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  • October 16, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 560 views

The Trust in Science and Scientists Inventory Scale 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Often, social science research studies have scales (i.e., paper and pencil measures) that may have relevance to litigation advocacy. When they seem to (or when they are just bizarre) we write about them here. If you’d like to see all the scales we blogged about over time, take a look here. It ranges from the […]

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Women who trust too much: The Unmitigated Communion Scale
The Libertarian Orientation Scale: Who’s the (real) Libertarian?
70% of evangelicals do not see reli........ Read more »

  • October 14, 2015
  • 09:53 AM
  • 1,587 views

Feel Our Pain: Empathy and Moral Behavior

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

"It's empathy that makes us help other people. It's empathy that makes us moral." The economist Paul Zak casually makes this comment in his widely watched TED talk about the hormone oxytocin, which he dubs the "moral molecule". Zak quotes a number of behavioral studies to support his claim that oxytocin increases empathy and trust, which in turn increases moral behavior. If all humans regularly inhaled a few puffs of oxytocin through a nasal spray, we could become m........ Read more »

De Dreu, C., Greer, L., Van Kleef, G., Shalvi, S., & Handgraaf, M. (2011) Oxytocin promotes human ethnocentrism. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(4), 1262-1266. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1015316108  

Shalvi S, & De Dreu CK. (2014) Oxytocin promotes group-serving dishonesty. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(15), 5503-7. PMID: 24706799  

Xu X, Zuo X, Wang X, & Han S. (2009) Do you feel my pain? Racial group membership modulates empathic neural responses. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 29(26), 8525-9. PMID: 19571143  

  • October 14, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 544 views

You might want to start assessing perseverance in potential job  applicants

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

While you may not have heard the term “counterproductive work behaviors” if you are not in the habit of reading organizational behavior research, you certainly will recognize the behaviors when you see them: absenteeism, lateness, rudeness and incivility. This is an interesting study because rather than studying counter-productive work behaviors (aka “bad behavior”) they wanted […]

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Workplace rudeness: Death of a thousand cuts 
“Belief Perseverance”: Co........ Read more »

  • October 12, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 693 views

Reports of novel or contradictory health research reduces public trust  in science

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Apparently it’s all about motivated reasoning and uncertainty. When people hear new research findings that are unfamiliar or hear new findings that contradict what they already believe—they are likely to feel uncertain and confused. When you feel that way, it is unpleasant and you want to get back to feeling certain and clear about how […]

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Have reports of the death of the civil jury trial been premature?
Is there an effective strategy that reduces a conspiracy  theor........ Read more »

  • October 9, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 837 views

Police observers are more observant than ordinary  civilians

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Most research has not shown police to be any more observant than ordinary civilians—even though judges and juries often make assumptions that police witnesses are more reliable than civilian eyewitnesses. New research by Dutch researchers shows that police observers were more aware of details in a drug deal near a hotel which had been recorded […]

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Are jurors more skeptical of police on the witness stand now? 
“I can look into his eyes and just tell he is lying”
An ........ Read more »

  • October 8, 2015
  • 11:38 AM
  • 795 views

Who Are You Wearing?: Does Competition Affect How Women View Luxury?

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

What do you think of when I say “luxury consumption”? Probably something that requires a Robin Leach voice over, right? Now what if I ask you why these luxuries are so valued? Is it because they are of excellent quality? Aesthetically appealing? Highly exclusive? Next, consider the audience for the luxury – who is admiring who? And what does that luxury symbolize? Status? Wealth? Success?A recent paper in Evolutionary Psychology takes a look at these questions and has one of the best title........ Read more »

  • October 5, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 619 views

Is there an effective strategy that reduces a conspiracy  theorist’s intense beliefs?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

According to new research with a large sample from all across the United States, the answer is yes! If you have read this blog for long, you know we love a good conspiracy theorist and use their idiosyncratic associations in pretrial research to plug holes in case narratives. The researchers briefly review the past literature […]

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Conspiracy beliefs and the relation to emotional uncertainty
Would you get sucked in to conspiracy theories?
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  • September 28, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 845 views

Ten minutes of uninterrupted eye contact causes hallucinations and other important things 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

There are many things we read and discard rather than sharing them (and our take on them) with you, but other things we read and grin and think you might want to know. We’ve described these before as odd facts for sharing over drinks or dinner or around the office. It isn’t the most pivotal […]

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“Cultural competency” is important for your financial bottom line
The Donald Trump Effect:  Press coverage can determine public opinion and maybe election outcomes
Things ........ Read more »

  • September 23, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 730 views

Who has the deepest voice amongst the Republican  candidates for President?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

I watched the second Republican debate last week after reading two more articles on voice pitch and winning elections. Not coincidentally, I had to struggle to keep from focusing on who had the deepest voice among the candidates. We’ve written about this line of research before and tend to think of it as the Barry […]

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Republicans prefer ‘Republican-looking’ political candidates
Feel the power of that deep and resonant voice!
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  • September 21, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 730 views

Predicting who will murder their spouse or  family members

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

This is a fascinating study on how those that kill significant others or family members are different from those who kill strangers. The first author explains how these murderers are different, saying “These murders are usually in the heat of passion and generally involve drugs or alcohol and often are driven by jealousy or revenge […]

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Texas + Wealth + Family Lawsuits = Dysfunction?
You killed your spouse. But who is responsible?
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  • September 18, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,215 views

“Gaydar”: Real or plain and simple stereotyping? 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

A study a while back showed ‘above chance’ guessing of sexual orientation based on photographs of faces alone. The results were explained as proof of gaydar. Now, a new study says gaydar is not real and is a way to stereotype others that is seen as more “socially and personally acceptable”. They point to a […]

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The Danger of Stereotyping: Does Gay + Black = Likable?
The Libertarian Orientation Scale: Who’s the (real) Libertarian?
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  • September 14, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 613 views

Better signs equals less friction: Why you need a good graphics  person

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s a study about road safety that doesn’t know it’s a nice indication of why litigators need good graphics. We have blogged before about the value of graphics so it’s good to see more research that is so sensible to highlight the value of the visual in the courtroom. Today’s researchers wanted to see which […]

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A picture is worth a thousand words…
Surely we are not talking about the same person!
You can improve your litigation advocacy (for free!)


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  • August 31, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 563 views

Talking about climate change without  knee-jerk responses from listeners

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We recently posted new research on the secret to combatting distrust of science. Now we have more research on how to talk about climate change without setting off automatic and defensive reactions from listeners. Not many of our readers are going to be litigating climate change issues, but the challenge of discussing complex scientific issues […]

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How can I convince them this wasn’t racist? Just keep talking…
Eyewitness identification and change blindness
Are conse........ Read more »

  • August 21, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 846 views

This and that: The secret to crowdfunding success, cold offices,  and nosy smartphones

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s another collection of interesting tidbits that don’t rate an entire blog post on their own but that we think worthy of mention. Think of them as our contribution to your conversational contributions over dinner, drinks, or to fill that awkward silence that pops up unexpectedly. Be thin, White and attractive for crowdfunding success! It’s […]

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A law firm’s financial success & the managing partners’ face
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  • August 17, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 752 views

The Bias Awareness Scale 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s a new way to measure our awareness of our own biases in four easy questions. Yes. Four. We are constantly writing about bias here and when we see ways to measure bias it is usually convoluted or prohibitively expensive, or contains language not suitable for courtroom use. This scale, however, is different—it is short […]

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The Bias Blind Spot Scale 
Is racial bias fueling anti-Obama rhetoric?
The Islamophobia Scale: Measuring our fear of Muslims


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  • August 10, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,042 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Do you follow your head or your heart?  

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

And….do you think I can now guess your opinion on abortion? And brain death? It’s like a dream-state voir dire question. Today’s researchers used 8 different studies to explore the relationship between participants identifying with either the head or the heart and the participants’ positions on various hot-button issues. It’s a question that has been […]

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Adam, H, Obodaru, O, & Galinsky, AD. (2015) Who you are is where you are: Antecedents and con sequencing of locating the self in the brain or the heart. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 74-83. info:/

  • August 3, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 634 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Combatting distrust of science  

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

The art of persuasion is often complex and diverse, but today’s study also shows how it can be simple and elegant. Here’s a surprisingly easy way to diminish the automatic, knee-jerk and distrusting reaction to scientific findings. Tell your listeners about scientific consensus. Today’s researchers call consensus a “gateway belief” that results in the ability […]

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Simple Jury Persuasion: Educating jurors about science may have no effect
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  • July 31, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 707 views

Workplace rudeness: Death of a thousand cuts 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

It makes sense. If someone is rude to you, you might become grumpy and be rude in response, or rude to those who cross your path in the wake of the mistreatment. You may think of this as a small issue but new research shows us that rude behaviors are actually harmful—and, in fact, as […]

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The Workplace Ostracism Scale: Making the subjective objective?
Fat bias in the workplace
Who benefits from racism in the workplace?


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  • July 29, 2015
  • 02:09 PM
  • 1,400 views

The “Invisible Web” Undermines Health Information Privacy

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

What do the third parties do with your data? We do not really know because the laws and regulations are rather fuzzy here. We do know that Google, Facebook and Twitter primarily make money by advertising so they could potentially use your info and customize the ads you see. Just because you visited a page on breast cancer does not mean that the "Invisible Web" knows your name and address but they do know that you have some interest in breast cancer. It would make financial sense to sen........ Read more »

  • July 29, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 572 views

70% of evangelicals do not see religion and science as in  conflict

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

At least those are the findings of the Religious Understandings of Science (RUS) study which is based on a “nationally representative survey of more than 10,000 Americans”. Sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), this study (completed in early 2014) hit the media about a year later. Sociologist Elaine Howard Ecklund […]

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Ecklund, EH, & Scheitle, C. (2014) Religious Communities, Science, Scientists, and Perceptions:A Comprehensive Survey. Annual Meetings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. . info:/

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