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  • January 15, 2017
  • 07:04 AM
  • 456 views

What Differential-K Theory gets Wrong about Race Differences in Sexuality

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

This post critiques a study that attempted to test predictions of differential-K theory about racial differences in sexuality using data from a Durex condom survey. Better, more scientific data addresses this topic, and fails to confirm the predictions of this theory.... Read more »

Dutton, E., van der Linden, D., & Lynn, R. (2016) Population differences in androgen levels: A test of the Differential K theory. Personality and Individual Differences, 289-295. info:/

  • January 15, 2017
  • 06:05 AM
  • 443 views

Population Differences in Androgens Fail to Validate Richard Lynn's Claims about Racial Differences in Penis Size

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

The author of a study on population differences in androgens claimed that his findings support Lynn's claims about racial differences in penis length. Close analysis of the statistics used shows these conclusions are invalid.... Read more »

Dutton, E., van der Linden, D., & Lynn, R. (2016) Population differences in androgen levels: A test of the Differential K theory. Personality and Individual Differences, 289-295. info:/

  • December 31, 2016
  • 07:13 AM
  • 495 views

Population Differences in Androgens Fail to Support Differential-K Theory

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

A recent paper attempts to test predictions of Differential-K Theory about race differences using data on population differences in androgens.Close examination of this data shows that the predictions fail.... Read more »

Dutton, E., van der Linden, D., & Lynn, R. (2016) Population differences in androgen levels: A test of the Differential K theory. Personality and Individual Differences, 289-295. info:/

  • December 2, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 280 views

Should I trust you? Let me see your face… 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

If you try to identify what it is that makes someone trustworthy, you might list their forthrightness, values consistent with your own, or even their willingness to embrace unpopular positions. And that is all well and good but it likely is untrue. Instead, researchers tell us, we draw “relatively stable trustworthinesss impressions from facial appearance”. […]

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Your face can get you killed… 
Never trust a man with a wide face
You can tell a lot from looking at some........ Read more »

Klapper, A., Dotsch, R., van Rooij, I., & Wigboldus, D. (2016) Do we spontaneously form stable trustworthiness impressions from facial appearance?. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 111(5), 655-664. DOI: 10.1037/pspa0000062  

  • November 16, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 304 views

Beards, designing in discrimination, assertion for women, and the exhausting process of helping  

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

You are not seeing double. Over the last month we’ve kept reading and reading and reading but many of the articles we read for the blog were fun but just not substantive enough for a full blog post. So. Think of this as the director’s cut version of the blog—full of things you wish we’d […]

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Science knowledge, objectifying women, earning  power, and social media colors
Spiders, dogs, assassins, beards and the demons  of sleep paralysis (things you want to know........ Read more »

  • August 30, 2016
  • 05:48 PM
  • 478 views

How to Live a Life with More Positive Than Negative Feelings?

by Farid Pazhoohi in Epistemophil

Decision-making is the cognitive process of choosing a preferred option from among a set of options (Wilson and Keil 2001). Decision-making is present through every aspect of life, and making good decisions for every important occasion during lifetime is a human being’s constant endeavor (Garnham 2016). Historically, religion and philosophy have been the only domains […]... Read more »

  • August 29, 2016
  • 08:01 AM
  • 556 views

Web of lies, policies and politicians

by Sergio Graziosi in Writing my own user manual - Sergio Graziosi's Blog

In the previous post in this miniseries I’ve used the example of Brexit referendum to explore how allowing lies to be systematically upheld in public discourse is poisonous for democracy itself. The bleak conclusion was that people voted Brexit on…Read more ›... Read more »

Aktipis, C.A., & Kurzban, R.O. (2004) Is Homo Economicus extinct? Vernon Smith, Daniel Kahneman and the evolutionary perspective. Advances in Austrian Economics, 135-153. info:/

  • May 24, 2016
  • 06:22 PM
  • 605 views

Does ecology affect human behavior? Book Review

by Farid Pazhoohi in Epistemophil

In their book The Parasite-Stress Theory of Values and Sociality, Randy Thornhill, Distinguished Professor at The University of New Mexico, and Corey L. Fincher, Assistant Professor at University of Warwick, present a new interpretation of human values and cultural behaviors, on the basis of ecological variations in parasite-stress prevalence across and within nations. Before delineating […]... Read more »

Pazhoohi, F. (2016) The Parasite-Stress Theory of Values and Sociality, Infectious Disease, History and Human Values Worldwide (Book Review). Canadian Studies in Population, 43(1-2), 155-157. info:/

  • May 9, 2016
  • 11:47 AM
  • 643 views

Your face can get you killed… 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Here’s a sad study that tells us stereotypes are alive and well in American court systems. Let’s say you are unfortunate enough to be on trial for murder. According to this study, how wide your face is can be the difference between life and death if you are convicted–even if you are actually innocent. We’ve […]

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You can tell a lot from looking at someone’s face…
Never trust a man with a wide face
I can tell from your face that you are suicid........ Read more »

  • April 29, 2016
  • 11:32 AM
  • 644 views

Cuckoldary is rare in humans!

by Farid Pazhoohi in Epistemophil

Human behavioral scientists argue that extra-pair copulation is adaptive in human females, as through extra-pair copulation, women can acquire good genes from other potential mates. This is suggested because it is found that women experience greater sexual attraction to particular extra-pair men, but not their own partners, during their highest peak of fertility (Gangestad & […]... Read more »

Gangestad, S., & Thornhill, R. (2008) Human oestrus. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 275(1638), 991-1000. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2007.1425  

Larmuseau MH, Matthijs K, & Wenseleers T. (2016) Cuckolded Fathers Rare in Human Populations. Trends in ecology , 31(5), 327-9. PMID: 27107336  

  • April 24, 2016
  • 11:47 AM
  • 613 views

Mate Retention Tactics Decline with Age of Men

by Farid Pazhoohi in Epistemophil

Physical attractiveness influences mate selection across cultures, and youthfulness of women is associated with their future reproductive value and fertility. Men attribute importance to youthful features in females such as large eyes, small nose, higher pitched voice, and full lips and perceive these neotenous features as attractive. More feminine women report more frequently being guarded […]... Read more »

Pazhoohi, F., Jahromi, A., & Doyle, J. (2016) Mate Retention Tactics Decline with Age of Iranian Men. Evolutionary Psychological Science. DOI: 10.1007/s40806-016-0046-8  

  • April 22, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 724 views

Listen to that man! He is attractive and likely high in status

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

If a man is a good storyteller, we tend to see him as more attractive and as having higher status. That is, if we are looking for a long-term relationship partner. Unfortunately, it does not work for women storytellers with male audiences nor for those looking for a short-term relationship. This is the first series […]

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How I assess your status (or lack thereof) at a glance
When you wear glasses you are less attractive but more smart and trustworthy
Will Mozart or Metallic........ Read more »

  • February 13, 2016
  • 03:54 PM
  • 815 views

Where Are My Chocolates?: The Role of Gift Giving on Valentine's Day

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

I think that the day after Valentine’s Day is actually the best. After all, chocolate is 50 percent off. However, using the holiday as an excuse to delve into the myriad of studies that attempt to explain the complexity of human attraction and relationships is pretty fun. Last year I examined moves, specifically some fly dance moves and rather cheesy pick-up lines. Today, I think I’ll explore gift giving.In the field of animal behavior, gift giving (or nuptial gifts) is practically its own s........ Read more »

Rugimbana, R., Donahay, B., Neal, C., & Polonsky, M. (2003) The role of social power relations in gift giving on Valentine's Day. Journal of Consumer Behaviour, 3(1), 63-73. DOI: 10.1002/cb.122  

  • November 29, 2015
  • 11:45 PM
  • 981 views

Diversity and persistence of group tags under replicator dynamics

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Everyday I walk to the Stabile Research Building to drink espresso and sit in my cozy — although oversaturated with screens — office. Oh, and to chat about research with great people like Arturo Araujo, David Basanta, Jill Gallaher, Jacob Scott, Robert Vander Velde and other Moffitters. This walk to the office takes about 30 […]... Read more »

Jansson, F. (2015) What games support the evolution of an ingroup bias?. Journal of theoretical biology, 100-10. PMID: 25794651  

  • October 8, 2015
  • 11:38 AM
  • 842 views

Who Are You Wearing?: Does Competition Affect How Women View Luxury?

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

What do you think of when I say “luxury consumption”? Probably something that requires a Robin Leach voice over, right? Now what if I ask you why these luxuries are so valued? Is it because they are of excellent quality? Aesthetically appealing? Highly exclusive? Next, consider the audience for the luxury – who is admiring who? And what does that luxury symbolize? Status? Wealth? Success?A recent paper in Evolutionary Psychology takes a look at these questions and has one of the best title........ Read more »

  • September 23, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 758 views

Who has the deepest voice amongst the Republican  candidates for President?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

I watched the second Republican debate last week after reading two more articles on voice pitch and winning elections. Not coincidentally, I had to struggle to keep from focusing on who had the deepest voice among the candidates. We’ve written about this line of research before and tend to think of it as the Barry […]

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Republicans prefer ‘Republican-looking’ political candidates
Feel the power of that deep and resonant voice!
How leaders look: Competent and trustwort........ Read more »

  • September 13, 2015
  • 10:19 AM
  • 6,137 views

Evolutionary Theory of Consciousness: first reply to comments.

by Sergio Graziosi in Writing my own user manual - Sergio Graziosi's Blog

Two of my readers have kindly provided some very interesting comments and questions on my Evolutionary Theory of Consciousness paper (ETC). Because their comments and questions are very relevant and thought-provoking, I am publishing my reply as a separate post.…Read more ›... Read more »

Edelman DB, Baars BJ, & Seth AK. (2005) Identifying hallmarks of consciousness in non-mammalian species. Consciousness and cognition, 14(1), 169-87. PMID: 15766896  

Verzijden, M., Abbott, J. K.,, von Philipsborn, A., & Loeschcke, V. (2015) Male Drosophila melanogaster learn to prefer an arbitrary trait associated with female mating status. Current Zoology. (2015) Male Drosophila melanogaster learn to prefer an arbitrary trait associated with female mating status. Current Zoology, 61(6). info:/

  • June 10, 2015
  • 02:54 PM
  • 865 views

How Did Humans Learn to Count? Baboons May Offer Clues

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Learning to count comes early in life for humans. Most kids know how to count before they enter formal schooling and the ability to understand basic quantities is fundamental to […]... Read more »

Cantlon, J., Piantadosi, S., Ferrigno, S., Hughes, K., & Barnard, A. (2015) The Origins of Counting Algorithms. Psychological Science, 26(6), 853-865. DOI: 10.1177/0956797615572907  

  • April 22, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,349 views

Lumbersexuals with tattoos: Are they new and improved? 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Recently we blogged about an emerging demographic subgroup: the lumbersexual. After reading the flurry of mainstream media articles about this group, here is how we described them: “As far as we can tell, the lumbersexual is an urban male (typically White and heterosexual) who dresses like a lumberjack even though he is far from a […]

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Wait! Could that be a  lumbersexual in your venire panel?
The Millennials (aka ‘Gen Y’): On tattoos, TMI, tolerance and technology
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  • March 28, 2015
  • 11:00 AM
  • 1,136 views

Misbeliefs, evolution and games: a positive case

by Sergio Graziosi in Evolutionary Games Group

A recurrent theme here in TheEGG is the limits and reliability of knowledge. These get explored from many directions: on epistemological grounds, from the philosophy of science angle, but also formally, through game theory and simulations. In this post, I will explore the topic of misbeliefs as adaptations. Misbeliefs will be intended as ideas about […]... Read more »

Kaznatcheev, A., Montrey, M., & Shultz, T.R. (2014) Evolving useful delusions: Subjectively rational selfishness leads to objectively irrational cooperation. Proceedings of the 36th annual conference of the Cognitive Science Society. arXiv: 1405.0041v1

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