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  • August 22, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,096 views

RIP Demographics? Well, probably not…

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve just published a new article in The Jury Expert that “should” signal the death of the simplistic use of demographics in voir dire and jury selection. Will it? Not likely. Partly this is the fault of courts that are becoming increasingly restrictive of time and the scope of questions posed to jurors. If litigants cannot ask substantive […]

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Douglas L. Keene, & Rita R. Handrich. (2014) Demographic Roulette: What Was Once a Bad Idea Has Gotten Worse. The Jury Expert, 26(3.). info:/

  • August 20, 2014
  • 11:23 AM
  • 887 views

What is Competence and Why Should I Care?

by Winston Sieck in Global Cognition

If you’ve been reading about any of the new adventures in education, such as project-based learning, you’ve surely noticed the word competence sprinkled throughout. You may have thought, “Why do I keep hearing about competence? It sounds like another fad in my kid’s education. Wish they’d focus on getting test scores up.” In fact, competence […]... Read more »

McClelland, D. C. (1973) Testing for competence rather than for "intelligence.". American psychologist, 28(1), 1-14. info:/

  • August 20, 2014
  • 11:23 AM
  • 33 views

What is Competence and Why is it Important?

by Winston Sieck in Global Cognition

If you’ve been reading about any of the new adventures in education, such as project-based learning, you’ve surely noticed the word competence sprinkled throughout. You may have thought, “Why do I keep hearing about competence? It sounds like another fad in my kid’s education. Wish they’d focus on getting test scores up.” In fact, competence […]
Check out What is Competence and Why is it Important?, an original post on Global Cognition.
... Read more »

McClelland, D. C. (1973) Testing for competence rather than for "intelligence.". American psychologist, 28(1), 1-14. info:/

  • August 18, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 617 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: When videos are too persuasive…

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It’s hard to know why research that is a almost a decade old is seen as fodder for a recent Op-Ed in the New York Times, but so it goes. Jennifer Mnookin, a law professor at UCLA, certainly has an impressive resumé, and it is likely most readers of the NYT are not familiar with […]

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... Read more »

  • August 15, 2014
  • 06:49 PM
  • 989 views

A non-invasive system to replace EEG/EMG recording of sleep

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researchers highlight a new system that is ideal for high-throughput (large numbers of animals) studies for recording sleep. A game changer for sure. ... Read more »

  • August 15, 2014
  • 04:46 PM
  • 805 views

Global similarity signals of recognition strength

by Emilie Reas in Emilie Reas - Remember

The below article was recently rejected from the Journal of Neuroscience as a ‘Journal Club’ commentary on Davis et al., 2014, ‘Medial temporal lobe global similarity signals underlie recognition strength’. Hoping that my efforts will not go to waste, I’d like to give the piece an alternate home here. Please read, comment and share, all […]... Read more »

Davis T, Xue G, Love BC, Preston AR, & Poldrack RA. (2014) Global neural pattern similarity as a common basis for categorization and recognition memory. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 34(22), 7472-84. PMID: 24872552  

  • August 15, 2014
  • 03:20 PM
  • 1,886 views

In Defense of Eating Junk Food in Eating Disorder Treatment

by Shirley in Science of Eating Disorders


Should eating disorder patients be introduced to “junk food” or “hyper-palatable” foods during treatment? A few days ago, I stumbled across a blog post where Dr. Julie O’Toole, Founder and Director of the Kartini Clinic for Disordered Eating, argues against introducing “junk food” during ED treatment. The crux of the argument is that “hyperpalatable foods”—e.g., chips and Cheetos—are not real food and should never be forced or encouraged for anyone, regard........ Read more »

  • August 15, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 812 views

Did you hear the one about older adults being targeted for fraud?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Of course you did. But you may want to take a look at this study because, maybe, it isn’t true after all. It certainly is a well-known myth if it is not true. This appears to be one of those situations where we add up what we know and then come up with a conclusion […]

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... Read more »

Ross, M, Grossman, I, & Schryer, E. (2014) Contrary to psychological and popular opinion, there is no compelling evidence that older adults are disproportionately victimized by consumer fraud. . Perspectives on Psychological Science. info:/

  • August 12, 2014
  • 08:12 PM
  • 838 views

3 Ways to Improve Your Cultural Intelligence

by Louise Rasmussen in Global Cognition

Picture this – you’re introduced to the CEO of a French start-up that your company is in the process of acquiring. The CEO grabs your hand and leans in for some repeated lip action on your cheeks. His breath has a hint of garlic and something else you can’t identify. His grip on your hand […]
This article, 3 Ways to Improve Your Cultural Intelligence, first appeared on Global Cognition.
... Read more »

Earley PC, & Mosakowski E. (2004) Cultural intelligence. Harvard business review, 82(10), 139-146. PMID: 15559582  

  • August 12, 2014
  • 07:31 AM
  • 843 views

Work Context and [Lawyer] Procrastination: Psychological Processes and Factors Which Influence Self-Regulation Failure

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Lawyer work context:  Lawyers procrastinate. Lawyers have heavy workloads. This means that they have a large quantity of tasks to perform.  And, lawyers’ workloads require them to regularly engage their brains in highly complex work.  Also, this requires that engage themselves in high mental activation in order to complete their work. Lawyers fail to [...]
The post Work Context and [Lawyer] Procrastination: Psychological Processes and Factors Which Influence Self-Regulation Failure appeared........ Read more »

DeArmond, S., Matthews, R., & Bunk, J. (2014) Workload and procrastination: The roles of psychological detachment and fatigue. International Journal of Stress Management, 21(2), 137-161. DOI: 10.1037/a0034893  

  • August 11, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,589 views

OCD Linked With Broad Impairments in Executive Function

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), characterized by intrusive and persistent thoughts that are often accompanied by repetitive or ritualized acts, is a serious clinical disorder that can significantly impact a person’s ability […]... Read more »

  • August 11, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,199 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: When your Muslim female client wears a head-covering

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We’ve written a number of times about bias against Muslims. But here’s a nice article with an easy to incorporate finding on how to reduce bias against your female client who wears a Muslim head-covering. (In case you have forgotten, we’ve already written about head-coverings for the Muslim man.) The graphic illustrating this post shows […]

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  • August 8, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 768 views

Do you believe there are Angels and Demons among us?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

The American Bar Association is seeking nominations until August 8, 2014 [THAT's TODAY!] to help it decide on the Top 100 law blogs (“Blawgs”). We have been in the ABA Top 100 for the past 4 years and would like to make it 5! If you like this blog, please nominate us (it’s fast and free) […]

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... Read more »

  • August 7, 2014
  • 01:27 PM
  • 257 views

Bells, smells, and the ageing mind

by Michael Ramscar in The Importance of Being Wrong

Why bad science is as much of a threat to the elderly as age itself The bells A couple of years ago, I moved from California to a small town Southern Germany. Determined to experience the ancient wonders of my new hometown to the fullest, I spent my first two months living in a cupboard-sized hotel […]... Read more »

  • August 6, 2014
  • 12:03 AM
  • 813 views

Galen may have been (partly) right.

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Research in California has re-opened the ancient medical texts by identifying factors in the blood of young adult mice that may slow the rate of neurodegeneration in aged mice. Even Steven Colbert digs it. ... Read more »

Villeda, S., Plambeck, K., Middeldorp, J., Castellano, J., Mosher, K., Luo, J., Smith, L., Bieri, G., Lin, K., Berdnik, D.... (2014) Young blood reverses age-related impairments in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity in mice. Nature Medicine, 20(6), 659-663. DOI: 10.1038/nm.3569  

  • July 31, 2014
  • 08:10 AM
  • 1,568 views

Tough Talking Apes

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

The new Planet of the Apes movie has talking apes! In the old Charleton Heston versions, the apes had thousands of years to evolve speech capabilities, but Dawn of the Planet of the Apes takes place only 10 years after their escape from the lab. Anatomical differences between human and ape hyoid position, rib musculature and tongue show us why speech is not possible for Cesar and his friends. In addition, new research points out the importance of the foxp2 protein for speech and auditory functio........ Read more »

  • July 25, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 792 views

Teaching people about neuroscience can make them softer on crime!

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

The American Bar Association is seeking nominations until August 8, 2014 to help it decide on the Top 100 law blogs (“Blawgs”). We have been in the ABA Top 100 for the past 4 years and would like to make it 5! If you like this blog, please nominate us (it’s fast and free) here. […]

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... Read more »

Shariff AF, Greene JD, Karremans JC, Luguri JB, Clark CJ, Schooler JW, Baumeister RF, & Vohs KD. (2014) Free Will and Punishment: A Mechanistic View of Human Nature Reduces Retribution. Psychological science. PMID: 24916083  

  • July 18, 2014
  • 05:03 AM
  • 1,271 views

Blue Eyes Mean Lies?

by Chiara Civardi in United Academics

A recent study by Karel Kleisner et al. (2013) shows eye colour and facial features have an influence on our perception of trustworthiness.... Read more »

Kleisner K, Priplatova L, Frost P, & Flegr J. (2013) Trustworthy-looking face meets brown eyes. PloS one, 8(1). PMID: 23326406  

  • July 10, 2014
  • 12:18 PM
  • 1,236 views

Learning for Survival? Venom Overrides Other Snake Categories

by amikulak in Daily Observations

We deal with the world around us by putting it into categories. We are constantly trying to understand the things we encounter by classifying them: Is this a food I […]... Read more »

  • July 8, 2014
  • 09:38 AM
  • 1,471 views

Sleep May Help the Brain Integrate New Language Skills

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Scientists have understood for decades that the brain is “plastic,” meaning that our neural connections change and adapt in response to new experiences. One factor that seems to play a […]... Read more »

Gaskell, M., Warker, J., Lindsay, S., Frost, R., Guest, J., Snowdon, R., & Stackhouse, A. (2014) Sleep Underpins the Plasticity of Language Production. Psychological Science. DOI: 10.1177/0956797614535937  

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