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All posts; Tags Include "Quantitative Psychology"

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  • January 9, 2017
  • 05:48 AM
  • 290 views

The curious effect of a musical rhythm on us

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Do you know the feeling of a musical piece moving you? What is this feeling? One common answer by psychological researchers is that what you feel is your attention moving in sync with the music. In a new paper I show that this explanation is mistaken. Watch the start of the following video and observe […]... Read more »

Kunert R, & Jongman SR. (2017) Entrainment to an auditory signal: Is attention involved?. Journal of experimental psychology. General, 146(1), 77-88. PMID: 28054814  

  • July 15, 2016
  • 05:56 AM
  • 653 views

How to test for music skills

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

In a new article I evaluate a recently developed test for music listening skills. To my great surprise the test behaves very well. This could open the path to better understand the psychology underlying music listening. Why am I surprised? I got my first taste of how difficult it is to replicate published scientific results […]... Read more »

Singleton, C., Horne, J., & Simmons, F. (2009) Computerised screening for dyslexia in adults. Journal of Research in Reading, 32(1), 137-152. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9817.2008.01386.x  

  • October 7, 2015
  • 11:30 PM
  • 805 views

Social Class Differences in Mental Health: Do Parenting Style and Friendship Play a Role?

by Mark Rubin in Mark Rubin's Social Psychology Research Blog

It is now well-established that social class is positively related to mental health. However, researchers remain unclear about the specific processes that underlie the relation between social class and depression. In some recent research, we investigated the potential roles of parenting style and friendship in explaining the relationship between social class and mental health.... Read more »

  • September 3, 2015
  • 08:28 PM
  • 942 views

Reproducibility project: A front row seat

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

A recent paper in Science reports the results of a large-scale effort to test reproducibility in psychological science. The results have caused much discussion (as well they should) in both general public and science forums. I thought I would offer my perspective as the lead author of one of the studies that was included in the reproducibility analysis. I had heard about the project even before being contacted to participate and one of the things that appealed to me about it was that they were t........ Read more »

  • April 20, 2015
  • 09:45 AM
  • 915 views

Aphasia factors vs. subtypes

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

One of the interesting things (to me anyway) that came out of our recent factor analysis project (Mirman et al., 2015, in press; see Part 1 and Part 2) is a way of reconsidering aphasia types in terms of psycholinguistic factors rather than the traditional clinical aphasia subtypes. The traditional aphasia subtyping approach is to use a diagnostic test like the Western Aphasia Battery or the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination to assign an individual with aphasia to one of several subtype cate........ Read more »

Mirman, D., Chen, Q., Zhang, Y., Wang, Z., Faseyitan, O.K., Coslett, H.B., & Schwartz, M.F. (2015) Neural Organization of Spoken Language Revealed by Lesion-Symptom Mapping. Nature Communications, 6(6762), 1-9. info:/

  • April 17, 2015
  • 10:03 AM
  • 972 views

Mapping the language system: Part 2

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

This is the second of a multi-part post about a pair of papers that just came out (Mirman et al., 2015, in press). Part 1 was about the behavioral data: we started with 17 behavioral measures from 99 participants with aphasia following left hemisphere stroke. Using factor analysis, we reduced those 17 measures to 4 underlying factors: Semantic Recognition, Speech Production, Speech Recognition, and Semantic Errors. For each of these factors, we then used voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (........ Read more »

Hickok G. (2012) Computational neuroanatomy of speech production. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 13(2), 135-145. PMID: 22218206  

Hickok, Gregory S, & Poeppel, David. (2007) The cortical organization of speech processing. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 8(May), 393-402. info:/

Zhang Y., Kimberg D.Y., Coslett H.B., Schwartz M.F., & Wang Z. (2014) Multivariate lesion-symptom mapping using support vector regression. Human Brain Mapping, 35(12), 5861-5876. PMID: 25044213  

  • April 16, 2015
  • 09:48 AM
  • 867 views

Mapping the language system: Part 1

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

My colleagues and I have a pair of papers coming out in Nature Communications and Neuropsychologia that I'm particularly excited about. The data came from Myrna Schwartz's long-running anatomical case series project in which behavioral and structural neuroimaging data were collected from a large sample of individuals with aphasia following left hemisphere stroke. We pulled together data from 17 measures of language-related performance for 99 participants, each of those participants was also........ Read more »

Mirman, D., Chen, Q., Zhang, Y., Wang, Z., Faseyitan, O.K., Coslett, H.B., & Schwartz, M.F. (2015) Neural Organization of Spoken Language Revealed by Lesion-Symptom Mapping. Nature Communications, 6(6762), 1-9. info:/

  • March 3, 2015
  • 10:44 AM
  • 855 views

When lexical competition becomes lexical cooperation

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

Lexical neighborhood effects are one of the most robust findings in spoken word recognition: words with many similar-sounding words ("neighbors") are recognized more slowly and less accurately than words with few neighbors. About 10 years ago, when I was just starting my post-doc training with Jim Magnuson, we wondered about semantic neighborhood effects. We found that things were less straightforward in semantics: near semantic neighbors slowed down visual word recognition, but distant semantic........ Read more »

  • November 18, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,150 views

This Is Your TV On Drugs

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

There are more than 100 drug commercials on TV every hour of every day. Why? Because they work. Research shows that advertised drugs are prescribed 9x more than comparable drugs that aren’t advertised. And all those side effect notices? The drug companies like them because research says that all you remember is that they were “honest” with you.... Read more »

  • October 20, 2014
  • 04:21 PM
  • 1,605 views

Moral Time: Does Our Internal Clock Influence Moral Judgments?

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Does morality depend on the time of the day? The study "The Morning Morality Effect: The Influence of Time of Day on Unethical Behavior" published in October of 2013 by Maryam Kouchaki and Isaac Smith suggested that people are more honest in the mornings, and that their ability to resist the temptation of lying and cheating wears off as the day progresses. In a series of experiments, Kouchaki and Smith found that moral awareness and self-control in their study subjects decreased in the........ Read more »

  • October 13, 2014
  • 07:59 AM
  • 1,464 views

The Psychology of Procrastination: How We Create Categories of the Future

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

A fully rational approach to task completion would involve creating a priority list of tasks based on a composite score of task importance and the remaining time until the deadline. The most important task with the most proximate deadline would have to be tackled first, and the lowest priority task with the furthest deadline last. This sounds great in theory, but it is quite difficult to implement. A substantial amount of research has been conducted to understand how our moods, distractability a........ Read more »

  • June 5, 2014
  • 12:30 AM
  • 1,044 views

Mindfulness For Kids – Is It A Good Idea?

by Pranita Sohony in Workout Trends

“Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, How I wonder what you are? Up above the diamond….the world…sky….” [Long Pause] [Sobbing] [Curtains close] And your child comes running to you only to hug you and cry incessantly, leaving you disappointed. Are you sorry and lost? Would this have made you happy…? Alternate scenario: “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, How […]
The post Mindfulness For Kids – Is It A Good Idea? appeared first on .
... Read more »

  • January 13, 2014
  • 08:49 PM
  • 1,100 views

Using Ultrasound to Boost Brain Performance

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists have demonstrated that ultrasound directed to a specific region of the brain can boost performance in sensory discrimination. Whales, bats, and even praying mantises use ultrasound as a sensory guidance system — and now a new study has found that ultrasound can modulate brain activity to heighten sensory perception … Read More →... Read more »

Wynn Legon, Tomokazu F Sato, Alexander Opitz, Jerel Mueller, Aaron Barbour, Amanda Williams, & William J Tyler. (2014) Transcranial focused ultrasound modulates the activity of primary somatosensory cortex in humans. Nature Neuroscience. info:/10.1038/nn.3620

  • December 9, 2013
  • 09:26 PM
  • 489 views

Language in developmental and acquired disorders

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

As I mentioned in an earlier post, last June I had the great pleasure and honor of participating in a discussion meeting on Language in Developmental and Acquired Disorders hosted by the Royal Society and organized by Dorothy Bishop, Kate Nation, and Karalyn Patterson. Among the many wonderful things about this meeting was that it brought together people who study similar kinds of language deficit issues but in very different populations -- children with developmental language deficits such as d........ Read more »

Mirman, D, & Britt, A. E. (2014) What we talk about when we talk about access deficits. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 369(1634). info:/

  • November 15, 2013
  • 08:30 AM
  • 2,254 views

Advancing Science Through the Use of “New Statistics”

by amikulak in Daily Observations

There are several steps that researchers can take to bolster the integrity of their work, but embracing the use of the “new statistics” of effect sizes, estimation, and meta-analysis is a particularly important one, argues psychological scientist Geoff Cumming of La Trobe University in Australia.... Read more »

  • October 21, 2013
  • 05:39 PM
  • 1,387 views

The mind is not a (digital) computer

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

The "mind as computer" has been a dominant and powerful metaphor in cognitive science at least since the middle of the 20th century. Throughout this time, many of us have chafed against this metaphor because it has a tendency to be taken too literally. Framing mental and neural processes in terms of computation or information processing can be extremely useful, but this approach can turn into the extremely misleading notion that our minds work kind of like our desktop or laptop computers. There ........ Read more »

McClelland JL, Mirman D, & Holt LL. (2006) Are there interactive processes in speech perception?. Trends in cognitive sciences, 10(8), 363-369. PMID: 16843037  

  • October 8, 2013
  • 04:27 AM
  • 1,016 views

Almost 80 years on, progress on operant and classical conditioning

by Björn Brembs in bjoern.brembs.blog

This year’s Winter Conference on Animal Learning and Behavior (WCALB) will be on one of my oldest and most central research projects, the commonalities and differences between operant and classical conditioning. I picked this project for my Diploma (Master’s) thesis […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...... Read more »

B. F. Skinner. (1935) Two Types of Conditioned Reflex and a Pseudo Type. The Journal of General Psychology, 12(1), 66-77. DOI: 10.1080/00221309.1935.9920088  

J. Konorski, & S. Miller. (1937) On Two Types of Conditioned Reflex. The Journal of General Psychology, 16(1), 264-272. DOI: 10.1080/00221309.1937.9917950  

J. Konorski, & S. Miller. (1937) Further Remarks on two Types of Conditioned Reflex. The Journal of General Psychology, 17(1), 405-407. DOI: 10.1080/00221309.1937.9918010  

  • September 18, 2013
  • 11:49 AM
  • 903 views

Demystifying the Genetic and Environmental Influences on Disordered Eating

by Tetyana in Science of Eating Disorders


Genetics play an important role in the development of eating disorders and disordered eating behaviours. To date, many (over 30!) twin studies have been done and all but two found significant genetic effects on the development of eating disorders and disordered eating. However, no methodology is without limitations and tentative conclusions become more convincing when the findings are confirmed using different experimental approaches.
Twin studies, while they offer many advantages, are n........ Read more »

Klump KL, Suisman JL, Burt SA, McGue M, & Iacono WG. (2009) Genetic and environmental influences on disordered eating: An adoption study. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 118(4), 797-805. PMID: 19899849  

  • July 15, 2013
  • 05:27 AM
  • 1,198 views

Does hot weather make you act like an idiot?

by Stuart Farrimond in Dr Stu's Science Blog

At the height of summer, tempers fray: drivers honk their horns and couples bicker in the car park. It’s a hot day and I’m in a rage because the person in front of me has decided to walk at a pace that would embarrass a very slow snail. With a mobility impairment. ‘GET OUT OF … Continue reading »... Read more »

Craig A. Anderson, Kathryn B. Anderson, Nancy Dorr, Kristina M. DeNeve, & Mindy Flanagan. (2000) Temperature and aggression. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 63-133. info:/

Holland RL, Sayers JA, Keatinge WR, Davis HM, & Peswani R. (1985) Effects of raised body temperature on reasoning, memory, and mood. Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), 59(6), 1823-7. PMID: 4077790  

  • June 21, 2013
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,071 views

Models are experiments

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

I spent last week at a two-part meeting on language in developmental and acquired disorders, hosted by the Royal Society. The organizers (Dorothy Bishop, Kate Nation, and Karalyn Patterson) devised a meeting structure that stimulated – and made room for – a lot of discussion and one of the major discussion topics throughout the meeting was computational modeling. A major highlight for me was David Plaut’s aphorism “Models are experiments”. The idea is that models are sometimes taken to........ Read more »

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