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  • January 24, 2017
  • 11:52 AM
  • 281 views

Crowdfunding and Tribefunding in Science

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Competition for government research grants to fund scientific research remains fierce in the United States. The budget of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which constitute the major source of funding for US biological and medical research, has been increased only modestly during the past decade but it is not even keeping up with inflation. This problem is compounded by the fact that more scientists are applying for grants now than one or two decades ago, forcing the NIH to enforce strict........ Read more »

Vachelard J, Gambarra-Soares T, Augustini G, Riul P, & Maracaja-Coutinho V. (2016) A Guide to Scientific Crowdfunding. PLoS Biology, 14(2). PMID: 26886064  

  • January 18, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 251 views

Nasty women earn more money (but it isn’t all roses) 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We have written a lot about how women are treated unequally (which can, sometimes, make it hard to be a woman). Initially, we illustrated these posts with various photos of Tammy Wynette but we decided to stop picking on her for one song (“Stand By Your Man”). So this post illustrates a rough truth (that […]... Read more »

  • December 6, 2016
  • 08:46 AM
  • 345 views

Are American Professors More Responsive to Requests Made by White Male Students?

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

The vast majority of professors will gladly meet a prospective graduate student and discuss research opportunities as well as long-term career options, especially if the student requesting the meeting clarifies the goal of the meeting. However, there are cases when students wait in vain for a response. Is it because their email never reached the professor because it got lost in the internet ether or a spam folder? Was the professor simply too busy to respond? A research study headed by Katherine........ Read more »

  • December 2, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 195 views

Should I trust you? Let me see your face… 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

If you try to identify what it is that makes someone trustworthy, you might list their forthrightness, values consistent with your own, or even their willingness to embrace unpopular positions. And that is all well and good but it likely is untrue. Instead, researchers tell us, we draw “relatively stable trustworthinesss impressions from facial appearance”. […]

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Your face can get you killed… 
Never trust a man with a wide face
You can tell a lot from looking at some........ Read more »

Klapper, A., Dotsch, R., van Rooij, I., & Wigboldus, D. (2016) Do we spontaneously form stable trustworthiness impressions from facial appearance?. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 111(5), 655-664. DOI: 10.1037/pspa0000062  

  • November 16, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 213 views

Beards, designing in discrimination, assertion for women, and the exhausting process of helping  

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

You are not seeing double. Over the last month we’ve kept reading and reading and reading but many of the articles we read for the blog were fun but just not substantive enough for a full blog post. So. Think of this as the director’s cut version of the blog—full of things you wish we’d […]

Related posts:
Science knowledge, objectifying women, earning  power, and social media colors
Spiders, dogs, assassins, beards and the demons  of sleep paralysis (things you want to know........ Read more »

  • November 10, 2016
  • 11:55 AM
  • 349 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: When does your client need to go  beyond apology?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Gender stereotypes are powerful things and when your client has broken gender stereotypes and broken trust with others, they need to go beyond mere apology. First, a bit about what gender stereotypes are: Women are expected to be benevolent and concerned about others while men are expected to be confident, competitive and independent. Go against […]

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Simple Jury Persuasion: When your Muslim female client wears a head-covering
Simple Jury Persuasion: “I transgressed. Pleas........ Read more »

Frawley, S., & Harrison, J. (2016) A social role perspective on trust repair. Journal of Management Development, 35(8), 1045-1055. DOI: 10.1108/JMD-10-2015-0149  

  • June 20, 2016
  • 10:44 AM
  • 672 views

The Mesh of Civilizations in Cyberspace

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

A team of researchers from Stanford University, Cornell University and Yahoo recently decided to evaluate the "connectedness" of the hypothesized Huntington civilizations in cyberspace and published their results in the article "The Mesh of Civilizations in the Global Network of Digital Communication".

The researchers examined Twitter users and the exchange of emails between Yahoo-Mail users in 90 countries with a minimum population of five million. In total, they analyzed........ Read more »

  • June 15, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 661 views

The Maladaptive Daydreaming Scale (MDS) 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We posted earlier this week about the new concept of “maladaptive daydreaming” and those researchers published a second article on an actual 14-item scale to assess whether a specific individual is a maladaptive daydreamer. Since it’s a strange area that may end up in the courtroom—we thought we’d share information and some of the items […]

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The Motivation to Express Prejudice Scale 
The Dirty Dozen Scale 
The Fear of Missing Out (FoMO) Scale


... Read more »

Somer E, Lehrfeld J, Bigelsen J, & Jopp DS. (2016) Development and validation of the Maladaptive Daydreaming Scale (MDS). Consciousness and Cognition, 77-91. PMID: 26707384  

  • April 27, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 480 views

A cure for the know-it-all: “Reflecting on explanatory ability” 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Most of us think we know more than we actually do and sometimes, that sense is taken to an extreme that can be annoying (as well as inaccurate). Two years ago, we wrote about a study on modulating political extremism and mentioned the recommended strategy was similar to one we use to topple self-appointed “experts” […]

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Uncommon Wisdom: Lessons from Patent and IP  Mock Jurors
So can you explain how that works in your own words?
Guilt-proneness and the ability to recog........ Read more »

  • April 6, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 797 views

“The Chocolate Cake Model”: Too much of a  narcissist is a nauseating thing

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Much like the chocolate cake staring at you from the dessert tray in that fine restaurant, the narcissist initially seems irresistible—but like the cake, when you indulge in a relationship with the narcissist, you will probably end up sick to your stomach. It’s called the Chocolate Cake Model of narcissism. And it’s  how today’s researchers […]

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So…are you a narcissist? [The Ivy League  edition]
“I am so tired of people mistaking me for a model!” [#humblebr........ Read more »

Ong CW, Roberts R, Arthur CA, Woodman T, & Akehurst S. (2016) The Leader Ship Is Sinking: A Temporal Investigation of Narcissistic Leadership. Journal of Personality, 84(2), 237-47. PMID: 25487857  

  • February 29, 2016
  • 06:41 PM
  • 903 views

How (and when) to communicate sarcasm in email and texts 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

[Spoiler alert: Don’t do it. And especially don’t do it on a group message. But if you must, make it clear you are kidding.] We have covered the use of emoticons in legal settings before, but here’s a research article looking at what helps the receiver understand the context in which your written comments are […]

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When is it just an email and when is it retaliation?
Simple Jury Persuasion: Should you communicate the details or the big picture?
Does Face-to-Face Inter........ Read more »

Filik R, Țurcan A, Thompson D, Harvey N, Davies H, & Turner A. (2015) Sarcasm and emoticons: Comprehension and emotional impact. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 1-17. PMID: 26513274  

  • February 22, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 758 views

Substance use and other mental health concerns among US  attorneys

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Over the past few years, following a number of high-profile attorney suicides, much more attention has focused on mental health needs of attorneys. The study we are featuring today was funded by the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation and the ABA Commission on Lawyer Assistance Programs. In short, the authors conclude we need to pay more […]

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Reports of novel or contradictory health research reduces public trust  in science
Lying makes me sick!
Defense Attorneys: More Sisyphus........ Read more »

  • January 25, 2016
  • 11:55 AM
  • 769 views

Want to be a leader? Maybe you should grow a  mustache…

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’re unsure if this strategy would work for women but it seems to work for men—at least in medical schools and teaching hospitals. We do presume those male leaders with mustaches do not have the sort of mustache illustrating this post but what do we know? We also tend to believe that if a woman […]

Related posts:
You wanted to be a leader! Act like one! (or else)
Gender and Leadership: When Do Women Excel?
Now, that’s a good-looking leader! (At  least, in this group.)


... Read more »

  • January 5, 2016
  • 09:16 AM
  • 1,409 views

We Have Become Exhausted Slaves in a Culture of Positivity

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

We live in an era of exhaustion and fatigue, caused by an incessant compulsion to perform. This is one of the central tenets of the book "Müdigkeitsgesellschaft" (translatable as "The Fatigue Society" or "The Tiredness Society") by the German philosopher Byung-Chul Han. Han is a professor at the Berlin Universität der Künste (University of the Arts) and one of the most widely read contemporary philosophers in Germany. He was born in Seoul where he stu........ Read more »

Byung-Chul Han. (2015) The Burnout Society. Stanford University Press. info:/

  • December 8, 2015
  • 12:46 PM
  • 1,253 views

The Dire State of Science in the Muslim World

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Universities and the scientific infrastructures in Muslim-majority countries need to undergo radical reforms if they want to avoid falling by the wayside in a world characterized by major scientific and technological innovations. This is the conclusion reached by Nidhal Guessoum and Athar Osama in their recent commentary "Institutions: Revive universities of the Muslim world", published in the scientific journal Nature. The physics and astronomy professor Guessoum (American University ........ Read more »

  • August 21, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 792 views

This and that: The secret to crowdfunding success, cold offices,  and nosy smartphones

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s another collection of interesting tidbits that don’t rate an entire blog post on their own but that we think worthy of mention. Think of them as our contribution to your conversational contributions over dinner, drinks, or to fill that awkward silence that pops up unexpectedly. Be thin, White and attractive for crowdfunding success! It’s […]

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A law firm’s financial success & the managing partners’ face
Intergenerational Law Offices and Intergenerationa........ Read more »

  • August 17, 2015
  • 08:03 AM
  • 633 views

Perseverance Negatively Correlated with Counterproductive Work Behaviours

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

New research shows that perseverance might be a key character strength when it comes to counterproductive work behaviours. The researchers were interested in finding the character strengths that were most correlated with work performance and counterproductive work behaviours (things like absenteeism, lateness, … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 14, 2015
  • 08:04 AM
  • 717 views

Board Diversity Paramount for Achieving Corporate Benefits

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

Earlier this year, there was some interesting research published about board diversity, as it relates to achieving corporate benefits. Specifically: Board diversity improves governance and product development especially in firms led by White men CEOs. There are at least two … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 31, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 687 views

Workplace rudeness: Death of a thousand cuts 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

It makes sense. If someone is rude to you, you might become grumpy and be rude in response, or rude to those who cross your path in the wake of the mistreatment. You may think of this as a small issue but new research shows us that rude behaviors are actually harmful—and, in fact, as […]

Related posts:
The Workplace Ostracism Scale: Making the subjective objective?
Fat bias in the workplace
Who benefits from racism in the workplace?


... Read more »

  • July 13, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 683 views

Why good people do bad things (and how to stop) 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Here’s a really easy solution to our tendency to sometimes do bad things: be aware of the temptation and think of the longterm consequences of the behavior. It’s a simple answer to a vexing problem that has been with us for millennia. Researchers wanted to see how identifying an ethical conflict and considering the long-term […]

Related posts:
Which is the more moral negotiator? The male or the female?
Women are easily misled so why not lie to them in negotiations?
You can stop smok........ Read more »

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