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  • April 6, 2016
  • 01:02 PM

World Serology Bank: Key to a Better Understanding of Infectious Disease Dynamics?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Zoonoticus

An article published in The Lancet today has highlighted the possibility of establishing a World Serology Bank to better understand the dynamics of infectious disease dynamics, especially in an era where vaccinations against infectious diseases is becoming more and more prevalent. With rapid advance in diagnostic technologies, there has been impressive progress in what used […]... Read more »

  • March 31, 2016
  • 12:28 PM

Reproducibility in research results: the challenges of attributing reliability

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Recently projects have been developed with the aim to reproduce published research results in psychology, biology and economics to verify their reliability. The results indicate different degrees of reproducibility in each area, however, they served to alert the scientific community about how fragile results considered irrefutable can be and reflect on the role of science in self-correcting. … Read More →... Read more »

Anderson, C., Bahnik, �., Barnett-Cowan, M., Bosco, F., Chandler, J., Chartier, C., Cheung, F., Christopherson, C., Cordes, A., Cremata, E.... (2016) Response to Comment on "Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science". Science, 351(6277), 1037-1037. DOI: 10.1126/science.aad9163  

Allison, D., Brown, A., George, B., & Kaiser, K. (2016) Reproducibility: A tragedy of errors. Nature, 530(7588), 27-29. DOI: 10.1038/530027a  

Camerer, C., Dreber, A., Forsell, E., Ho, T., Huber, J., Johannesson, M., Kirchler, M., Almenberg, J., Altmejd, A., Chan, T.... (2016) Evaluating replicability of laboratory experiments in economics. Science, 351(6280), 1433-1436. DOI: 10.1126/science.aaf0918  

  • March 22, 2016
  • 04:23 PM

On the dangers of SciHub and hybrid journals

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Changes and developments in the way things are done are sometimes seen as threatening, as dangers. That is a natural, instinctive reaction, perhaps, but sometimes, the danger lies not so much in the development itself as in the things that the development in question prevents. There are two developments in science publishing and science communication that are seen as dangerous by many. Both developments are seen as threatening from opposite sides of the fence, so to speak. … Read More U........ Read more »

  • March 16, 2016
  • 05:06 PM

FAIR guiding principles published in journal of the Nature Publishing Group family

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The FAIR principles provide at a high level of abstraction a precise and measurable set of qualities for research data publication and reuse - Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR). These principles address the increasing need of rigorous data management stewardship applicable to both human and computational users which will soon become a core activity within contemporary research projects in Open Science environments. … Read More →... Read more »

Wilkinson, M., Dumontier, M., Aalbersberg, I., Appleton, G., Axton, M., Baak, A., Blomberg, N., Boiten, J., da Silva Santos, L., Bourne, P.... (2016) The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship. Scientific Data, 160018. DOI: 10.1038/sdata.2016.18  

  • March 10, 2016
  • 09:45 AM

Speeding up research communication: the actions of SciELO

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The SciELO Program has been promoting the individualized publication of articles, increasing the frequency of publication and the anticipation of publication of new issues. The goal is to contribute to the improvement of SciELO journals in line with the current trend to accelerate research communication. … Read More →... Read more »

  • March 4, 2016
  • 05:29 PM

May excessive transparency damage Science?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The scholarly community promoted and encouraged research transparency to curb the lack of reproducibility and scientific misconduct. However, this openness also opens room for attacks and harassment of researchers, often motivated by simple discrepancy between the results and even threats of physical and psychological violence. Learn how to recognize and protect yourself from attacks of this nature. … Read More →... Read more »

Wolfe-Simon, F., Blum, J., Kulp, T., Gordon, G., Hoeft, S., Pett-Ridge, J., Stolz, J., Webb, S., Weber, P., Davies, P.... (2010) A Bacterium That Can Grow by Using Arsenic Instead of Phosphorus. Science, 332(6034), 1163-1166. DOI: 10.1126/science.1197258  

  • February 28, 2016
  • 09:35 AM

Week 8 In Review: Open-Access Science | 22 to 28 Feb

by TakFurTheKaffe in Tak Fur The Kaffe

Sea level rose faster in the 20th century than in any other century of the last 3,000 years, new methods for estimating future sea level rise and heat waves, consumers to blame for their carbon footprint, and new virtual forests predict future impacts of climate change. Here are five of the latest scientific studies published open-access this week.... Read more »

Kopp, R., Kemp, A., Bittermann, K., Horton, B., Donnelly, J., Gehrels, W., Hay, C., Mitrovica, J., Morrow, E., & Rahmstorf, S. (2016) Temperature-driven global sea-level variability in the Common Era. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201517056. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1517056113  

Mengel, M., Levermann, A., Frieler, K., Robinson, A., Marzeion, B., & Winkelmann, R. (2016) Future sea level rise constrained by observations and long-term commitment. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201500515. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1500515113  

Ivanova, D., Stadler, K., Steen-Olsen, K., Wood, R., Vita, G., Tukker, A., & Hertwich, E. (2015) Environmental Impact Assessment of Household Consumption. Journal of Industrial Ecology. DOI: 10.1111/jiec.12371  

  • February 23, 2016
  • 05:42 PM

Carbon Cuts Can Benefit Us Now

by Jenny Ludmer in Rooster's Report

It’s not just about the next generation anymore. According to a new study from Duke University, low-carbon policies will result in cleaner air — and that could lead to 300,000 fewer premature deaths over the next 15 years. In other words, we’d be saving U.S. lives now.... Read more »

  • February 19, 2016
  • 12:07 PM

Fighting fishermen

by dominicwhite in Two Degrees or Under

Palau is a small archipelago in the western Pacific. Like many countries in the region, fish forms a key part of the diet and economy. But, again like many of its neighbours in Southeast Asia, overfishing is a big problem....... Read more »

  • February 9, 2016
  • 09:28 AM

Bring Me Sunshine...

by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

The latest Public Health statement is about the dangers of suntanning. But what IS a suntan? And how could it lead to cancer...?... Read more »

NICE. (2016) Sunlight exposure: risks and benefits. National Institute for Health . info:/

Newton-Bishop, J., Chang, Y., Elliott, F., Chan, M., Leake, S., Karpavicius, B., Haynes, S., Fitzgibbon, E., Kukalizch, K., Randerson-Moor, J.... (2011) Relationship between sun exposure and melanoma risk for tumours in different body sites in a large case-control study in a temperate climate. European Journal of Cancer, 47(5), 732-741. DOI: 10.1016/j.ejca.2010.10.008  

  • February 2, 2016
  • 12:53 PM

Are ‘predatory’ journals completely negative, or also a sign of something positive?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Something that is generally, and justifiably, considered negative, can, however, also be a harbinger of an underlying positive development. The case in point is the existence of so-called ‘predatory’ journals, which have – inevitably – emerged in an environment in which a true market for scientific publishing services is slowly taking shape. … Read More →... Read more »

Ding, X., Wellman, H., Wang, Y., Fu, G., & Lee, K. (2015) Theory-of-Mind Training Causes Honest Young Children to Lie. Psychological Science, 26(11), 1812-1821. DOI: 10.1177/0956797615604628  

  • January 21, 2016
  • 06:52 AM

Will your paper be more cited if published in Open Access?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Is there any positive relationship between open access and the amount of citations? Last year announced in its website that citations to papers in its repository could raise in percentages much higher than other repositories. Is it truth or exaggeration? … Read More →... Read more »

  • January 16, 2016
  • 07:22 PM

Damm(n)ing the Amazon

by dominicwhite in Two Degrees or Under

From the abstract of a recent Science paper: The world’s most biodiverse river basins—the Amazon, Congo, and Mekong—are experiencing an unprecedented boom in construction of hydropower dams. These projects address important energy needs, but advocates often overestimate economic benefits and...... Read more »

Winemiller, K., McIntyre, P., Castello, L., Fluet-Chouinard, E., Giarrizzo, T., Nam, S., Baird, I., Darwall, W., Lujan, N., Harrison, I.... (2016) Balancing hydropower and biodiversity in the Amazon, Congo, and Mekong. Science, 351(6269), 128-129. DOI: 10.1126/science.aac7082  

  • January 9, 2016
  • 04:36 PM

Turning to the “Infected Jelly” to Treat Ebola

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

The NEJM has come out with a very interesting paper: Evaluation of Convalescent Plasma for Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea. The explosive outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease in West Africa last year had hijacked the headlines and media space in a big way. Multiple solutions were touted, including the vaccine trial STRIVE. Few articles, however, looked…... Read more »

van Griensven J, Edwards T, de Lamballerie X, Semple MG, Gallian P, Baize S, Horby PW, Raoul H, Magassouba N, Antierens A.... (2016) Evaluation of Convalescent Plasma for Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea. The New England journal of medicine, 374(1), 33-42. PMID: 26735992  

  • January 9, 2016
  • 02:28 PM

If Colistin Goes, Can Carbapenems be Far Behind?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

I wrote about the disaster-in-the-making discovery of transmissible resistance to colistin, a last resort antibiotic, when the Lancet Infectious Diseases published a paper based on data coming out from surveillance in China. At that point of time, the isolation of the transmissible gene providing resistance (mcr1 gene) gained a lot of attention. Maryn McKenna’s blog post went…... Read more »

  • January 8, 2016
  • 12:01 PM

Devil in a bottle?

by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

The media are on the warpath again! This time, it's alcohol. But is this new?... Read more »

Department of Health. (2016) Alcohol Guidelines Review – Report from the Guidelines development group to the UK Chief Medical Officers. info:/

Bagnardi, V., Rota, M., Botteri, E., Tramacere, I., Islami, F., Fedirko, V., Scotti, L., Jenab, M., Turati, F., Pasquali, E.... (2012) Light alcohol drinking and cancer: a meta-analysis. Annals of Oncology, 24(2), 301-308. DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mds337  

  • December 31, 2015
  • 04:10 AM

ASCB15 – part 2

by Gal Haimovich in Green Fluorescent Blog

I ended Part 1 after the morning session on pushing the boundaries of imaging. After the amazing talks on imaging, I browsed the halls, visited some exhibitors, sampled a couple of exhibitor tech-talks. I later went to a mycrosymposium (#2: signaling … Continue reading →... Read more »

Smith C, Lari A, Derrer CP, Ouwehand A, Rossouw A, Huisman M, Dange T, Hopman M, Joseph A, Zenklusen D.... (2015) In vivo single-particle imaging of nuclear mRNA export in budding yeast demonstrates an essential role for Mex67p. The Journal of cell biology, 211(6), 1121-30. PMID: 26694837  

Nelles DA, Fang MY, Aigner S, & Yeo GW. (2015) Applications of Cas9 as an RNA-programmed RNA-binding protein. BioEssays : news and reviews in molecular, cellular and developmental biology, 37(7), 732-9. PMID: 25880497  

Vale RD. (2015) Accelerating scientific publication in biology. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112(44), 13439-46. PMID: 26508643  

  • December 16, 2015
  • 01:10 PM

Openness and quality of a published article

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Openness is a scientifically and societally relevant part of a published article's quality. It is time that openness is recognized as a most important element of the quality of a research publication and that those who judge researchers on their publications (e.g. tenure and promotion committees) take that into account. For the benefit of science and the benefit of society as a whole. … Read More →... Read more »

  • December 10, 2015
  • 09:02 AM

The Serengeti at a crossroads

by naturallyspeakingpodcast in Naturally Speaking Podcast

Is there a better option to paving a highway through the middle of the Serengeti and disrupting the greatest land migration on Earth? The conflict between conservation and development is something we have touched on at Naturally Speaking before—here at the Institute our researchers understand that a fine balance between the two must be achieved. However, […]

... Read more »

  • December 8, 2015
  • 01:46 PM

The Dire State of Science in the Muslim World

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Universities and the scientific infrastructures in Muslim-majority countries need to undergo radical reforms if they want to avoid falling by the wayside in a world characterized by major scientific and technological innovations. This is the conclusion reached by Nidhal Guessoum and Athar Osama in their recent commentary "Institutions: Revive universities of the Muslim world", published in the scientific journal Nature. The physics and astronomy professor Guessoum (American University ........ Read more »

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