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  • June 8, 2015
  • 03:14 PM

SciELO updates the guide for publication of errata and retractions

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

In late-May 2015 the SciELO Program published the updated guide for publication of erratum, retraction and expression of concern. The guide was written based on international guidelines and recommendations and it is directed to editors of journals indexed in SciELO. … Read More →... Read more »

International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). (2013) Corrections and Version Control. International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). info:/

  • May 26, 2015
  • 04:21 PM

Can monies spent globally on journal subscriptions be completely transitioned to an OA business model to free the journals?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The recent rapid growth in open access publishing, and the clear benefits that open access presents to society as a whole leads to the question: can all subscription based scientific journals in the world be transitioned to open access in a sustainable way? Is there enough money currently in the system for such a transition, and would there be any economic impact? A recent eye-opening study published by the Max Planck Digital Library delves into this issue and provides some very concrete answers........ Read more »

SCHIMMER, R., GESCHUHN, K.K., & VOGLER, A. (2015) Disrupting the subscription journals’ business model for the necessary large-scale transformation to open access. MPG. PuRe. info:/10.17617/1.3

  • May 18, 2015
  • 05:35 PM

Dealing with information overload

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Information overload is a major barrier researchers face to capture and ingest the knowledge that is being discovered and created by science. The challenge is how to develop ways to create overviews of the knowledge that has been published related to specific areas of interest. The Lazarus initiative is introduced. … Read More →... Read more »

  • May 12, 2015
  • 04:22 PM

Enhancing peer review: guides, tutorials and good practice manuals

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The validation of scientific reports before publication is an established practice, whose effectiveness and importance is recognized by authors, publishers, funding agencies and scientific societies around the world, in order to ensure the originality, quality, reliability, integrity and consistency of scholarly literature. What has long been the exclusive prerogative of publishers and editors now relies on innovative initiatives by organizations and societies dedicated to understand and improve........ Read more »

  • May 11, 2015
  • 03:23 PM

Peer review: The pleasure of publishing – originally published in the journal eLife in January/2015

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

When assessing manuscripts eLife editors look for a combination of rigour and insight, along with results and ideas that make other researchers think differently about their subject. … Read More →... Read more »

  • May 6, 2015
  • 04:59 PM

eLife: an example of improved peer review

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The online open access peer reviewed journal eLife publishes articles in biomedicine and life sciences. The nonprofit publication emerged from the ideas of its founders to create a publication model that met the needs of the academic community regarding editorial policy. The journal relies on a staff of Senior Editors made of renowned, experienced researchers, which are active in their fields. Its peer review process is innovative and aims to ensure clear assessment goals as well as constructive........ Read more »

  • April 30, 2015
  • 06:22 PM

The use of research metrics is diversified in the Leiden Manifesto

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Research evaluation in recent decades has been increasingly conducted through metrics and indicators, which are gradually replacing the assessment by peers. Researchers gathered at the 19th International Conference on Science and Technology Indicators (STI 2014) held in September 2014 in Leiden, Netherlands, in order to advise on the use of metrics in research assessment drafted a set of rules - the Leiden Manifesto. Know its guidelines. … Read More →... Read more »

Hicks Diana, Ludo Waltman, Sarah de Rijcke, & Ismael Rafols. (2015) Bibliometrics: The Leiden Manifesto for research metrics. Nature, 520(7548), 429-431. DOI:  

  • April 24, 2015
  • 05:41 PM

Peer-review as a research topic in its own right

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Over the last decade, the topic of scholarly communication has attracted the interest of researchers in all fields of knowledge. One of the most studied topics is the assessment of peer review, including its qualitative and quantitative aspects, its ability to detect and curb unethical practices, the appreciation of its methods of assessment and how technology can facilitate and improve the process, while meeting the challenges brought about by the age of digital publishing. … Read More &#........ Read more »

Nicholas David, Hamid R. Jamali, Eti Herman, Carol Tenopir, Rachel Volentine, Suzie Allard, & Kenneth Levine. (2015) Peer review: still king in the digital age. Learned Publishing, 28(1), 15-21. DOI:  

Onitilo Adedayo A., Sherry A. Salzman-Scott, Rachel V. Stankowski, & Suhail A. R. Doi. (2013) A Core-Item Reviewer Evaluation (CoRE) System for Manuscript Peer Review. Accountability in Research, 21(2), 109-121. DOI:  

  • April 17, 2015
  • 04:09 PM

Peer review: bad with it, worse without it

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Peer review is seen as one of the pillars - if not the most important - of scientific communication. Despite the difficulties in going through the review process, the authors believe that the process improves the quality of the manuscript, and they want to be published on refereed journals that have a sound evaluation mechanism. Recent cases of attempted manipulation of the peer review process by fake reviews concern the international scientific community, however, it does not undermine its cred........ Read more »

Nicholas David, Hamid R. Jamali, Eti Herman, Carol Tenopir, Rachel Volentine, Suzie Allard, & Kenneth Levine. (2015) Peer review: still king in the digital age. Learned Publishing, 28(1), 15-21. DOI:  

  • April 9, 2015
  • 12:30 PM

The Elsevier you know is not the only Elsevier

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The current science publisher Elsevier may have the same name as the venerable publishing house that published the work of great scientists in the 16th and 17th century, but there is in fact no historical connection other than the name. … Read More →... Read more »

FREDRIKSSON Einar. (2001) The Dutch Publishing Scene: Elsevier and North-Holland. IOS Press.

FREDRIKSSON, E. H. (2001) The Dutch Publishing Scene: Elsevier and North-Holland. A century of science publishing: a collection of essays. info:/

  • April 5, 2015
  • 11:11 AM

2000 Years of Atlantic Hurricanes Suggests We Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet

by Cath Jex in Tak Fur The Kaffe

The 20th century has seen relatively few and weak hurricanes compared to the last 2000 years, shows new research.... Read more »

Donnelly, J., Hawkes, A., Lane, P., MacDonald, D., Shuman, B., Toomey, M., van Hengstum, P., & Woodruff, J. (2015) Climate forcing of unprecedented intense-hurricane activity in the last 2000 years. Earth's Future, 3(2), 49-65. DOI: 10.1002/2014EF000274  

  • March 27, 2015
  • 04:21 PM

Peer review modalities, pros and cons

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The double-blind peer review system is chosen by most researchers as an effective and efficient mechanism by eliminating subjective judgment as well as authorship and affiliation biases, allowing to focus on the quality of the manuscript. Nature reports that authors can, from now on, choose this form of review for their manuscripts. Here are discussed the most common forms of peer review, its features, advantages and disadvantages, including those regarding SciELO Brazil journals. … Read M........ Read more »

  • March 20, 2015
  • 10:20 AM

Could grant proposal reviews be made available openly?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Researchers have been discussing what would be the impact of making the review process of grant proposals more open and transparent, in order to support the preparation of better proposals and acknowledge the work of the reviewers. A recently published paper in Nature examines the impact of two articles on the open availability of the review of research proposals and the possibility of changing the assessment after publication of the results. … Read More →... Read more »

  • March 13, 2015
  • 04:00 PM

Study analyzes the use of social networks in the assessment of scientific impact

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The use of social networks in science communication has been increasing on a large scale, and specific platforms have been created for interaction and information sharing among researchers. A study by researchers at the University of St. Gallen, in Switzerland evaluated whether and how scientific impact can be measured by social media data analysis, and how this approach correlates to traditional metrics. … Read More →... Read more »

HOFFMANN, C.P., LUTZ, C., & MECKEL, M. (2014) Impact Factor 2.0: Applying Social Network Analysis to Scientific Impact Assessment. 47th Hawaii International Conference on System Science, Hilton Waikoloa Village. DOI: 10.1109/HICSS.2014.202  

boyd, D., & Ellison, N. (2007) Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), 210-230. DOI: 10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00393.x  

Priem, J. (2013) Scholarship: Beyond the paper. Nature, 495(7442), 437-440. DOI: 10.1038/495437a  

  • March 11, 2015
  • 11:14 AM

Citizen science is making scientists of everyone

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Citizen science is getting a lot of attention these days, which might make you think it is a new social phenomenon. But in fact, nothing is further from the truth.... Read more »

Blackawton P. S., Airzee S. , Allen A., Baker S., Berrow A., Blair C., Churchill M., Coles J., Cumming R. F.-J., & Fraquelli L. (2011) Blackawton bees. Biology Letters, 168-172. DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2010.1056  

Silvertown Jonathan. (2009) A new dawn for citizen science. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 24(9), 467-471. DOI:  

  • February 18, 2015
  • 04:34 PM

Seals Moonlight as Scientists to Collect Vital Data from Our Oceans

by Cath Jex in Tak Fur The Kaffe

Small electronic-tags attached to seals are collecting data to improve satellite estimates of phytoplankton populations--vital for tracking harmful algal blooms and monitoring ocean health.... Read more »

Biermann, L., Guinet, C., Bester, M., Brierley, A., & Boehme, L. (2015) An alternative method for correcting fluorescence quenching. Ocean Science, 11(1), 83-91. DOI: 10.5194/os-11-83-2015  

  • October 30, 2014
  • 12:20 PM

Alcoholism as a Reward System Dysfunction

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Alcoholism and other addictive behaviors often occur together within individual patients.For example, individuals with alcoholism commonly also are smokers and meet criteria for a diagnosis of nicotine dependence.This co-occurrence suggests multiple types of addiction may share genetic and environmental risk factors. Additionally, there might be a common neurobiological mechanism in play for many addictions.Kenneth Blum and other leading alcoholism researchers recently published a review that pr........ Read more »

  • September 3, 2014
  • 09:01 AM

The Kanisza Triangle: You Can’t Believe Your Eyes

by Rebecca A. Zarate in United Academics

How does the brain decide what the larger, gestalt picture is? From this demonstration, Kok and De Lange concluded it is “an interactive process between higher-order visual areas and V1, wherein activity in V1 is modulated in a highly specific way according to the perceptual hypothesis provided by higher-order areas.” In essence, higher areas of the brain (top-down processes) are making gestalt type guesses, expectations, and assumptions that affect what your senses perceive... Read more »

  • August 28, 2014
  • 08:56 AM

Feminism Not Funny? Women In American Sitcoms

by Nura Rutten in United Academics

Compared to the beginning of the sitcom-area, in the 1950′s/1960′s, the roles of women and men sometimes seem to be reversed. However, in every sitcom, the woman who wants to be funny has only two options.... Read more »

  • August 22, 2014
  • 06:13 AM

Is Intelligence Actually Beneficial To Survival?

by Rebekah Morrow in United Academics

Research shows that more intelligent animals might not always be best suited for survival. Some researchers speculate that intelligence may be a trade-off. Fast learning may correlate with other traits, such as being less aggressive, which could weaken chances for survival. Slower learning may indicate that other choices are being made, and this variety could prove advantageous later.... Read more »

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