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  • March 31, 2016
  • 12:28 PM

Reproducibility in research results: the challenges of attributing reliability

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Recently projects have been developed with the aim to reproduce published research results in psychology, biology and economics to verify their reliability. The results indicate different degrees of reproducibility in each area, however, they served to alert the scientific community about how fragile results considered irrefutable can be and reflect on the role of science in self-correcting. … Read More →... Read more »

Anderson, C., Bahnik, �., Barnett-Cowan, M., Bosco, F., Chandler, J., Chartier, C., Cheung, F., Christopherson, C., Cordes, A., Cremata, E.... (2016) Response to Comment on "Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science". Science, 351(6277), 1037-1037. DOI: 10.1126/science.aad9163  

Allison, D., Brown, A., George, B., & Kaiser, K. (2016) Reproducibility: A tragedy of errors. Nature, 530(7588), 27-29. DOI: 10.1038/530027a  

Camerer, C., Dreber, A., Forsell, E., Ho, T., Huber, J., Johannesson, M., Kirchler, M., Almenberg, J., Altmejd, A., Chan, T.... (2016) Evaluating replicability of laboratory experiments in economics. Science, 351(6280), 1433-1436. DOI: 10.1126/science.aaf0918  

  • March 29, 2016
  • 11:01 AM

Nostalgia is a Muse

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

This view has been challenged by the University of Southampton researchers Constantine Sedikides and Tim Wildschut, who have spent the past decade studying the benefits of nostalgia. Not only do they disavow its disease status, they have conducted numerous studies which suggest that nostalgia can make us more creative, open-minded and charitable. The definition of nostalgia used by Sedikides and Wildschut as a "sentimental longing for one's past" is based on the contemporary usage........ Read more »

  • March 22, 2016
  • 04:23 PM

On the dangers of SciHub and hybrid journals

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Changes and developments in the way things are done are sometimes seen as threatening, as dangers. That is a natural, instinctive reaction, perhaps, but sometimes, the danger lies not so much in the development itself as in the things that the development in question prevents. There are two developments in science publishing and science communication that are seen as dangerous by many. Both developments are seen as threatening from opposite sides of the fence, so to speak. … Read More U........ Read more »

  • March 19, 2016
  • 12:20 AM

Supporting Instructional Analogies

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Hong Kong and Japanese teachers appear to be more attentive to the processing demands of relational comparisons than are U.S teachers. Their teaching reflects the use of strategies to reduce processing demands on their students. Such differences in adherence to sound cognitive principles may have a real impact on the likelihood that students benefit from analogies as instructional tools.... Read more »

  • March 16, 2016
  • 05:06 PM

FAIR guiding principles published in journal of the Nature Publishing Group family

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The FAIR principles provide at a high level of abstraction a precise and measurable set of qualities for research data publication and reuse - Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR). These principles address the increasing need of rigorous data management stewardship applicable to both human and computational users which will soon become a core activity within contemporary research projects in Open Science environments. … Read More →... Read more »

Wilkinson, M., Dumontier, M., Aalbersberg, I., Appleton, G., Axton, M., Baak, A., Blomberg, N., Boiten, J., da Silva Santos, L., Bourne, P.... (2016) The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship. Scientific Data, 160018. DOI: 10.1038/sdata.2016.18  

  • March 10, 2016
  • 09:45 AM

Speeding up research communication: the actions of SciELO

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The SciELO Program has been promoting the individualized publication of articles, increasing the frequency of publication and the anticipation of publication of new issues. The goal is to contribute to the improvement of SciELO journals in line with the current trend to accelerate research communication. … Read More →... Read more »

  • March 5, 2016
  • 06:30 PM

Retrieval Practice Effective for Young Students

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Post moved:

These results are about as straightforward as they come in the social sciences. In an article published in Frontiers in Psychology, researchers report the results of three experiments which show that the benefits of retrieval practice (practice with retrieving items from memory) extends to children as much as to adults.... Read more »

Jeffrey D. Karpicke, Janell R. Blunt, & Megan A. Smith. (2016) Retrieval-Based Learning: Positive Effects of Retrieval Practice in Elementary School Children. Frontiers in Psychology, 2-28. info:/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00350

  • March 4, 2016
  • 05:29 PM

May excessive transparency damage Science?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The scholarly community promoted and encouraged research transparency to curb the lack of reproducibility and scientific misconduct. However, this openness also opens room for attacks and harassment of researchers, often motivated by simple discrepancy between the results and even threats of physical and psychological violence. Learn how to recognize and protect yourself from attacks of this nature. … Read More →... Read more »

Wolfe-Simon, F., Blum, J., Kulp, T., Gordon, G., Hoeft, S., Pett-Ridge, J., Stolz, J., Webb, S., Weber, P., Davies, P.... (2010) A Bacterium That Can Grow by Using Arsenic Instead of Phosphorus. Science, 332(6034), 1163-1166. DOI: 10.1126/science.1197258  

  • March 2, 2016
  • 03:00 PM

Reading to Dogs May Improve Literacy

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

A new review of existing research finds reading to dogs may help children’s literacy – but the quality of evidence is weak.  That’s the conclusion of a new paper by Sophie Hallet al (University of Lincoln). They searched the literature for studies that investigate the effects of programs in which children read to dogs, and conducted a systematic review of 48 papers.They write, “The evidence suggests that reading to a dog may have a beneficial effect on a number of behavioural proces........ Read more »

  • February 28, 2016
  • 01:22 AM


by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Post moved:

At the moment, I would argue that modern educational thought does not pay sufficient attention to that first acquisition phase of learning. This does not seem to be a deliberate shifting of attentional resources away from Phase 1; rather, it is more a matter of conceptualizing "learning" as not having a Phase 1 at all—or a Phase 1 so straightforward and inevitable that it is of little interest to either practitioners or researcher........ Read more »

  • February 11, 2016
  • 04:15 PM

Science Teachers Confused About … Um, Science

by Jenny Ludmer in Rooster's Report

Scientists may be in agreement on the causes of climate change, but the US public is not. We can blame biased news sources all we want for this disconnect, but a new study suggests yet another explanation: our science teachers. Although most are teaching about global warming, many simply aren’t doing it right.... Read more »

Eric Plutzer, Mark McCaffrey, A. Lee Hannah, Joshua Rosenau, Minda Berbeco, & Ann H. Reid. (2016) Climate confusion among U.S. teachers. Science, 351(6274). info:/10.1126/science.aab3907

  • February 2, 2016
  • 12:53 PM

Are ‘predatory’ journals completely negative, or also a sign of something positive?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Something that is generally, and justifiably, considered negative, can, however, also be a harbinger of an underlying positive development. The case in point is the existence of so-called ‘predatory’ journals, which have – inevitably – emerged in an environment in which a true market for scientific publishing services is slowly taking shape. … Read More →... Read more »

Ding, X., Wellman, H., Wang, Y., Fu, G., & Lee, K. (2015) Theory-of-Mind Training Causes Honest Young Children to Lie. Psychological Science, 26(11), 1812-1821. DOI: 10.1177/0956797615604628  

  • January 27, 2016
  • 06:50 PM

Holding Back: Inhibition

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Post moved:

I remember years ago being required to write math problems containing unnecessary information so that students would have to choose the information that they needed. But just making kids do something is not the same thing as teaching them something. It is, rather, a total cave to assessment obsession—we just found a way to call assessment "instruction".... Read more »

  • January 27, 2016
  • 11:43 AM

21 Study Tips: Steal these Learning Strategies from Master Students

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

Can a bunch of study tips really help you do better in school? It’s annoying, isn’t it? You see them in every class. The students who seem to breeze on through. Coolly killing one test after another. How do they do it? Can you pinch the best study tips from these master students? Yep, you […]
Check out 21 Study Tips: Steal these Learning Strategies from Master Students, an original post on Thinker Academy.
... Read more »

  • January 21, 2016
  • 06:52 AM

Will your paper be more cited if published in Open Access?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Is there any positive relationship between open access and the amount of citations? Last year announced in its website that citations to papers in its repository could raise in percentages much higher than other repositories. Is it truth or exaggeration? … Read More →... Read more »

  • January 17, 2016
  • 12:30 AM

Perplexity Is Not Required for Learning

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Post moved:

Taken at face value, the relative lack of effect of such conflicts across a broad range of studies falsifies the cognitive conflict hypothesis: The difficulty of conceptual change must reside elsewhere than in conflict, or rather the lack thereof, between misconceptions and normatively correct subject matter.... Read more »

Ramsburg, J., & Ohlsson, S. (2016) Category change in the absence of cognitive conflict. Journal of Educational Psychology, 108(1), 98-113. DOI: 10.1037/edu0000050  

  • December 30, 2015
  • 10:19 AM

When Not Mandatory, Many Resident Physicians Did Not Get Flu Vaccine

by Marie Benz in Interview with: Mubdiul Ali Imtiaz, MD Department of Internal Medicine Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School Newark, NJ 07103.   Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Response: Resident physicians (RPs) were defined to be all individuals enrolled … Continue reading →
The post When Not Mandatory, Many Resident Physicians Did Not Get Flu Vaccine appeared first on
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Mubdiul Ali Imtiaz, MD. (2015) When Not Mandatory, Many Resident Physicians Did Not Get Flu Vaccine. info:/

  • December 30, 2015
  • 01:10 AM

Do Experts Make Bad Teachers? No.

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Post moved:

A pair of new studies has found that the stereotype of the aloof professor—you know, the one that is accomplished in her field but I'd like to see her come teach the kids in my school—might be, surprise surprise, a little unfair.

Researchers found that the superior content knowledge of mathematics professors (8 assistant professors and 7 full professors) relative to secondary teachers was associated with a significantly ........ Read more »

  • December 27, 2015
  • 10:30 PM

Cognitive Load Theory

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Post moved:

In some sense, a preference for explicit instruction, rather than being a pillar of cognitive load theory, is simply the logical consequence of accepting the two distinctions above—that biologically secondary and domain-specific knowledges differ significantly and qualitatively from their biologically primary, domain-general counterparts such that the former require explicit teaching whereas the latter do not.
... Read more »

  • December 16, 2015
  • 01:10 PM

Openness and quality of a published article

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Openness is a scientifically and societally relevant part of a published article's quality. It is time that openness is recognized as a most important element of the quality of a research publication and that those who judge researchers on their publications (e.g. tenure and promotion committees) take that into account. For the benefit of science and the benefit of society as a whole. … Read More →... Read more »

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