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All posts; Tags Include "Emotion"

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  • November 5, 2010
  • 06:40 PM
  • 1,120 views

Why Genes Aren't Enough to Create a Personality

by David Berreby in Mind Matters


Psychiatrists see a lot of people who are, to use the technical term, screwed up. Psychiatrists' talk, then, often turns around curing, or ameliorating, or at least preventing "bad" behaviors and feelings—drug addiction, violence, learning disabilities, crippling anxieties and the like. And a number of psychiatrists sounded that note at the University of Massachusetts conference on behavioral epigenetics last weekend. But throughout the proceedings, there was an undertow pullin........ Read more »

  • August 17, 2010
  • 03:23 PM
  • 1,106 views

Becoming a Better Person: The Good, the Bad, and the Past

by Psychothalamus in Psychothalamus

When we think of ourselves as being morally good or morally bad, what goes on in our brains? What moral memories does our mind gather to affirm that we are one or the other, and how are these memories influenced by cognitive biases?In some ways, we are already aware of some cognitive biases in the way we remember events. For example, we know of an "emotional bias" where emotional memories are remembered more vividly, are typically easier to retrieve and seem more familiar, even when the actual ........ Read more »

  • March 6, 2010
  • 01:00 PM
  • 1,219 views

Succès hollywoodiens et transformée de Fourier

by Dr. Goulu in Pourquoi Comment Combien

James E. Cutting, professeur de psychologie à Cornell a mesuré la durée des plans de 150 films tournés entre 1935 et 2005. Première chose étonnante : ces films d'une durée moyenne de 126 minutes contiennent de 231 plans pour "Seven Year Itch" (1950) à 3099 pour "King Kong" (2005) , et en moyenne 1132 plans d'une durée toujours aussi moyenne de 6.68 secondes seulement... Read more »

Cutting JE, DeLong JE, & Nothelfer CE. (2010) Attention and the evolution of Hollywood film. Psychological science, 21(3), 432-9. PMID: 20424081  

  • January 24, 2010
  • 06:00 AM
  • 734 views

What Love and Attraction Smells Of

by Linda in Oz Blog No. 159

I'd read (somewhere) that bouquets of chemicals you release when you meet 'that someone' become a concoction for hell that loving feeling. (Somewhat reminds me of that wacky Sandra Bullock film Love Potion No. 9). For the first 6 months-year you release endorphins, adrenaline, oxytocin. Subsequently, you might get 'butterflies', the sweats, sleepless nights, loss of appetite etc. etc. What causes that initial attraction anyways? i find it so random. If it was just person........ Read more »

Wedekind C, Seebeck T, Bettens F, & Paepke AJ. (1995) MHC-dependent mate preferences in humans. Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society, 260(1359), 245-9. PMID: 7630893  

  • December 18, 2009
  • 03:19 AM
  • 1,381 views

Kittens in the Operating Room

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

Facing a difficult surgery to remove that pesky medial sphenoid wing meningioma? Be sure your neurosurgeon looks at pictures of cute kittens and puppies before scrubbing up. Or so implies a goofy study by Sherman et al. (2009):Infantile physical morphology—marked by its “cuteness”—is thought to be a potent elicitor of caregiving, yet little is known about how cuteness may shape immediate behavior. To examine the function of cuteness and its role in caregiving, the authors tested whether ........ Read more »

  • December 7, 2009
  • 05:58 PM
  • 1,405 views

Emotions Interfere in Theory of Mind

by Daniel Hawes in Ingenious Monkey | 20-two-5

Annikas' friend brings her back some chocolate, and places it into the blue cupboard. Annika sees this and then goes out to play. While Annika is gone, her friend eats some chocolate and then places it into the red cupboard. Later, when Annika comes back and goes about getting a piece of chocolate, where will she look for it?

If you are a two year old, you will expect Annika to look for the chocolate in the red cupboard, simply because you know that is where the chocolate is. If you are a ........ Read more »

  • November 16, 2009
  • 02:29 PM
  • 2,166 views

Going with the flow: emotion regulation and coping

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living


I’m in two minds about attempting to regulate emotions. From ACT, and in particular, mindfulness, I’m learning that trying to control emotions and thoughts is darned near impossible – and unhelpful. From the research on the effect of pain on emotions and subsequently on self regulation, goals and coping, it seems that pain strongly [...]... Read more »

Hamilton, N., Karoly, P., & Kitzman, H. (2004) Self-Regulation and Chronic Pain:The Role of Emotion. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 28(5), 559-576. DOI: 10.1023/B:COTR.0000045565.88145.76  

  • November 16, 2009
  • 03:35 AM
  • 2,125 views

Theories of emotion, self-regulation and pain

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

Can chronic pain be a force that shapes how we go about responding to challenges within our environments?
Does chronic pain influence how we feel emotionally about daily activities that contribute to overall goals, and perhaps negatively bias the way we think about the process of setting and achieving goals?
I’ve already concluded that having [...]... Read more »

Hamilton, N., Karoly, P., & Kitzman, H. (2004) Self-Regulation and Chronic Pain:The Role of Emotion. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 28(5), 559-576. DOI: 10.1023/B:COTR.0000045565.88145.76  

  • November 12, 2009
  • 03:36 PM
  • 1,876 views

Emotions and self-regulation in chronic pain

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living


I posted about the reciprocal effect of emotions on goal content and today I want to look a little further into this.
A profound statement in the paper by Hamilton, Karoly & Kitzman is this: ‘If emotional well-being influences the selection and the valuation of a particular goal, then it is likely that the relationship between [...]... Read more »

Hamilton, N., Karoly, P., & Kitzman, H. (2004) Self-Regulation and Chronic Pain:The Role of Emotion. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 28(5), 559-576. DOI: 10.1023/B:COTR.0000045565.88145.76  

  • November 11, 2009
  • 02:15 AM
  • 1,940 views

‘What do I do when I’ve had enough’: The Effect of Emotions on Self-regulation & Chronic Pain

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living


As soon as read the first paragraph of the paper I’ve used as the basis for this post, I knew I was onto something that resonated with my original occupational therapy values. It says this:
‘Living with chronic pain is a balancing act. People with chronic pain are required to make daily decisions [...]... Read more »

Hamilton, N., Karoly, P., & Kitzman, H. (2004) Self-Regulation and Chronic Pain:The Role of Emotion. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 28(5), 559-576. DOI: 10.1023/B:COTR.0000045565.88145.76  

  • October 8, 2009
  • 04:22 PM
  • 2,087 views

Can Westerners understand emotions from a remote culture?

by Dave Munger in Cognitive Daily

Classical Indian dancing is a tradition that extends back 2,000 years. Unlike much Western dance, it is intended to express specific emotions and tell detailed stories. The Natyasastra, a text from the first or second century A.D., offers instructions for how to depict nine primary emotions, and these rules continue to be followed in Indian Classical dance today. This movie demonstrates one form of Indian Classical dance:



As you can see, each gesture has a highly-specific meaning, which, to ........ Read more »

  • May 12, 2009
  • 10:53 AM
  • 2,824 views

More emotional intelligence = more orgasms

by Greg Laden in Greg Laden's Blog

According to a study just coming out in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, "variations in emotional intelligence--the ability to identify and manage emotions of one's self and others--are associated with orgasmic frequency during intercourse and masturbation." Read the rest of this post... | Read the comments on this post...... Read more »

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