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  • September 29, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 960 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Should you consider 3-D for your courtroom videos?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Evidence admissibility issues aside, the answer is, “only if you can do it as well as they did in the 3D movie Polar Express”. As it turns out, 3D isn’t that much more impactful than 2D unless it’s done really, really well. Psychologists and neuroscientists studying emotion often use film clips for their research. So […]

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Bride DL, Crowell SE, Baucom BR, Kaufman EA, O'Connor CG, Skidmore CR, & Yaptangco M. (2014) Testing the Effectiveness of 3D Film for Laboratory-Based Studies of Emotion. PLoS ONE, 9(8). PMID: 25170878  

  • September 24, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 895 views

Unfaithful partner? Would you rather be seen as mature– or as competent and strong?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

According to new research, you can’t have both. Inspired by women who told them they “would not vote for Hillary Clinton [in the Presidential primaries a decade later] because she forgave then-President Bill Clinton’s infidelity”, these researchers looked at how male and female observers viewed male and female victims of infidelity based on how they […]

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How leaders look: Competent and trustworthy, but not dominant
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You wa........ Read more »

  • September 21, 2014
  • 11:43 PM
  • 1,185 views

The Short Story of Self-Control for Lawyers

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Juries hear the phrase “Excuse me, objection your Honor  . . . .”, or some other form, often not as polite, frequently during trials.  Due to TV and the movies, American jurors probably expect to hear the courtroom gladiator scream “I object . . . . !”   Alternatively, some lawyers ponder the dynamic flow [...]
The post The Short Story of Self-Control for Lawyers appeared first on Psycholawlogy.
... Read more »

Inzlicht, M., Legault, L., & Teper, R. (2014) Exploring the Mechanisms of Self-Control Improvement. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23(4), 302-307. DOI: 10.1177/0963721414534256  

  • September 17, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 802 views

The Disgust Scale: How have we missed this all this time?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We’ve covered a lot of the disgust research so it is curious to us that somehow we missed sharing the actual Disgust Scale with you earlier. The Disgust Scale was developed by the infamous Jonathan Haidt (his surname is pronounced “height”) back in 1994 before disgust was considered cool. In brief, the Disgust Scale was […]

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Disgust and lost confidence in our institutions
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Choosing to either disgust your jurors o........ Read more »

Olatunji, B. O., Haidt, J., McKay, D., David, B. (2008) Core, animal reminder, and contamination disgust: Three kinds of disgust with distinct personality, behavioral, physiological, and clinical correlates. Journal of Research in Personality, 1243-1259. info:/

  • September 15, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 941 views

“Smart people ask for (my) advice!”

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We are often wary of asking for advice for fear of looking dumb or appearing incompetent. Oddly enough, our fears may be unfounded based on some new research out of Harvard Business School. According to the researchers, asking for advice does not make you appear either dumb or incompetent. Instead, asking for advice makes you […]

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Brooks, AW, Gino, F, & Schweitzer, ME. (2014) Smart people ask for (my) advice: Seeking advice boosts perceptions of competence. . Harvard Business School Working Papers. info:/

  • September 15, 2014
  • 02:00 AM
  • 1,081 views

Emotional Intelligence Memo to Management: EI as a Buffer of [Lawyer] Stress in the Developmental Job Experience

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Emotional intelligence, according to recent leading edge research, can buffer negative emotional experiences associated with on-the-job learning assignments used by 0rganizations to enhance their stock of human capital.  For an organization to get ahead of the competition, its members perform at higher levels.  This means that the workers who take their skillset to the [...]
The post Emotional Intelligence Memo to Management: EI as a Buffer of [Lawyer] Stress in the Developmental Job Experien........ Read more »

  • September 3, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 772 views

“S/he is just not one of us…”

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Just over a year ago, The Jury Expert published an article on bias and ambiguity in times of economic stress. The article was titled Does This Recession Make Me Look Black? –and it focused on how White Americans see racially ambiguous appearing others as in-group members until times are tough and then we see them […]

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Nice guys really do finish last! (Or at ........ Read more »

Kteily, N, Cotterill, S, Sidanius, J, Sheehy-Skeffington, J, & Bergh, R. (2014) “Not one of us”: Predictors and consequences of denying in-group characteristics to ambiguous targets. . Personality . info:/

  • September 1, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 783 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: “The defendant is just an animal!” 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s a pretty simple way for Prosecutors to motivate jurors to lock up a Defendant and throw away the key. It’s all about language. There are words you can use to evoke a more negative (animalistic) sense of the Defendant and there are words that, while still describing egregious behavior, are more neutrally descriptive. The […]

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Vasquez, EA, Loughnan, S, Gootjes-Dreesbach, E, & Weger, U. (2014) The animal in you: Animalistic descriptions of a violent crime increase punishment of perpetrator. . Aggressive Behavior, 337-344. info:/

  • August 28, 2014
  • 02:02 AM
  • 777 views

Tandem Emotional Intelligence and Protection Against [Lawyer] Depression

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy


Emotional intelligence relates to individual differences in how we perceive, communicate, regulate, and understand emotions, both our own and those of others.  Two forms of emotional intelligence, ability [maximum performance] and trait [typical performance], combine and work in tandem to influence psychological adaptation.  Researchers recently investigated the “tandem” concept, and broke new ground [...]
The post Tandem Emotional Intelligence and Protection Against [Lawyer] Depression a........ Read more »

Davis, S., & Humphrey, N. (2014) Ability Versus Trait Emotional Intelligence. Journal of Individual Differences, 35(1), 54-62. DOI: 10.1027/1614-0001/a000127  

  • August 21, 2014
  • 04:05 PM
  • 1,065 views

The Mental Ill-Health of the Legal Profession: Overcommitment, Job Demands, and Job Resources and Their Relationship With Lawyers’ Depression and Anxiety

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Why do lawyers, “an occupation particularly at risk”, display such high levels of psychological distress?  A team of Australian researchers constructed a stress model specific to lawyers, and used it recently to investigate this very important question.  Their study provides new and important insights into the previously reported, but unexplored high levels of depression [...]
The post The Mental Ill-Health of the Legal Profession: Overcommitment, Job Demands, and Job Resources and Their R........ Read more »

  • August 13, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 873 views

“I see my patients as less than fully human”

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s an intriguing article on how some nurses cope with stress. If you think, based on the title of this post, they do it by dehumanizing their patients, you would be correct. Somehow we think this is not a good thing to admit on the witness stand, but it is an understandable and human reaction […]

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... Read more »

Trifiletti, E, Di Bernardo, GA, Falvo, R, & Capozza, D. (2014) Patients are not fully human: a nurse’s coping response to stress. . Journal of Applied Social Psychology. . info:/

  • August 12, 2014
  • 08:31 AM
  • 929 views

Work Context and [Lawyer] Procrastination: Psychological Processes and Factors Which Influence Self-Regulation Failure

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Lawyer work context:  Lawyers procrastinate. Lawyers have heavy workloads. This means that they have a large quantity of tasks to perform.  And, lawyers’ workloads require them to regularly engage their brains in highly complex work.  Also, this requires that engage themselves in high mental activation in order to complete their work. Lawyers fail to [...]
The post Work Context and [Lawyer] Procrastination: Psychological Processes and Factors Which Influence Self-Regulation Failure appeared........ Read more »

DeArmond, S., Matthews, R., & Bunk, J. (2014) Workload and procrastination: The roles of psychological detachment and fatigue. International Journal of Stress Management, 21(2), 137-161. DOI: 10.1037/a0034893  

  • August 6, 2014
  • 07:36 AM
  • 875 views

Emotions, Trust, and Advice–Important Connections for Lawyers and Clients

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Emotions (anger or gratitude), trust, and advice connect lawyers and their clients.  Sometimes people take your advice.  Sometimes they do not.  The word “complex” describes the advice-giving and advice-taking decision process.  Many factors, including moods and emotions, drive the dynamics of trust in that process.
While the researchers did not study the attorney-client relationship [...]
The post Emotions, Trust, and Advice–Important Connections for Lawyers and Clients appeared f........ Read more »

  • August 4, 2014
  • 02:10 PM
  • 975 views

Typical Items Facilitate Fear Learning, Atypical Items Don’t

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Have you ever recoiled at something because it reminds you of something else that you’re genuinely afraid of?  Research indicates that people have a propensity to generalize their fear — […]... Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 10:19 AM
  • 1,223 views

Higher Implicit Self-Esteem Linked to Positive Evaluation of Spouses

by amikulak in Daily Observations

It’s often said that we can’t love others unless we love ourselves.  According to a new study, this may be true, but perhaps in a different way than we expect: […]... Read more »

  • July 21, 2014
  • 02:33 AM
  • 966 views

Judicial Notice: Good-Bye to Cultural Baggage & Hello to Emotion Regulation and the New Ideal of the “[Emotionally Intelligent] Well-Regulated Judge”

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

“Judges experience emotion, expend energy to cope with it, and find that effort difficult.  Part of the difficulty is that law offers them no guidance.  For this, we need to turn to the psychology of emotion regulation.”  This post provides a glimpse into an interdisciplinary pursuit of a new ideal described by the authors [...]
The post Judicial Notice: Good-Bye to Cultural Baggage & Hello to Emotion Regulation and the New Ideal of the “[Emotionally Intelligent] Well-Regulated ........ Read more »

  • July 15, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,209 views

The Pressure of the World Cup Penalty Kick

by THE 'SCOPE in The 'Scope

Tim Howard was brilliant in goal for the United States at the 2014 World Cup. Flying all over the place, catching, punching, kicking – he looked like he was protecting his family home from post-apocalyptic cannibals. It was very impressive, but the US went out against Belgium 2-1 in extra time, despite Howard’s 17 saves, the most in a single World Cup game in 50 years. Tim Howard had a great game for the US, heck, a great tournament. So great in fact, that Wikipedia temporarily&nbs........ Read more »

BENJAMIN NOËL and JOHN VAN DER KAMP. (2012) Gaze behaviour during the soccer penalty kick: An investigation of the effects of strategy and anxiety. Int. J. Sport Psychol., 1-20. info:/

  • July 14, 2014
  • 12:40 AM
  • 1,203 views

Emotional Intelligence and High Potential [Lawyers] Employees: Out With the “Old Way” and In With the “New Way”– Use the EQ-i[2.0] Emotional Intelligence Assessment to Unlock the [Legal] Talent Vault and Select Who Shall Lead

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Human capital drives today’s rapidly changing business environment.  The legal services sector enjoys no exception from this reality.  The increasingly competitive business environment of legal services marketplace makes putting the right people in leadership roles critical to the success of legal services organizations.  The question “how to identify and select those who will lead [...]
The post Emotional Intelligence and High Potential [Lawyers] Employees: Out With the “Old Way&rd........ Read more »

  • June 19, 2014
  • 10:16 AM
  • 1,561 views

Everyday Aggression: We Hurt Those Closest to Us

by amikulak in Daily Observations

When we think of aggression, we might think of road rage or a bar fight, situations in which people are violent toward strangers.  But research suggests that aggression is actually […]... Read more »

South Richardson, D. (2014) Everyday Aggression Takes Many Forms. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23(3), 220-224. DOI: 10.1177/0963721414530143  

  • June 18, 2014
  • 09:30 AM
  • 1,424 views

The Effects of Canine Personality and Joint Activities on the Dog-Owner Relationship

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

A new study in Denmark by Iben Meyer and Bjørn Forkman (University of Copenhagen) investigates the influence of owner characteristics and canine personality on the relationship between dogs and their owners.Photo: Martin Valigursky / ShutterstockThe study of 421 dog owners aged 18 to 75 used data from dog personality tests taken between six months and two-and-a-half years earlier, and a questionnaire of owners that included the Monash Dog Owner Relationship Scale. The dogs were all pedigrees si........ Read more »

Meyer, I., & Forkman, B. (2014) Dog and owner characteristics affecting the dog–owner relationship. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research. DOI: 10.1016/j.jveb.2014.03.002  

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