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All posts; Tags Include "Developmental Biology"

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  • May 12, 2017
  • 07:00 AM
  • 143 views

Friday Fellow: Spreading Earthmoss

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll If you still think mosses are uninteresting lifeforms, perhaps you will change your mind after knowing the spreading earthmoss, Physcomitrella patens. Found in temperate regions of the world, except for South America, but more commonly recorded in … Continue reading →... Read more »

Cove, D. (2005) The Moss Physcomitrella patens. Annual Review of Genetics, 39(1), 339-358. DOI: 10.1146/annurev.genet.39.073003.110214  

  • April 24, 2017
  • 04:22 AM
  • 219 views

Promising mouse model for Ngly1 deficiency

by adam phillips in It Ain't Magic

A recent study of Ngly1 deficient mice used a secondary knockout to create double knockouts with symptoms similar to human NGLY1 deficiency.... Read more »

  • November 1, 2016
  • 11:00 AM
  • 328 views

Giant pumpkins and other massive fruits

by Alice Breda in la-Plumeria

In the form of a creepy Jack-o’-lantern frightening kids who seek for treats, or of a creamy soup in a cold fall night, pumpkins are the most distinctive fruits we find on the market stands in this season. But this fruit, in its larger variants, is also at the center of a special type of competition that takes place every year. A group of fierce farmers equipped with large scales and the heaviest products of their fields meet up to determine who among them was able to grow the largest pump........ Read more »

  • October 8, 2016
  • 03:15 PM
  • 555 views

That time 20,000 jellyfish orbited Earth

by Emily Makowski in Sextraordinary!

Why did NASA put jellyfish aboard the space shuttle in the 1990s? I discuss the reasoning behind this experimentand the results.... Read more »

Spangenberg, D., Jernigan, T., McCombs, R., Lowe, B., Sampson, M., & Slusser, J. (1994) Development studies of Aurelia (Jellyfish) ephyrae which developed during the SLS-1 mission. Advances in Space Research, 14(8), 239-247. DOI: 10.1016/0273-1177(94)90408-1  

  • September 25, 2016
  • 09:29 PM
  • 463 views

Big news in iPS cell transplants

by adam phillips in It Ain't Magic

iPS cell-derived retinal cells have been successfully transplanted from one money to another without need of immunosuppressant drugs.... Read more »

  • August 24, 2016
  • 03:05 AM
  • 597 views

Keeping Your “Ion” The Ball – Salts and Life

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Lost at sea is no way to go to your everlasting reward. Sit in the sunshine too long and you lose your salts and all your functions go bonkers. Drink seawater and you end up with too much sodium and potassium and go nuts. Either way your dead, and it all has to do with your body’s tipping point and the kidney’s function in maintaining an osmotic potential. What is weirder - licorice can cause just about the same problem. ... Read more »

Räikkönen, K., Seckl, J., Heinonen, K., Pyhälä, R., Feldt, K., Jones, A., Pesonen, A., Phillips, D., Lahti, J., Järvenpää, A.... (2010) Maternal prenatal licorice consumption alters hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenocortical axis function in children. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 35(10), 1587-1593. DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2010.04.010  

  • July 7, 2016
  • 02:44 PM
  • 731 views

Biological fight: kites, mites, quite bright plights

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll A recently described fossil from the Silurian Herefordshire Lagerstätte in the United Kingdom has called much attention. The appearance of the creature was build by scanning the rock and creating a 3D reconstruction of the fossil. … Continue reading →... Read more »

Briggs, D., Siveter, D., Siveter, D., Sutton, M., & Legg, D. (2016) Tiny individuals attached to a new Silurian arthropod suggest a unique mode of brood care. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(16), 4410-4415. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1600489113  

Briggs, D., Siveter, D., Siveter, D., Sutton, M., & Legg, D. (2016) Reply to Piper: Aquilonifer’s kites are not mites . Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(24). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1606265113  

  • June 29, 2016
  • 06:20 AM
  • 735 views

Birdsong Babel: Different birds use different grammar rules

by gdw in FictionalFieldwork

Zizou listens carefully. She ignores her confines and tries to focus on the intruder’s song. There’s something odd about it. Something she can’t quite put her feather on. It’s familiar, yet… not familiar. The intruder is strong. He or she keeps signing incessantly. There’s no sight of him or her, though. She has to make a […]... Read more »

Olkowicz S, Kocourek M, Lučan RK, Porteš M, Fitch WT, Herculano-Houzel S, & Němec P. (2016) Birds have primate-like numbers of neurons in the forebrain. PNAS, 113(26), 7255-60. PMID: 27298365  

  • June 9, 2016
  • 11:21 AM
  • 605 views

Back to life – Resurrection plants and the future of food

by Alice Breda in la-Plumeria

Life on Earth was born in water. Then, about half a billion years ago, the first organisms stare colonizing lands that offered new spaces, less predators and, in time, abundant oxygen and nutrients. Still, the indissoluble bond that living organisms had with water remained, and in order to survive in this new environment plants and animals had to develop anatomical, physiological and behavioral adaptations to better obtain, manage and save water. Plant bodies, as well as ours, are mostly made of........ Read more »

Moore, J., Le, N., Brandt, W., Driouich, A., & Farrant, J. (2009) Towards a systems-based understanding of plant desiccation tolerance. Trends in Plant Science, 14(2), 110-117. DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2008.11.007  

  • June 1, 2016
  • 09:38 AM
  • 838 views

All hail our eight-limbed overlords

by gdw in FictionalFieldwork

(This is my first attempt to blend science and fiction in a single post. The idea is to write about a recent study or studies but explore it through small snippets of original fiction as well. Hope you like it. Feedback is always greatly appreciated…) # A carefully orchestrated dance of chromatophores flashed Octa’s agreement. […]... Read more »

Doubleday ZA, Prowse TA, Arkhipkin A, Pierce GJ, Semmens J, Steer M, Leporati SC, Lourenço S, Quetglas A, Sauer W.... (2016) Global proliferation of cephalopods. Current biology : CB, 26(10). PMID: 27218844  

  • June 1, 2016
  • 02:43 AM
  • 563 views

Organ regeneration in the lab

by jens wilkinson in It Ain't Magic

Interview with Takashi Tsuji, team leader of the Laboratory for Organ Regeneration at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology... Read more »

Takagi, R., Ishimaru, J., Sugawara, A., Toyoshima, K., Ishida, K., Ogawa, M., Sakakibara, K., Asakawa, K., Kashiwakura, A., Oshima, M.... (2016) Bioengineering a 3D integumentary organ system from iPS cells using an in vivo transplantation model. Science Advances, 2(4). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1500887  

  • April 17, 2016
  • 03:00 AM
  • 1,063 views

Week 15 In Review: Open-Access Science | 11 to 17 April

by TakFurTheKaffe in Tak Fur The Kaffe

Swarming Red Crabs, 11,000-year-old shaman headdress, 'superfast' wing muscles, slowdown of giant airstreams, and sexually transmitted infections in Neanderthals. Here are five of the latest scientific studies published open-access this week, ... Read more »

Stadtherr, L., Coumou, D., Petoukhov, V., Petri, S., & Rahmstorf, S. (2016) Record Balkan floods of 2014 linked to planetary wave resonance. Science Advances, 2(4). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501428  

  • March 6, 2016
  • 11:51 PM
  • 870 views

From evolutionary morphology to Godzilla

by adam phillips in It Ain't Magic

I recently spoke with Chief Scientist Shigeru Kuratani about evolutionary morphology, sci-fi monsters, the genius of Alien, and more.... Read more »

Sugahara, F., Pascual-Anaya, J., Oisi, Y., Kuraku, S., Aota, S., Adachi, N., Takagi, W., Hirai, T., Sato, N., Murakami, Y.... (2016) Evidence from cyclostomes for complex regionalization of the ancestral vertebrate brain. Nature, 531(7592), 97-100. DOI: 10.1038/nature16518  

  • February 13, 2016
  • 06:18 PM
  • 795 views

Virus factories and hijacked proteins: How could Zika cause microcephaly?

by Megan Cartwright in Science-Based Writing

There’s something missing from all the coverage of Zika virus, the mosquito-spread flavivirus that’s spread across 26 countries in the Americas since May 2015. While Zika usually doesn’t cause symptoms in adults, the outbreak coincided with a 20- to 40-fold … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • January 29, 2016
  • 10:14 AM
  • 758 views

The fossils hidden in our genome: geneticists turn into archeologists ... sort of.

by EE Giorgi in CHIMERAS

I often blog about viruses because, well, I work on viruses. Here's a quick summary of things I've blogged about that I find absolutely mind-blowing:1. About 10% of the human genome is made of genes we inherited from viruses that had replicated in our ancestors millions of years ago. 2. Viruses evolve as their hosts evolve (The Red Queen Effect), and in fact we can retrace their evolution in parallel with that of their hosts. The same is true within a single host, enabling us to retrace the evol........ Read more »

  • January 10, 2016
  • 07:00 AM
  • 898 views

Endosperm: the pivot of the sexual conflict in flowering plants

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll The theory of sexual selection, based on the idea that there are conflict of interests between males and females, is quite recognized, but almost entirely focused on animals, especially dioecious animals, i.e., animals in which males … Continue reading →... Read more »

Maruyama, D., Hamamura, Y., Takeuchi, H., Susaki, D., Nishimaki, M., Kurihara, D., Kasahara, R., & Higashiyama, T. (2013) Independent Control by Each Female Gamete Prevents the Attraction of Multiple Pollen Tubes. Developmental Cell, 25(3), 317-323. DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2013.03.013  

Schärer, L., Janicke, T., & Ramm, S. (2015) Sexual Conflict in Hermaphrodites. Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology, 7(1). DOI: 10.1101/cshperspect.a017673  

  • December 18, 2015
  • 10:11 AM
  • 868 views

Scientists reproduce a stress-induced phenotype in mouse pups thanks to epigenetic reprogramming

by EE Giorgi in CHIMERAS

© Elena E. GiorgiI'm excited to be blogging about science again, albeit only occasionally. Those of you who have been following the blog from its very beginnings, back in 2011, know that I've always been fascinated with epigenetics, one of my favorite topics to discuss. So much so that I've managed to include it into the plot of my detective thriller Chimeras. The thrills in the book are fictional, but the science is all real.I was talking with my colleague Karissa Sanbonmatsu last week, who's ........ Read more »

Rodgers AB, Morgan CP, Bronson SL, Revello S, & Bale TL. (2013) Paternal stress exposure alters sperm microRNA content and reprograms offspring HPA stress axis regulation. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 33(21), 9003-12. PMID: 23699511  

  • November 24, 2015
  • 06:19 AM
  • 1,305 views

Corn Color Concepts

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Indian corn isn’t corn, it’s maize. But not all corn is maize, corn is actually an old word that denotes the major crop of any particular region. The colors are most beautiful, including a newly breed variety called Carl’s Glass Gem corn. The spots of color were instrumental in our understanding of DNA and gene movement, but do you think we would be so fast to decorate our houses with it if it were common knowledge how much Indian corn has in common with the causative agents of........ Read more »

  • October 15, 2015
  • 10:58 PM
  • 1,054 views

Live-cell analysis of plant embryogenesis: Live-cell imaging, optical manipulation, and micro-engineering technologies

by Daisuke Kurihara in the Node

In multicellular animals and plants, the single-celled zygote develops into the embryo. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the zygote divides asymmetrically to form a small cytoplasmic apical cell, which is the precursor of the proembryo, and a large vacuolated basal cell, which develops into the extra-embryonic suspensor (Figure 1). Communication between the intra-embryo (proembryo[...]

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The post Live-cell analysis of plant embryogenesis: Live-cell imaging, optical manipulation........ Read more »

Kawashima, T., & Goldberg, R. (2010) The suspensor: not just suspending the embryo. Trends in Plant Science, 15(1), 23-30. DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2009.11.002  

Lafon-Placette, C., & Köhler, C. (2014) Embryo and endosperm, partners in seed development. Current Opinion in Plant Biology, 64-69. DOI: 10.1016/j.pbi.2013.11.008  

Bhatia, S., & Ingber, D. (2014) Microfluidic organs-on-chips. Nature Biotechnology, 32(8), 760-772. DOI: 10.1038/nbt.2989  

Gooh, K., Ueda, M., Aruga, K., Park, J., Arata, H., Higashiyama, T., & Kurihara, D. (2015) Live-Cell Imaging and Optical Manipulation of Arabidopsis Early Embryogenesis. Developmental Cell, 34(2), 242-251. DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2015.06.008  

van den Berg C, Willemsen V, Hendriks G, Weisbeek P, & Scheres B. (1997) Short-range control of cell differentiation in the Arabidopsis root meristem. Nature, 390(6657), 287-289. PMID: 9384380  

Higashiyama, T., Yabe, S., Sasaki, N., Nishimura, Y., Kuroiwa, H., & Kuroiwa, T. (2001) Pollen Tube Attraction by the Synergid Cell. Science, 293(5534), 1480-1483. DOI: 10.1126/science.1062429  

Tirlapur, U., & König, K. (2002) Targeted transfection by femtosecond laser. Nature, 418(6895), 290-291. DOI: 10.1038/418290a  

  • October 7, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,297 views

Twin Sons Of Different Mothers…… Or Fathers

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Can a pregnant woman get pregnant? Sounds like a riddle, but really it is superfetation. Getting pregnant in two successive cycles and having twins with different fathers really creates a problem in defining what twins actually are. Twins don’t have to be conceived at the same time, born at the same time, have the same father, or even be of the same “race.”... Read more »

Claas, M., Timmermans, A., & Bruinse, H. (2010) Case report: a black and white twin. Journal of Perinatology, 30(6), 434-436. DOI: 10.1038/jp.2009.156  

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