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  • September 9, 2014
  • 01:53 AM
  • 1,068 views

The “A,B,Cs” of Interests and How You [Lawyers] Can Know Them

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

You [lawyers] have interests.  Interests provide us potent motivation for goal-oriented behavior.  We should not ignore them because interests, a very important individual difference trait variable, “are powerful predictors of educational and career choice, performance, and success”.  A recent review of psychological science literature by leading scholars provides a concise summary of current knowledge [...]
The post The “A,B,Cs” of Interests and How You [Lawyers] Can Know The........ Read more »

Rounds, J., & Su, R. (2014) The Nature and Power of Interests. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23(2), 98-103. DOI: 10.1177/0963721414522812  

  • September 5, 2014
  • 01:34 AM
  • 1,163 views

Brief Mindfulness Meditation Primer for Lawyers

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Can lawyers learn about its distinct components, and practice a process which involves interrelated components of attention regulation, body awareness, emotion regulation, and change in perspective on the self, and reach higher levels of self-compassion and well-being?  Stated another way, the question asks  “Can lawyers learn and practice mindfulness meditation?”  The short answer is [...]
The post Brief Mindfulness Meditation Primer for Lawyers appeared first on Psycholawlogy.
... Read more »

  • August 27, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 1,221 views

Just how diverse is this group, really?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We often make assumptions when discussing diversity that we all perceive a group’s diversity in the same way. Today’s research shows that simply isn’t so. That is, you and I (depending on our racial in-group) can look at the same group and you might say it is diverse while I say it is not. What […]

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Improving working relationships in your ethnically diverse jury
Religion, ethnicity and Asian-American’s voting patterns
Proof we don’t hire the most qualified candid........ Read more »

  • August 25, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 926 views

Women are easily misled so why not lie to them in negotiations?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Back in 2012, we wrote about which gender was the more moral in negotiations. (Spoiler alert: it was women.) Now we have a new article on why women get lied to in negotiations. Not when or if–but why. Basically, people believe women are more easily misled than men and people believe women to be less […]

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Which is the more moral negotiator? The male or the female?
Negotiating Salary 101 for Women Only
Negotiations: Starting high and ending with nothing


... Read more »

Kray, LJ, Kennedy, JA, & Van Zant, AB. (2014) Not competent enough to know the difference? Gender stereotypes about women’s ease of being misled predict negotiator deception. . Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. info:/

  • August 21, 2014
  • 04:05 PM
  • 1,064 views

The Mental Ill-Health of the Legal Profession: Overcommitment, Job Demands, and Job Resources and Their Relationship With Lawyers’ Depression and Anxiety

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Why do lawyers, “an occupation particularly at risk”, display such high levels of psychological distress?  A team of Australian researchers constructed a stress model specific to lawyers, and used it recently to investigate this very important question.  Their study provides new and important insights into the previously reported, but unexplored high levels of depression [...]
The post The Mental Ill-Health of the Legal Profession: Overcommitment, Job Demands, and Job Resources and Their R........ Read more »

  • August 6, 2014
  • 07:36 AM
  • 874 views

Emotions, Trust, and Advice–Important Connections for Lawyers and Clients

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Emotions (anger or gratitude), trust, and advice connect lawyers and their clients.  Sometimes people take your advice.  Sometimes they do not.  The word “complex” describes the advice-giving and advice-taking decision process.  Many factors, including moods and emotions, drive the dynamics of trust in that process.
While the researchers did not study the attorney-client relationship [...]
The post Emotions, Trust, and Advice–Important Connections for Lawyers and Clients appeared f........ Read more »

  • July 21, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 1,110 views

Should you do group brainstorming standing up or sitting down?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

The American Bar Association is seeking nominations until August 8, 2014 to help it decide on the Top 100 law blogs (“Blawgs”). We have been in the ABA Top 100 for the past 4 years and would like to make it 5! If you like this blog, please nominate us (it’s fast and free) here. THANKS! Doug and […]

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When in-group rebels have a cause…
The latest issue of The Jury Expert is a total classic!
“It was ‘a man’s work’ and I just didn’t like working wi........ Read more »

Knight, AP, & Baer, M. (2014) Get up, Stand up: The effects of a non-sedentary workspace on information elaboration and group performance. . Social Psychological and Personality Science. . info:/

  • July 21, 2014
  • 02:33 AM
  • 965 views

Judicial Notice: Good-Bye to Cultural Baggage & Hello to Emotion Regulation and the New Ideal of the “[Emotionally Intelligent] Well-Regulated Judge”

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

“Judges experience emotion, expend energy to cope with it, and find that effort difficult.  Part of the difficulty is that law offers them no guidance.  For this, we need to turn to the psychology of emotion regulation.”  This post provides a glimpse into an interdisciplinary pursuit of a new ideal described by the authors [...]
The post Judicial Notice: Good-Bye to Cultural Baggage & Hello to Emotion Regulation and the New Ideal of the “[Emotionally Intelligent] Well-Regulated ........ Read more »

  • July 16, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 984 views

The Workplace Ostracism Scale: Making the subjective objective?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It’s always tough to measure something that seems very subjective. Like ostracism. Are you being ostracized (excluded, left out, or shunned) or are you just way too sensitive? Intrepid researchers have pushed forward though and brought us the Workplace Ostracism Scale. Ostracism is very much like incivility which is seen as very hard to objectively […]

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Fat bias in the workplace
Would you rather be harassed or ostracized at work?
Who benefits from racism in the workplace........ Read more »

Ferris DL, Brown DJ, Berry JW, & Lian H. (2008) The development and validation of the Workplace Ostracism Scale. The Journal of Applied Psychology, 93(6), 1348-66. PMID: 19025252  

  • July 14, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 1,048 views

Would you rather be harassed or ostracized at work?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

What a choice. We have written before about incivility in the workplace and that sounds a lot like what these researchers are calling ostracism. To begin, let’s look at how the researchers define both harassment and ostracism. In brief, say the researchers, harassment is the presence of an unwanted behavior and ostracism is the absence […]

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Fat bias in the workplace
“It was ‘a man’s work’ and I just didn’t like working with those incompetent women….”
........ Read more »

  • July 14, 2014
  • 12:40 AM
  • 1,202 views

Emotional Intelligence and High Potential [Lawyers] Employees: Out With the “Old Way” and In With the “New Way”– Use the EQ-i[2.0] Emotional Intelligence Assessment to Unlock the [Legal] Talent Vault and Select Who Shall Lead

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Human capital drives today’s rapidly changing business environment.  The legal services sector enjoys no exception from this reality.  The increasingly competitive business environment of legal services marketplace makes putting the right people in leadership roles critical to the success of legal services organizations.  The question “how to identify and select those who will lead [...]
The post Emotional Intelligence and High Potential [Lawyers] Employees: Out With the “Old Way&rd........ Read more »

  • July 2, 2014
  • 10:30 AM
  • 1,210 views

Is Outrage Over the Facebook Mood Manipulation Study Anti-Science or Ignorance?

by Richard Landers in NeoAcademic

By now, you’ve probably heard about the latest controversy coming from Facebook – a researcher internal to Facebook, along with two university collaborators, recently published a paper in PNAS[1] that included an experimental manipulation of mood. Specifically, the researchers randomly assigned about 700,000 Facebook users to test an interesting causal question: does the emotional content […]The post Is Outrage Over the Facebook Mood Manipulation Study Anti-Science or Ignorance........ Read more »

Kramer, A., Guillory, J., & Hancock, J. (2014) Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(24), 8788-8790. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1320040111  

  • June 13, 2014
  • 03:05 PM
  • 773 views

Procrastination & Sleep

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

The newest form of procrastination and a rising health issue: bedtime procrastination. [Infographic]... Read more »

  • June 3, 2014
  • 08:37 AM
  • 1,449 views

Sharing Our Sorrow Via Facebook

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

Geteiltes Leid ist halbes Leid ("Shared sorrow is half the sorrow") is a popular German proverb which refers to the importance of sharing bad news and troubling experiences with others. The therapeutic process of sharing takes on many different forms: we may take comfort in the fact that others have experienced similar forms of sorrow, we are often reassured by the empathy and encouragement we receive from friends, and even the mere process of narrating the details of what is troubling........ Read more »

  • June 2, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 944 views

You wanted to be a leader! Act like one! (or else)

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We’ve written about women and leadership before. While some new research shows female leaders handle stress more effectively than male leaders, we’re not going to write about that one today. Instead, here is a report on a study showing some other good news: women are no longer punished for behaving assertively in a leadership role! […]

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Everyday racism at work: Hope for African American Women?
“It was ‘a man’s work’........ Read more »

  • May 31, 2014
  • 11:06 AM
  • 977 views

Ostracism, A Stressful and Aversive Part of Everday Life

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Ostracizers ignore and exclude others. Their victims have all sorts of negative reactions to this social rejection, which generally threatens the target’s sense of worth and existence. Ostracism victims’ hurt ranges from increased sadness and anger to decreased feelings of belonging, control, self-esteem, and meaningful existence.
Researchers recently explored those powerful effects of this [...]
The post Ostracism, A Stressful and Aversive Part of Everday Life appeared first on Psyc........ Read more »

Nezlek, J., Wesselmann, E., Wheeler, L., & Williams, K. (2012) Ostracism in everyday life. Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice, 16(2), 91-104. DOI: 10.1037/a0028029  

  • May 22, 2014
  • 11:40 AM
  • 922 views

Do Public Salaries Increase Performance?

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

With the recent news regarding Jill Abramson and the New York Times, I wanted to take a closer look at the academic literature to see if I could find something about public salaries. There’s certainly been a lot written about whether she … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • May 19, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 790 views

Fat bias in the workplace

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

It is likely not a surprise to you that there is a significant public bias against the obese. Frequent flyers are familiar with the feeling of dread as a morbidly obese passenger approaches your row and seems to slow down. But fat bias doesn’t just happen in confined spaces. Workplace incivility is often directed at […]

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Should you ask your overweight female client to diet before trial?
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  • May 13, 2014
  • 03:00 PM
  • 1,211 views

Climate Talks and Game Theory: A better Approach

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Climate change talks, it’s like yelling at a wall and hoping it becomes a window. For over two decades, members of the United Nations have tried to forge an agreement […]... Read more »

  • May 12, 2014
  • 08:02 AM
  • 940 views

I’ll show you who’s boss: The Spitefulness Scale

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve been down this road before and brought you the Depravity Scale, the Comprehensive Assessment of Sadistic Tendencies Scale, the Guilt and Shame Proneness Scale and the Islamophobia Scale. Now however, it’s time for a check on how spiteful you are. We all know spite when we see it. Dawdling in their parking space because […]

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The GASP scal........ Read more »

Marcus DK, Zeigler-Hill V, Mercer SH, & Norris AL. (2014) The Psychology of Spite and the Measurement of Spitefulness. Psychological Assessment. PMID: 24548150  

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