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All posts; Tags Include "Cosmology and Extragalactic Astrophysics"

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  • April 23, 2015
  • 10:35 AM
  • 1,416 views

of microwave noodles and extragalactic signals

by Greg Fish in weird things

FRBs just can’t seem to catch a break this month. First, they were an alien signal. Then just as quickly as they were attributed to aliens because the Daily Fail decided to get creative with two out of context words and no one seemed to bother to fact check them, the bursts were called a false signal caused by microwave interference. Not just any microwave interference mind you, but the kind in which you warm up leftovers [...]... Read more »

E. Petroff, E. F. Keane, E. D. Barr, J. E. Reynolds, J. Sarkissian, P. G. Edwards, J. Stevens, C. Brem, A. Jameson, S. Burke-Spolaor.... (2015) Identifying the source of perytons at the Parkes radio telescope. n/a. arXiv: 1504.02165v1

  • April 22, 2015
  • 08:03 AM
  • 1,119 views

why the great void didn’t cause the cold spot

by Greg Fish in weird things

Remember the anomalous Cold Spot, the bizarre, low temperature area spotted in the maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation, or CMBR for short, the echo the Big Bang which gives us a very high level overview of the structure of our universe? Cosmologists bristled at an anomaly stretching some 1.8 billion light years and seemingly violating what we thought was a universal rule [...]... Read more »

Szapudi, I., Kovacs, A., Granett, B., Frei, Z., Silk, J., Burgett, W., Cole, S., Draper, P., Farrow, D., Kaiser, N.... (2015) Detection of a supervoid aligned with the cold spot of the cosmic microwave background. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 450(1), 288-294. DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stv488  

  • April 21, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 973 views

peeking at dark matter during a tidal strip show

by Greg Fish in weird things

Dark matter is a substance that makes up nearly all mass in the universe, but decades after we discovered it, all we have are indirect measurements which show us that it’s there in very large amounts, forming galactic halos, but ultimately, little else. It doesn’t seem to interact with any of the stuff that makes stars, dust, and planets, it emits or reflects no radiation, and this utter lack of interesting properties we could study [...]... Read more »

Massey, R., Williams, L., Smit, R., Swinbank, M., Kitching, T., Harvey, D., Jauzac, M., Israel, H., Clowe, D., Edge, A.... (2015) The behaviour of dark matter associated with four bright cluster galaxies in the 10 kpc core of Abell 3827. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 449(4), 3393-3406. DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stv467  

  • December 4, 2014
  • 02:21 PM
  • 1,428 views

ALMA Japan: Hi-Def Imaging of Spiral Gas Arms from Twin Baby Stars (w/video)

by DJ Busby in Astronasty

We know that about half the the stars out there (with sizes close to that of our sun) are binary systems. However, for a long time we've been lacking information on how they develop, since it's not been easy to get a whole lot of data from surrounding scattered mass that's so damned far away! Congrats to all involved!... Read more »

Shigehisa Takakuwa, Masao Saito, Kazuya Saigo, Tomoaki Matsumoto, Jeremy Lim, Tomoyuki Hanawa, & Paul T. P. Ho. (2014) Angular Momentum Exchange by Gravitational Torques and Infall in the Circumbinary Disk of the Protostellar System L1551 NE. The Astrophysical Journal. arXiv: 1409.4903v1

  • April 13, 2014
  • 01:56 PM
  • 1,656 views

Intro to External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP)

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP)  is something that’s been discussed for some time. In fact, it was originally proposed by Stanislaw Ulam way back in 1947. Unfortunately the public perception of atomic technology as well as pieces of otherwise well meaning legislation have called into question the feasibility of spacecraft that operate using this advanced … Read More →... Read more »

  • February 5, 2014
  • 11:43 AM
  • 1,400 views

Solving a 30-Year-Old Problem in High Mass Star Formation

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Some 30 years ago, astronomers found that regions of ionized gas around young high mass stars remain small (under a third of a light-year) for ten times longer than they should if they were to expand as expected in simple models. Recent supercomputer simulations predicted that these regions actually flicker in brightness over this period … Read More →... Read more »

C. G. De Pree, T. Peters, M.-M. Mac Low, D. J. Wilner, W. M. Goss, R. Galván-Madrid, E. R. Keto, R. S. Klessen, & A. Monsrud. (2014) Flickering of 1.3 cm Sources in Sgr B2: Toward a Solution to the Ultracompact H II Region Lifetime Problem. The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 781(L36). DOI: 10.1088/2041-8205/781/2/L36  

  • November 5, 2013
  • 07:43 AM
  • 1,428 views

What White Dwarfs Can Tell Us About the Universe

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Researchers from Europe and the U.S. have ruled out a multitude of possible parameters for dark photons – a type of dark matter and energy – with the help of white dwarfs. In some aspects, the shining of these dying stars gives more information on dark forces than is provided by earth-based laboratories. The journal … Read More →... Read more »

Herbert K. Dreiner, Jean-François Fortin, Jordi Isern, & Lorenzo Ubaldi. (2013) White Dwarfs constrain Dark Forces. Phys. Rev. D, 88(4). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.88.043517  

  • October 25, 2013
  • 11:40 AM
  • 2,160 views

What Aliens From Another World Will Look Like

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Invading aliens from outer space won’t look like a Lady Gaga zombie or creatures with serious nasal drip problems. Top planetary scientists have now come up with different sketches of how aliens might appear. Here, then, are what real aliens will most likely look like if they drop on your house. First, the alien won’t … Read More →... Read more »

Cosmovici, C., Pluchino, S., Salerno, E., Montebugnoli, S., Zoni, L., & Bartolini, M. (2007) Radio Search for Water in Exo-Planetary Systems. Extreme Solar Systems, 33. info:/

  • October 16, 2013
  • 10:45 AM
  • 1,477 views

How the Largest Known Star is Tearing Itself Apart

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

An international team of astronomers has observed part of the final death throes of the largest known star in the Universe as it throws off its outer layers. The discovery, by a collaboration of scientists from the UK, Chile, Germany and the USA, is a vital step in understanding how massive stars return enriched material … Read More →... Read more »

Nicholas J. Wright, Roger Wesson, Janet E. Drew, Geert Barentsen, Michael J. Barlow, Jeremy R. Walsh, Albert Zijlstra, Jeremy J. Drake, Jochen Eisloffel, & Hywel J. Farnhill. (2013) The Ionized Nebula surrounding the Red Supergiant W26 in Westerlund 1. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. arXiv: 1309.4086v1

  • September 26, 2013
  • 10:53 AM
  • 1,356 views

Mapping Clouds on Exoplanet Kepler-7b

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

An international team, with participation from the University of Bern, has produced the first map of clouds on an exoplanet using the Kepler Space Telescope. Studying the atmospheres of exoplanets is the path towards ultimately identifying life elsewhere in the Universe. Understanding the role of clouds in exoplanet atmospheres is a necessary ingredient in the … Read More →... Read more »

Kevin Heng, & Brice-Olivier Demory. (2013) Understanding Trends Associated with Clouds in Irradiated Exoplanets. Astrohysical Journal. arXiv: 1309.5956v1

  • June 7, 2013
  • 03:18 PM
  • 1,367 views

The Halting of the Hot Jupiter

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

We haven’t talked about exoplanets for a while, and we should ‘cause they are pretty badass. Through various podcasts and the like, I've been hearing some really cool things about NASA’s Kepler Mission and all of neat astronomical bodies it’s been finding. So I decided to browse around the NASA and JPL websites to see what new coolness has been discovered recently.NASA’s Kepler Mission was launched in 2009. It was built to detect potentially life-supporting planets around other stars........ Read more »

  • May 2, 2013
  • 09:50 AM
  • 1,505 views

Meteorites May Reveal Mars’ Secrets of Life

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

In an effort to determine if conditions were ever right on Mars to sustain life, a team of scientists, including a Michigan State University professor, has examined a meteorite that formed on the red planet more than a billion years ago. And although this team’s work is not specifically solving the mystery, it is laying … Read More →... Read more »

  • February 5, 2013
  • 03:39 PM
  • 1,140 views

The “ISW mystery” deepens considerably (II)

by Shaun Hotchkiss in The Trenches of Discovery

This time last year I wrote a few posts describing what I called the “ISW mystery”. A year has passed, it is time for an update on the mystery.

The very short summary is that things are starting to get more than a little bit exciting. All of the plausible ways in which the calculation of the expected ISW signal could have been wrong have been checked and eliminated as possibilities; if the measured signal is real, it is too large for the standard cosmological model. Much, much more exciti........ Read more »

Yan-Chuan Cai, Mark C. Neyrinck, Istvan Szapudi, Shaun Cole, & Carlos S. Frenk. (2013) A Detection of the Cold Imprint of Voids on the Microwave Background Radiation. arXiv. arXiv: 1301.6136v1

S. Ilic, M. Langer, & M. Douspis. (2013) On the detection of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect with stacked voids. arXiv. arXiv: 1301.5849v1

  • January 15, 2013
  • 04:40 PM
  • 1,317 views

did the cosmological principle get knocked down?

by Greg Fish in weird things

Since the dawn of modern cosmology there’s been an implicit assumption that no particular spot in the universe was supposed to be any more special than the rest. On the biggest scales of all, scales at which galaxies are treated like tiny particles, the universe is supposed to be isotropic and homogeneous i.e. more or less uniform in composition and its expansion from the Big Bang. [...]... Read more »

  • October 18, 2012
  • 10:42 AM
  • 1,472 views

Searching for Extraterrestrial Microbes

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Locating thermophiles in other parts of the universe could very well aid in the search for extraterrestrial life. Most people have agreed that if life is found among the stars, it will be microbial (at least in the near-term future). Many individuals have also suggested that intelligent life forms might very well be extinct in [...]... Read more »

  • September 26, 2012
  • 06:00 PM
  • 1,409 views

Supernova 1006 lived fast and left no companion behind

by Kelly Oakes in Basic Space

A supernova that lit up the skies in the year 1006 lived and died fast, leaving no companion star behind, astronomers have found. The result is the latest clue in a puzzle that has been troubling astronomers for some time – how does this type of stellar explosion happen?... Read more »

Jonay I. González Hernández, Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente, Hugo M. Tabernero, David Montes, Ramon Canal, Javier Méndez, & Luigi R. Bedin. (2012) No surviving evolved companions of the progenitor of SN 1006. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature11447  

  • September 17, 2012
  • 01:27 AM
  • 1,596 views

What Microfossils Found in Meteorites Can Tell Us

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

While most people associate the term microfossil with the strange ALH 84001 object, there are plenty of other more concrete examples of tiny fossilized organisms. Research conducted with scanning electron microscope equipment has created a wide array of scientific literature regarding these small remains of living organisms. While marine objects don’t necessary have anything to [...]... Read more »

  • September 14, 2012
  • 01:22 PM
  • 41,539 views

Where is all the lithium?

by Brooke N in Smaller Questions

According to standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, the universe should have more lithium than we have previously observed. A new method suggestions maybe the universe isn't quite as off from our theories as we thought.... Read more »

  • September 11, 2012
  • 04:13 PM
  • 1,808 views

How Genetics Shape Our Addictions

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Have you ever wondered why some people find it so much easier to stop smoking than others? New research (cited below) shows that vulnerability to smoking addiction is shaped by our genes. A study from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital – The Neuro, McGill University shows that people with genetically fast nicotine metabolism have [...]... Read more »

  • May 8, 2012
  • 01:03 PM
  • 1,530 views

Looking for Earths by Looking for Jupiters

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

In the search for Earth-like planets, it is helpful to look for clues and patterns that can help scientist narrow down the types of systems where potentially habitable planets are likely to be discovered. New research from a team including Carnegie’s Alan Boss narrows down the search for Earth-like planets near Jupiter-like planets. Their work [...]... Read more »

Steffen, J., Ragozzine, D., Fabrycky, D., Carter, J., Ford, E., Holman, M., Rowe, J., Welsh, W., Borucki, W., Boss, A.... (2012) Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1120970109  

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