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  • January 13, 2011
  • 10:00 AM
  • 5,961 views

Help Jurors Detect (or Protect) Holes in Expert Analysis

by Dr. Kevin Boully in Persuasive Litigator

by: Dr. Kevin Boully Infamous rock singer Courtney Love is in trouble again. Unless you’re her lawyer (or one of her forgiving fans)1, you are probably wondering what Love’s troubles have to do with your persuasive advocacy. Fair question. The Hole lead singer’s 2009 Twitter tirade against fashion designer Dawn Simorangkir made her a defendant in a defamation lawsuit that may be headed for trial in early February.2 Most importantly, Ms. Simorangkir has reportedly retained a social media ........ Read more »

  • January 10, 2011
  • 12:40 PM
  • 1,721 views

Count Your Plaintiffs Before Certification Hatches: Class Size Matters in Some Unexpected Ways

by Dr. Ken Broda-Bahm in Persuasive Litigator

By: Dr. Ken Broda-Bahm - When dealing with the number of plaintiffs in a class action, mass tort, or other large scale litigation, is "Super-Size Me" the plaintiff's best choice? At a legal level, the U.S. Supreme Court will get a chance to weigh in, after the decision last week to determine whether as many as 1.5 million female Wal-Mart workers claiming gender discrimination can be certified as a class (Dukes v. Wal-Mart). The common belief is that a large number of plaintiffs serves to maximiz........ Read more »

Loran F. Nordgren and Mary-Hunter Morris McDonnell. (2010) The Scope-Severity Paradox: Why Doing More Harm Is Judged to be Less Harmful. Social Psychological and. info:/

  • January 3, 2011
  • 12:25 PM
  • 1,715 views

Is it time to question a lack of free will?

by Michelle Greene in NeurRealism

In the early 1980s, psychologist Benjamin Libet conducted a relatively simple experiment that critically shaped the way we think about free-will. Participants sat facing a clock, keeping a finger on a button, and were instructed to lift the finger whenever they pleased, remembering the clock time corresponding to the time when they decided to move the finger. All the while, EEG was being recorded. Libet found that 300-500 msec before participants moved (and about 150 msec before reporting that t........ Read more »

  • December 26, 2010
  • 12:57 PM
  • 1,094 views

My picks for the top studies of 2010

by Michelle Greene in NeurRealism

Presented in no particular order, here are the ten studies of 2010 that I found the most interesting. Enjoy!1. A Wandering Mind is an Unhappy MindI wrote about this study here. Authors used an iPhone app to obtain "what are you doing?", "what are you thinking about?" and "how happy are you right now?" data. It turns out that we are thinking about something other than what we are doing about half of the time, and these are the times we are least happy.2. Electrical Enhancement of Mathematical Abi........ Read more »

Killingsworth MA, & Gilbert DT. (2010) A wandering mind is an unhappy mind. Science (New York, N.Y.), 330(6006), 932. PMID: 21071660  

Job V, Dweck CS, & Walton GM. (2010) Ego depletion--is it all in your head?: implicit theories about willpower affect self-regulation. Psychological science : a journal of the American Psychological Society / APS, 21(11), 1686-93. PMID: 20876879  

Loetscher, T., Bockisch, C., Nicholls, M., & Brugger, P. (2010) Eye position predicts what number you have in mind. Current Biology, 20(6). DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2010.01.015  

Monti, M., Vanhaudenhuyse, A., Coleman, M., Boly, M., Pickard, J., Tshibanda, L., Owen, A., & Laureys, S. (2010) Willful Modulation of Brain Activity in Disorders of Consciousness. New England Journal of Medicine, 362(7), 579-589. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa0905370  

Owen, A., Hampshire, A., Grahn, J., Stenton, R., Dajani, S., Burns, A., Howard, R., & Ballard, C. (2010) Putting brain training to the test. Nature, 465(7299), 775-778. DOI: 10.1038/nature09042  

Bourgeois FT, Murthy S, & Mandl KD. (2010) Outcome reporting among drug trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov. Annals of internal medicine, 153(3), 158-66. PMID: 20679560  

Dosenbach NU, Nardos B, Cohen AL, Fair DA, Power JD, Church JA, Nelson SM, Wig GS, Vogel AC, Lessov-Schlaggar CN.... (2010) Prediction of individual brain maturity using fMRI. Science (New York, N.Y.), 329(5997), 1358-61. PMID: 20829489  

  • December 20, 2010
  • 05:42 AM
  • 1,087 views

The costs of reframing

by David Winter in Careers - in Theory

I have just returned once again from being a tutor on the AGCAS Guidance Skills (Advanced) course in Warwick. We had an intensive four days in which we encouraged a group of higher education careers advisers to deconstruct and rebuild their guidance practices and attitudes. Reframing is a crucial element of the course. We explore [...]... Read more »

Hamilton, R., Vohs, K., Sellier, A., & Meyvis, T. (2010) Being of two minds: Switching mindsets exhausts self-regulatory resources. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. DOI: 10.1016/j.obhdp.2010.11.005  

  • December 20, 2010
  • 01:42 AM
  • 2,147 views

How To Develop the Ability to Think Strategically

by Dr Shock in Dr Shock MD PhD


What is strategical thinking?
A key leadership requirement.
Strategic thinking is an individual thinking activity that benefits organizations. Its purpose is to discover competitive strategies to position the organization significantly differently from the present.
Experiences contributing to the development of strategic thinking in order of importance according to a survey in individuals who attended ten educational events sponsored [...]


Related posts:Taking the Pulse of the Healthcare Blog........ Read more »

Goldman E, Cahill T, & Filho RP. (2009) Experiences that develop the ability to think strategically. Journal of healthcare management / American College of Healthcare Executives, 54(6), 403. PMID: 20073185  

  • December 17, 2010
  • 04:57 PM
  • 1,283 views

Of Political Orgasms and the Scientific Method

by David Berreby in Mind Matters


This week's theme is epistemological unease in the sciences: Complaints in a number of disciplines that studies didn't really find the effects they're reporting. One reason for these worries is that many studies nowadays are never repeated. So today I'm going to consciously and rationally resist ...Read More
... Read more »

  • December 14, 2010
  • 12:07 AM
  • 1,484 views

Talk About a Global Obesity Problem: Animals Are Getting Fatter Too

by David Berreby in Mind Matters


Obesity is a growing global health problem, and we all know why, don't we? It's the fault of corporations that sell corn syrup, and a starkly unequal society (why would you want to quit smoking if you're trapped below the poverty level?) Or, if you prefer a different flavor of self-righteousness ...Read More
... Read more »

Klimentidis, Y., Beasley, T., Lin, H., Murati, G., Glass, G., Guyton, M., Newton, W., Jorgensen, M., Heymsfield, S., Kemnitz, J.... (2010) Canaries in the coal mine: a cross-species analysis of the plurality of obesity epidemics. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2010.1890  

Keith, S., Redden, D., Katzmarzyk, P., Boggiano, M., Hanlon, E., Benca, R., Ruden, D., Pietrobelli, A., Barger, J., Fontaine, K.... (2006) Putative contributors to the secular increase in obesity: exploring the roads less traveled. International Journal of Obesity, 30(11), 1585-1594. DOI: 10.1038/sj.ijo.0803326  

  • December 1, 2010
  • 12:30 PM
  • 1,659 views

Gratitude: Uniquely Human or Shared with Animals?

by Jason Goldman in The Thoughtful Animal



"Two chimps had been shut out of their shelter by mistake during a cold rain storm. They were standing dejeted, water streaming down their shivering bodies, when Professor Köhler chanced to pass." Upon opening the door for the two chimps, Dr. James Leuba recounts, "instead of scampering in without more ado, as many a child would have done, each of them delayed entering the warm shelter long enough to throw its arms around his benefactor in a frenzy of satisfaction."

"Chimpanzees," primatolog........ Read more »

Krisin E. Bonnie, & Frans B. M. de Waal. (2004) Primate Social Reciprocity and the Origin of Gratitude. in Robert A. Emmons , 213-229. info:/

Fehr, E., & Gächter, S. (2002) Altruistic punishment in humans. Nature, 415(6868), 137-140. DOI: 10.1038/415137a  

  • November 30, 2010
  • 05:56 PM
  • 902 views

A Lego Robot Uncovers Risk Behavior of Foraging Rats

by Michael Long in Phased

Robogator is a realistic mimic of a predator, enabling scientists to study fear of predation in rats, and possibly to study the effect of drugs designed to address human psychological disorders related to risk perception.... Read more »

  • November 30, 2010
  • 05:00 AM
  • 1,389 views

Overcoming recklessness

by David Winter in Careers - in Theory

Quite a while ago I blogged about Learned Helplessness and I followed it up with an unsettling video in which at teacher induced learned helplessness in half a class by making them attempt impossible anagrams. So I was interested to find out about another bit of research which used impossible anagrams to get students into [...]... Read more »

Webb TL, Sheeran P, Totterdell P, Miles E, Mansell W, & Baker S. (2010) Using implementation intentions to overcome the effect of mood on risky behaviour. The British journal of social psychology / the British Psychological Society. PMID: 21050527  

  • November 18, 2010
  • 10:15 AM
  • 1,477 views

What Can Dolphins Tell Us About The Evolution of Friendship?

by Jason Goldman in The Thoughtful Animal



Scientists thought they had a pretty good handle on the social interactions of bottlenose dophins (Tursiops). They've used the term fission-fusion dynamics to describe dolphin (and non-human primate) society and so far it has served researchers well. Fission-fusion societies among dolphins are characterized by two levels of social hierarchy: groups of two or three related males ("first-order alliances") which work together to guard one or more females from other males, and larger teams compris........ Read more »

  • November 16, 2010
  • 12:00 PM
  • 2,298 views

The more colourful the lie, the more people believe it, man!

by Caspar Addyman in Your Brain on Drugs

The Splintered Mind has a great guest piece by G. Randolph Mayes reflecting on John Allen Paulos’s latest piece in the New York Times, entitled “Stories vs. Statistics” , which reflects on counter intuitve work of Nobel prize winning work of Tversky and Kahneman on conjunction fallacies.... Read more »

  • October 20, 2010
  • 08:20 AM
  • 1,689 views

Should you try online jury research?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

I mean really. How do you know who is out there as your sample mock jury? There are a number of companies offering online jury research these days. And, as they say, it’s cheaper, it’s fast, and it gives you a window into the potential reactions to your case. Obviously, we have some bias about [...]

Related posts:New research on men: What do we know now?

Lighter Skin, More Like Me

Trial Skills Journal on the Web: The Jury Expert... Read more »

  • October 18, 2010
  • 08:23 AM
  • 1,398 views

Outsmarting your biases & helping jurors outsmart theirs too

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Emily Pronin is a Psychology professor at Princeton. She studies how we tend to see ourselves as different than others and how that leads us to judge ourselves as better than others to our own detriment. Recently, Dr. Pronin did a brief interview with the Washington Post on how our self-awareness blind spots lead us [...]

Related posts:Simple Jury Persuasion: Countering jury decision-making biases

When identifying punishment—will jurors focus on intent or outcome?

A pinch of this and a ........ Read more »

Mandel, G. (2005) Unaware of Our Unawareness. Science. info:/

  • October 8, 2010
  • 08:20 AM
  • 2,326 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: A Collision of Values and Attributions

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

When do liberals and conservatives veer away from their traditional styles of decision-making? How can you predict this and incorporate it into your case narrative strategy?... Read more »

  • May 27, 2010
  • 08:25 AM
  • 1,741 views

Your Brain on Fast Food

by Jason Goldman in The Thoughtful Animal

Some kids more readily recognize Ronald McDonald than the President of the United States of America. Sad, right?

Check out this exchange, from the 2004 movie Super Size Me:

Morgan Spurlock: [to kids] I'm gonna show you some pictures and I want you to tell me who they are.
Children: OK.
Morgan Spurlock: [Showing a picture of George Washington] Who's that?
Child: George Washington?
Morgan Spurlock: Good. Who was he?
Children: He was the 4th president. He freed the slaves. He could never tell a l........ Read more »

Zhong CB, & Devoe SE. (2010) You are how you eat: fast food and impatience. Psychological science : a journal of the American Psychological Society / APS, 21(5), 619-22. PMID: 20483836  

  • May 11, 2010
  • 04:00 AM
  • 1,646 views

The decisive moment

by David Winter in Careers - in Theory

Choosing an expensive item like a car can be hard enough. In 2006 Ap Dijksterhuis, a researcher from the University of Amsterdam, made things a bit harder. He gave people various items of information about a selection four of cars and asked them to choose the best option. The information had been engineered so that [...]... Read more »

  • October 19, 2008
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,156 views

Rational Choice Theory: Not as Dead as You Think

by Lindsay in Autist's Corner

Discusses an fMRI study of autistic people given a hypothetical choice between two amounts of money; the choice is a test of the "framing effect," which is the tendency most people have of choosing the amount of money that's described in positive terms, rather than the objectively larger amount. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,833 views

To Bee Or Not To Bee: How Bees Avoid Difficult Choices

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

Humans who are faced with difficult choices are often tempted to simply opt out of making a choice, especially when they realize that they cannot easily resolve their uncertainty as to which choice is the better choice. Some researchers consider this ability to opt out as an indicator of “meta-cognition”, a term used to describe “thinking about thinking”. Instead of plowing ahead with a random choice, humans can recognize that they lack adequate information and choose not........ Read more »

Clint J. Perry, & Andrew B. Barron. (2013) Honey bees selectively avoid difficult choices. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1314571110  

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