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  • September 9, 2014
  • 09:49 PM
  • 785 views

Prejudice in the brain

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

Despite the great strides that have been made toward a more egalitarian society in the United States over the past 50 years, events like what occurred in Ferguson last month are a bleak reminder of the racial tensions that still exist here. Of course, the United States is not alone in this respect; throughout the world we can see abundant examples of strain between different races, as well as between any groups with dissimilar characteristics. In fact, it seems that the quickness with which we f........ Read more »

  • September 9, 2014
  • 12:53 AM
  • 1,021 views

The “A,B,Cs” of Interests and How You [Lawyers] Can Know Them

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

You [lawyers] have interests.  Interests provide us potent motivation for goal-oriented behavior.  We should not ignore them because interests, a very important individual difference trait variable, “are powerful predictors of educational and career choice, performance, and success”.  A recent review of psychological science literature by leading scholars provides a concise summary of current knowledge [...]
The post The “A,B,Cs” of Interests and How You [Lawyers] Can Know The........ Read more »

Rounds, J., & Su, R. (2014) The Nature and Power of Interests. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23(2), 98-103. DOI: 10.1177/0963721414522812  

  • September 8, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,209 views

I’ll Wager That You Bet On Football, Or Maybe Football

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Betting on American football and football proper is a trillion dollar a year industry. Why do only 4% of gamblers become addicted. Some of it is actually due to the games themselves. New research is showing that a belief in your knowledge of the game and the “near miss” wherein you almost win your bet, are strong factors in dopamine signaling in the reward centers of the brain.... Read more »

Anselme P, & Robinson MJ. (2013) What motivates gambling behavior? Insight into dopamine's role. Frontiers in behavioral neuroscience, 182. PMID: 24348355  

Huberfeld R, Gersner R, Rosenberg O, Kotler M, & Dannon PN. (2013) Football gambling three arm-controlled study: gamblers, amateurs and laypersons. Psychopathology, 46(1), 28-33. PMID: 22890307  

Khazaal Y, Chatton A, Billieux J, Bizzini L, Monney G, Fresard E, Thorens G, Bondolfi G, El-Guebaly N, Zullino D.... (2012) Effects of expertise on football betting. Substance abuse treatment, prevention, and policy, 18. PMID: 22578101  

Zhou K, Tang H, Sun Y, Huang GH, Rao LL, Liang ZY, & Li S. (2012) Belief in luck or in skill: which locks people into gambling?. Journal of gambling studies / co-sponsored by the National Council on Problem Gambling and Institute for the Study of Gambling and Commercial Gaming, 28(3), 379-91. PMID: 21894576  

Grötsch P, Lange C, Wiesbeck GA, & Lang U. (2013) Pathological Gambling Induced by Dopamine Antagonists: A Case Report. Journal of gambling studies / co-sponsored by the National Council on Problem Gambling and Institute for the Study of Gambling and Commercial Gaming. PMID: 24356928  

  • September 8, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 866 views

Does Face-to-Face Interaction Promote Honesty?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

I listen to a lot of audiobooks while traveling. But sometimes I want something less lengthy than a full book and so I turn to podcasts. Recently, I was on a plane and turned on an episode of the NPR TED Radio Hour podcast on Why We Lie. It’s an interesting and wide-ranging look at […]

Related posts:
Never trust a man with a wide face
I can tell from your face that you are suicidal
A law firm’s financial success & the managing partners’ face


... Read more »

  • September 5, 2014
  • 12:34 AM
  • 1,114 views

Brief Mindfulness Meditation Primer for Lawyers

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Can lawyers learn about its distinct components, and practice a process which involves interrelated components of attention regulation, body awareness, emotion regulation, and change in perspective on the self, and reach higher levels of self-compassion and well-being?  Stated another way, the question asks  “Can lawyers learn and practice mindfulness meditation?”  The short answer is [...]
The post Brief Mindfulness Meditation Primer for Lawyers appeared first on Psycholawlogy.
... Read more »

  • September 2, 2014
  • 05:39 PM
  • 1,076 views

Supernatural believers see minds at work behind random patterns

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

“Theory of Mind” is the term used to describe the mental ability to put yourself inside the mind of someone else – to imagine what it is that they are thinking. Recently, there’s been some evidence that people who do not have a strong theory of mind are more likely to be atheists. For example, [Read More...]

... Read more »

  • September 1, 2014
  • 09:24 PM
  • 904 views

The neuroscience of self-control

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

In the 1960s, a psychologist at Stanford named Walter Mischel began a series of experiments exploring the dynamics of self-control in children. In one such experiment, Mischel gave preschoolers the choice between two outcomes, one of which was clearly preferable. For example, they were able to choose between 2 marshmallows and 1 marshmallow (the experiments became known as the Stanford marshmallow experiments for this reason).But there was a catch. The experimenter would tell the children that h........ Read more »

Inzlicht, M., Legault, L., & Teper, R. (2014) Exploring the Mechanisms of Self-Control Improvement. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23(4), 302-307. DOI: 10.1177/0963721414534256  

  • August 27, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,166 views

Just how diverse is this group, really?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We often make assumptions when discussing diversity that we all perceive a group’s diversity in the same way. Today’s research shows that simply isn’t so. That is, you and I (depending on our racial in-group) can look at the same group and you might say it is diverse while I say it is not. What […]

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Religion, ethnicity and Asian-American’s voting patterns
Proof we don’t hire the most qualified candid........ Read more »

  • August 25, 2014
  • 02:39 AM
  • 979 views

Autobiographical Memory for a Life-Threatening Airline Disaster

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

“My attention shifts to the fact that the comforting engine hum is eerily gone. Where has the comforting hum of the engines gone. Something has gone very, very wrong, the plane continued to shake.” -Daniel Goncalves, recalling the terror of Air Transat Flight 236I'm sitting here in an airport, reading a harrowing first person account of Air Transat Flight 236, which fell out of the sky when it lost all power on Aug. 24, 2001.The plane was bound from Toronto, Ontario to Lisbon, Portugal........ Read more »

  • August 22, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,134 views

RIP Demographics? Well, probably not…

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve just published a new article in The Jury Expert that “should” signal the death of the simplistic use of demographics in voir dire and jury selection. Will it? Not likely. Partly this is the fault of courts that are becoming increasingly restrictive of time and the scope of questions posed to jurors. If litigants cannot ask substantive […]

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What’s a m........ Read more »

Douglas L. Keene, & Rita R. Handrich. (2014) Demographic Roulette: What Was Once a Bad Idea Has Gotten Worse. The Jury Expert, 26(3.). info:/

  • August 20, 2014
  • 11:23 AM
  • 924 views

What is Competence and Why Should I Care?

by Winston Sieck in Global Cognition

If you’ve been reading about any of the new adventures in education, such as project-based learning, you’ve surely noticed the word competence sprinkled throughout. You may have thought, “Why do I keep hearing about competence? It sounds like another fad in my kid’s education. Wish they’d focus on getting test scores up.” In fact, competence […]... Read more »

McClelland, D. C. (1973) Testing for competence rather than for "intelligence.". American psychologist, 28(1), 1-14. info:/

  • August 20, 2014
  • 11:23 AM
  • 68 views

What is Competence and Why is it Important?

by Winston Sieck in Global Cognition

If you’ve been reading about any of the new adventures in education, such as project-based learning, you’ve surely noticed the word competence sprinkled throughout. You may have thought, “Why do I keep hearing about competence? It sounds like another fad in my kid’s education. Wish they’d focus on getting test scores up.” In fact, competence […]
Check out What is Competence and Why is it Important?, an original post on Global Cognition.
... Read more »

McClelland, D. C. (1973) Testing for competence rather than for "intelligence.". American psychologist, 28(1), 1-14. info:/

  • August 18, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 644 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: When videos are too persuasive…

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It’s hard to know why research that is a almost a decade old is seen as fodder for a recent Op-Ed in the New York Times, but so it goes. Jennifer Mnookin, a law professor at UCLA, certainly has an impressive resumé, and it is likely most readers of the NYT are not familiar with […]

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Simple Jury Persuasion: When a Picture Can Sink Your Case
Simple Jury Persuasion: Being “right” versus being persuasive
Simple Jury Persuasion: Make Your Expert Optimally Persuasive


... Read more »

  • August 15, 2014
  • 06:49 PM
  • 1,012 views

A non-invasive system to replace EEG/EMG recording of sleep

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researchers highlight a new system that is ideal for high-throughput (large numbers of animals) studies for recording sleep. A game changer for sure. ... Read more »

  • August 15, 2014
  • 04:46 PM
  • 833 views

Global similarity signals of recognition strength

by Emilie Reas in Emilie Reas - Remember

The below article was recently rejected from the Journal of Neuroscience as a ‘Journal Club’ commentary on Davis et al., 2014, ‘Medial temporal lobe global similarity signals underlie recognition strength’. Hoping that my efforts will not go to waste, I’d like to give the piece an alternate home here. Please read, comment and share, all […]... Read more »

Davis T, Xue G, Love BC, Preston AR, & Poldrack RA. (2014) Global neural pattern similarity as a common basis for categorization and recognition memory. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 34(22), 7472-84. PMID: 24872552  

  • August 15, 2014
  • 03:20 PM
  • 1,944 views

In Defense of Eating Junk Food in Eating Disorder Treatment

by Shirley in Science of Eating Disorders


Should eating disorder patients be introduced to “junk food” or “hyper-palatable” foods during treatment? A few days ago, I stumbled across a blog post where Dr. Julie O’Toole, Founder and Director of the Kartini Clinic for Disordered Eating, argues against introducing “junk food” during ED treatment. The crux of the argument is that “hyperpalatable foods”—e.g., chips and Cheetos—are not real food and should never be forced or encouraged for anyone, regard........ Read more »

  • August 15, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 847 views

Did you hear the one about older adults being targeted for fraud?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Of course you did. But you may want to take a look at this study because, maybe, it isn’t true after all. It certainly is a well-known myth if it is not true. This appears to be one of those situations where we add up what we know and then come up with a conclusion […]

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When it comes to corporate fraud in America, men are almost always to blame
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Birthers, deathers, and did you hear about Jimmy Hoffa?


... Read more »

Ross, M, Grossman, I, & Schryer, E. (2014) Contrary to psychological and popular opinion, there is no compelling evidence that older adults are disproportionately victimized by consumer fraud. . Perspectives on Psychological Science. info:/

  • August 12, 2014
  • 08:12 PM
  • 858 views

3 Ways to Improve Your Cultural Intelligence

by Louise Rasmussen in Global Cognition

Picture this – you’re introduced to the CEO of a French start-up that your company is in the process of acquiring. The CEO grabs your hand and leans in for some repeated lip action on your cheeks. His breath has a hint of garlic and something else you can’t identify. His grip on your hand […]
This article, 3 Ways to Improve Your Cultural Intelligence, first appeared on Global Cognition.
... Read more »

Earley PC, & Mosakowski E. (2004) Cultural intelligence. Harvard business review, 82(10), 139-146. PMID: 15559582  

  • August 12, 2014
  • 07:31 AM
  • 878 views

Work Context and [Lawyer] Procrastination: Psychological Processes and Factors Which Influence Self-Regulation Failure

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Lawyer work context:  Lawyers procrastinate. Lawyers have heavy workloads. This means that they have a large quantity of tasks to perform.  And, lawyers’ workloads require them to regularly engage their brains in highly complex work.  Also, this requires that engage themselves in high mental activation in order to complete their work. Lawyers fail to [...]
The post Work Context and [Lawyer] Procrastination: Psychological Processes and Factors Which Influence Self-Regulation Failure appeared........ Read more »

DeArmond, S., Matthews, R., & Bunk, J. (2014) Workload and procrastination: The roles of psychological detachment and fatigue. International Journal of Stress Management, 21(2), 137-161. DOI: 10.1037/a0034893  

  • August 11, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,633 views

OCD Linked With Broad Impairments in Executive Function

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), characterized by intrusive and persistent thoughts that are often accompanied by repetitive or ritualized acts, is a serious clinical disorder that can significantly impact a person’s ability […]... Read more »

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