, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 655 views

The Bias Blind Spot Scale 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve written about the bias blind spot here before and now there is an actual scale to measure your specific bias blind spot (since, as it turns out, we all have one or more). You may wish to disagree with the statement that we all have a bias blind spot. That is precisely why it’s […]

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The Islamophobia Scale: Measuring our fear of Muslims
Outsmarting your biases & helping jurors outsmart theirs too
Pretrial publicity & bias: Take a look at the age of your j........ Read more »

Scopelliti, I., Morewedge, C., McCormick, E., Min, H., Lebrecht, S., & Kassam, K. (2015) Bias Blind Spot: Structure, Measurement, and Consequences. Management Science, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1287/mnsc.2014.2096  

  • June 25, 2015
  • 12:43 PM
  • 1,692 views

The Long Shadow of Nazi Indoctrination: Persistence of Anti-Semitism in Germany

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Voigtländer and Voth examined the results of the large General Social Survey for Germany (ALLBUS) in which several thousand Germans were asked about their values and beliefs. The survey took place in 1996 and 2006, and the researchers combined the results of both surveys with a total of 5,300 participants from 264 German towns and cities. The researchers were specifically interested in anti-Semitic attitudes and focused on three survey questions specifically related to anti-Semitism. Survey........ Read more »

Voigtländer N, & Voth HJ. (2015) Nazi indoctrination and anti-Semitic beliefs in Germany. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 26080394  

  • June 22, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 804 views

First world relationship termination problems: Facebook  “creeping” your ex

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

You’ve likely run across the statistics on Facebook being the cause of many divorces or relationship failures as unhappy individuals reunite with past loves lost. There is also of course, often heartbreak as online loves turn out to be not quite who you thought. Now Facebook is also implicated in prolonging the unhappiness after a […]

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Facebook Graph Searches: What Can You Discover?
Facebook as a conduit for misinformation and racism
Is there a relationship between age a........ Read more »

  • June 13, 2015
  • 10:30 AM
  • 919 views

In Praise of (the Right Kind of) Praise

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

Sure, you praise your kids. And they look at you with beaming little faces. Such a warm feeling, if only for a moment. But, is that all there is to praise? What’s simmering in the brain behind those sparkling eyes? It may well depend on the precise nature of the praise you gave. There are […]
Check out In Praise of (the Right Kind of) Praise, an original post on Thinker Academy.
... Read more »

  • June 10, 2015
  • 02:54 PM
  • 823 views

How Did Humans Learn to Count? Baboons May Offer Clues

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Learning to count comes early in life for humans. Most kids know how to count before they enter formal schooling and the ability to understand basic quantities is fundamental to […]... Read more »

Cantlon, J., Piantadosi, S., Ferrigno, S., Hughes, K., & Barnard, A. (2015) The Origins of Counting Algorithms. Psychological Science, 26(6), 853-865. DOI: 10.1177/0956797615572907  

  • June 5, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 823 views

The Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT) Scale

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We just posted on reflective versus non-reflective thinkers and this is the scale with which researchers identified who was reflective (initial intuition tempered by analysis) and who was not reflective (unquestioning reliance on intuition). And this is the three-item scale they used to group participants. Yes. That is not a typo. Three questions. You will […]

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The Dirty Dozen Scale 
The Disgust Scale: How have we missed this all this time?
“Electronic records don........ Read more »

Frederick, S. (2005) Cognitive Reflection and Decision Making. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 19(4), 25-42. DOI: 10.1257/089533005775196732  

  • June 3, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 786 views

Black kids are troublemakers but White kids behave badly sometimes

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We know that Black and White students are treated differently (this author cites correlational studies across thousands of schools in the US showing this disparity) but this study shows us that you don’t have to physically see race to dispense differential treatment. Just believing race is probably present is enough. The concept in question is […]

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Even kids don’t make passes at kids wearing glasses
Black victims of violent crimes aren’t treated any better by the syst........ Read more »

Okonofua JA, & Eberhardt JL. (2015) Two strikes: race and the disciplining of young students. Psychological Science, 26(5), 617-24. PMID: 25854276  

  • June 3, 2015
  • 04:31 AM
  • 967 views

Do music and language share brain resources?

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

When you listen to some music and when you read a book, does your brain use the same resources? This question goes to the heart of how the brain is organised – does it make a difference between cognitive domains like music and language? In a new commentary I highlight a successfull approach which helps […]... Read more »

Kunert, R., & Slevc, L.R. (2015) A commentary on “Neural overlap in processing music and speech” (Peretz et al., 2015) . Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. info:/doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2015.00330

Peretz I, Vuvan D, Lagrois MÉ, & Armony JL. (2015) Neural overlap in processing music and speech. Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences, 370(1664), 20140090. PMID: 25646513  

  • May 25, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 993 views

I want to believe some psychopaths have feelings 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Most of us find the behavior of the true psychopath frightening enough that we have few issues with locking them up and throwing away the key. They seem so very different from us and hearing the facts of their behavior is frightening and leaves us feeling unsafe. If you are not afraid of the psychopath, […]

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 Psychopaths cannot understand punishment—what does that mean for the courtroom?
Judges are biased in favor of psychopaths whose “brains made them do it”
Is thi........ Read more »

  • May 22, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 911 views

The Dirty Dozen Scale 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

This is not a scale to help you determine if your fruits and vegetables are dirty. This is for a different kind of dirt commonly referred to as the dark triad. Psychopathy, narcissism and Machiavellianism make up the dark triad of personality traits and they are traits we all want to identify at different points […]

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The CAST Scale: A comprehensive assessment of sadistic tendencies
The Libertarian Orientation Scale: Who’s the (real) Libertarian?
I’ll show you who&#........ Read more »

Jonason PK, & Webster GD. (2010) The dirty dozen: a concise measure of the dark triad. Psychological Assessment, 22(2), 420-32. PMID: 20528068  

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