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  • March 26, 2017
  • 11:14 AM
  • 122 views

Multilingual novelties

by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira in Being Multilingual

P { margin-bottom: 0.08in; } Research on multilingualism has mushroomed over the past 50 years or so, which must be a good thing. Although some publications do take multilingual norms as multilingual norms, most research has proceeded through the bias of monolingual standards, which is not so good for the obvious reason that multilinguals aren’t monolinguals. Equally biased is the academic and media hype spawned by the flurry of interest in current multilingualism, which risks spawning, in t........ Read more »

Laes, C. (2013) Polyglots in Roman Antiquity. Writing Socio-Cultural History Based on Anecdotes. Literatura 55(3). info:/

Schendl, H. (2015) Code-switching in early English literature. Language and Literature, 24(3), 233-248. DOI: 10.1177/0963947015585245  

  • July 27, 2016
  • 07:20 AM
  • 621 views

The Nature of Science of Nature

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

One the tenets of science is that hypotheses can't be proved, only disproved. But medical journals do not publish negative data, even though this is often helpful to scientists and physicians. A recent TED Talk by Ben Goldacre illustrates this point in the context of drug studies. In a bigger sense – is this really the only way to do science; to follow this one scientific method?... Read more »

Ben Goldacre. (2012) What doctors don't know about the drugs they prescribe. TED MED. info:/

  • November 13, 2014
  • 02:01 PM
  • 915 views

25 Years after the Fall of Berlin Wall

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Social Science

For 28 years, the Berlin Wall stood as a physical reminder of the Cold War's destruction of civil liberties and a barrier against reconstruction. On November 9, 1989, the world anxiously awaited as Berliners gathered to dismantle the wall that separated families, economies, and opportunities.... Read more »

  • October 15, 2014
  • 04:36 AM
  • 800 views

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Mid-Cingulate Cortex

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

What happens in the brain during a highly immersive reading experience? According to the fiction feeling hypothesis (Jacobs, 2014), narratives with highly emotional content cause a deeper sense of immersion by engaging the affective empathy network to a greater extent than neutral narratives. Emotional empathy – in this case, the ability to identify with a fictional character via grounded metarepresentations of ‘global emotional moments’ (Hsu et al., 2014) – relies on  a number of b........ Read more »

  • January 22, 2014
  • 03:45 PM
  • 802 views

TDD Improves Quality

by Greger Wikstrand in Greger Wikstrand

TDD Improves QualityTDD improves quality! That might sound obvious, but evidently it isn’t. Test driven development (TDD) is often cited as a key agile practice (1,2). But still, the evidence has been equivocal until now. What is TDD? If you already know what TDD is you should probably skip this section. If not, here is a super-brief […]From Greger Wikstrand - #agile, #projectmanagement, #ehealth, #mhealth #phr, #professionalism, #SoftwareEngineering by Greger Wikstrand .
Related pos........ Read more »

  • May 9, 2013
  • 08:43 AM
  • 1,363 views

Reflections on WebSci‘13

by Peter Kraker in Science and the Web

I spent last week at Web Science 2013 in Paris. And what a well spent time that was. Web Science was for sure the most diverse conference I have ever attended. One of the reasons for this diversity is that Webscience was collocated with CHI (Human-Computer-Interaction) and Hypertext. But most importantly, the community of Webscience …Read More... Read more »

Peter Kraker, Kris Jack, Christian Schlögl, Christoph Trattner, & Stefanie Lindstaedt. (2013) Head Start: Improving Academic Literature Search with Overview Visualizations based on Readership Statistics. Web Science 2013. info:/

  • October 6, 2012
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,882 views

The Nature Of Science Of Nature

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

One the tenets of science is that hypotheses can't be proved, only disproved. But medical journals do not publish negative data, even though this is often helpful to scientists and physicians. A recent TED Talk by Ben Goldacre illustrates this point in the context of drug studies.... Read more »

Ben Goldacre. (2012) What doctors don't know about the drugs they prescribe. TED MED. info:/

  • June 11, 2012
  • 11:14 PM
  • 1,425 views

Literature references in science: insightful or annoying?

by TheCellularScale in The Cellular Scale

"It is in our brains that the poppy is red, that the apple is odorous, that the skylark sings" -Oscar Wilde(image source) I am pretty into literature, and I am generally in favor of art + science collaborations. I recently gushed about how cool it was that Aldous Huxley (famous author) was the half brother of Andrew Huxley (Nobel Prize winning neuroscientist). But honestly, I cringe almost every time I read a paper with "Proust" in the title. This is most likely because psych........ Read more »

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