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  • May 29, 2017
  • 11:34 AM

Study suggests computational model to predict air pollution after a rocket launching

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

The study suggests a new approach to predict major atmospheric pollutants emissions after a Satellite Launch Vehicle (SLV) launching, using a weather/air quality computational model. Propellant combustion may release a huge amount of hydrogen chloride (HCl), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2) and particulate matter, posing risk to the environment. … Read More →... Read more »

  • May 26, 2017
  • 01:14 PM

How to find articles in open access – tips from my favorite nerd

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Scholarly communication available online, whether in journals or repositories, adds up to millions, and this figure grows every year. What browser efficient tools are available to researchers, librarians, students, and the like to find the open-access versions of the articles that interest them? … Read More →... Read more »

  • May 22, 2017
  • 09:37 AM

Meteorological Tsunamis: should we worry about them?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

Have you ever heard about meteorological tsunamis? Why it should be important to better understand these natural phenomena? Dr. Iael Perez and Dr. Dragani Walter from the Servicio de Hidrografia - CONICET, Argentina, explain these phenomena in detail after investing on an interesting study conducted in Mar del Plata. … Read More →... Read more »

  • May 10, 2017
  • 05:29 PM

Gender disparities in science persist despite significant advances

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The participation of women as authors in academic publications has been increasing significantly worldwide and in all areas of knowledge, reaching 49% in Brazil and Portugal, followed by Australia (44%) and the European Union (41%). Gender equity in science, however, still has a long way to go, especially in the editing and peer review functions. A study of more than 41,000 articles published between 2007 and 2015 shows that male editors - who are majority - preferentially select same gender referees. … Read More →... Read more »

Markus Helmer, Manuel Schottdorf, Andreas Neef, & Demian Battaglia. (2017) Gender bias in scholarly peer review. eLife. DOI: 10.7554/eLife.21718.001  

Lerback, J., & Hanson, B. (2017) Journals invite too few women to referee. Nature, 541(7638), 455-457. DOI: 10.1038/541455a  

  • May 8, 2017
  • 02:25 PM

Health systems in Brazil and regionalization policies

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

There is currently a crucial moment in the implementation of the Unified Health System (SUS), since its performance is questioned on all sides, in general, magnifying a superficial view of its failures and denying many of its successes. … Read More →... Read more »

  • May 2, 2017
  • 11:20 AM

Openness is the only quality of an academic article that can be objectively measured

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Quality of scientific research articles is a widespread preoccupation in academic circles. The most used proxy is based on citation counts, not of the article itself, but of the averages of articles appearing in the same journal during a given time window. This is known as the Journal Impact Factor, which may be objective within its own definition, but utterly lacks objectivity with regard to scientific quality of individual articles. Only some technical qualities of articles can be assessed at the time of their publication, and, significantly, their openness, the degree to which the research results they describe can be immediately and universally shared. … Read More →... Read more »

  • April 25, 2017
  • 02:46 PM

Editors of Brazilian journals – a hard life that is getting harder! [Originally published as the editorial in Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências vol. 89 no. 1]

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The financing of journals of Brazil can be improved by extending the validity period of research grants, in order to allow publishers a better plan for articles publication. An editorial written by Alexander Kellner in the first issue of 2017 of Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências examines the challenge faced by editors of journals of Brazil and highlights their hard work in attracting relevant manuscripts, seeking to achieve ever greater levels of excellence and internationalization. … Read More →... Read more »

CORDEIRO, Y., & SCHUCK, P. (2015) Hot Topics in Biomedical Sciences. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, 87(2), 1271-1272. DOI: 10.1590/0001-376520158722  

Vasconcelos, S., Sorenson, M., Watanabe, E., Foguel, D., & Palácios, M. (2015) Brazilian Science and Research Integrity: Where are We? What Next?. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, 87(2), 1259-1269. DOI: 10.1590/0001-3765201520150165  

  • April 17, 2017
  • 02:00 PM

The emergence of the alternative metric that can make the measurement of world academic production more fair and egalitarian

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

The growing use of social networks for various purposes, including the dissemination of scientific communication, has required the creation of a new method of measuring and analyzing the flow of information in these environments. Altmetria emerged as a subarea of Metrics Information Studies to meet this need, and can complement traditional methods of evaluation, thus making it more fair and egalitarian. … Read More →... Read more »

  • April 7, 2017
  • 04:02 PM

Outsourcing and precariousness of work in the social assistance policy

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

This paper presents the work conditions of psychologists hired by private organizations to work at the Sistema Único de Assistência Social (Unified System for Social Assistance). Among other things, it concludes that this “outsourcing” process has been allowing temporary contracts, high turnover rates, late payment of salaries, dismissal of large groups of employees and lack of continuing education, which impacts the health of the workers and the quality of the services offered. … Read More →... Read more »

  • April 7, 2017
  • 03:18 PM

Are we in the GSM Radar?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Google Scholar Metrics (GSM) offers alternative metrics to the JCR Impact Factor and the SJR, namely the h-5 index. To enter this world ranking that covers more than 40,000 journals it is only necessary to publish an average of 20 articles per year and be cited. However, there are hundreds of journals (our journals) that are not being indexed in GSM. They're off Radar. … Read More →... Read more »

Enrique Ordua-Malea, Alberto Martín-Martín, Juan M. Ayllón, & Emilio Delgado López Cozar. (2016) La revolución Google Scholar: destapando la caja de Pandora académica. Universidad de Granada. info:/

  • April 3, 2017
  • 02:00 PM

Medical practice precariousness at the Unified Health System — SUS

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

The medical practice in the Unified Health System is a study topic published in the journal Estudos de Psicologia (Campinas), which reveals the working conditions of these professionals and the impacts on personal health, analyzed through interviews and self-confidence. … Read More →... Read more »

  • March 31, 2017
  • 06:07 PM

I wrote this… I did not write this… now I write something else…

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The emerging system of online scholarly communication incorporates a technological and ideologically approach different from the traditional one, where the articles initially appear as preprints versions and are modified until reaching the final version. In case of errors, these same technologies provide efficient opportunities to make partial or total corrections and even retractions, associating to the path of a document the history of its versions. It is time, therefore, to establish methodologies that allow to obtain the maximum of more updated information to support the scientific undertakings. … Read More →... Read more »

  • March 27, 2017
  • 04:12 PM

Pregnant women modify the labor progress when use warm bath and Swiss ball

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

Research demonstrates the use of warm shower and perineal exercises with Swiss ball alone or combined during labor improves fetal well-being, stimulates uterine contractions, reduces labor time and accelerates progression to outcome in normal birth. … Read More →... Read more »

  • March 26, 2017
  • 09:27 AM

Multilingual neuromyths

by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira in Being Multilingual

P { margin-bottom: 0.08in; } Neuromyths are misconceptions about how the brain works. They are the topic of the Nature Neuroscience editorial The mythical brain, which highlights that they are as false as they are appealing, and that their appeal is what explains their resilience.Appealing seems to be the key word here, in its sense of ‘engaging’ with little or no rational engagement. Deena Skolnick Weisberg and colleagues showed this in The seductive allure of neuroscience explanations: when asked to choose between alternative nonsensical explanations of the same brain function, their informants systematically preferred the ones containing “logically irrelevant neuroscience information”. The mere mention of intimidating concepts like brain or neurology appears to lend credibility to any statement where they appear, in other words. Statements about the so-called ‘bilingual/multilingual brain’ are no exception, in the wake of the current exponential growth of academic and media news about brains and neuro-prefixed things. This growth reflects a shift in our ways of thinking about our brain along the past couple of decades. Late last century’s trends modelled the brain on the most sophisticated information gathering and processing device of the time, the computer. Since models naturally constrain our ways of thinking about what we’re modelling, our views of the brain came complete with computer-bound characteristics: brain space got allocated once and for all, and brains developed one way, towards decay. Related neuromyths had it that more than one language takes up brain space, or that aged brains lose language learning abilities. Early 21st century findings then spelled the death of brain death myths: ageing, which is what the brain and the rest of our bodies do from the moment we’re born, doesn’t entail brain decay. Brains were all but static, degenerative, limited-capacity CPUs: neural structures and functions evolve and regenerate themselves after all, in response to our experiences and needs, and both young and old brains retain the agility to do so. Brain plasticity duly became the new mantra and, not least, we could capture brains in action through imaging, our latest model. Related neuromyths have it that we now know what’s going on because we can see it, as Leonid Rozenblit and Frank Keil argue in The misunderstood limits of folk science: an illusion of explanatory depth. They show first, that we are experts at fooling ourselves that we “understand complex phenomena with far greater precision, coherence, and depth” than we actually do, and second, that “The illusion for explanatory knowledge is most robust where the environment supports real-time explanations with visible mechanisms.”Image © Thomas Schultz (Wikimedia Commons)Likewise, in What can functional neuroimaging tell the experimental psychologist?, Richard Henson warns us of the “real danger that pictures of blobs on brains seduce one into thinking that we can now directly observe psychological processes”. Blob-based evidence nevertheless continues to flourish, all the way from forensics, as Richard K. Sherwin observes in Visual jurisprudence, to education, as Sanne Dekker and colleagues show in Neuromyths in education: Prevalence and predictors of misconceptions among teachers or Paul A. Howard-Jones shows in Neuroscience and education: myths and messages. The seductive appeal of visual animations is irresistible, in sum, and it naturally sells very well, which is the topic of Diane M. Beck’s study The appeal of the brain in the popular press. But there are two problems. One is that the seduction is selective. Is it true, for example, that there is a bilingual/multilingual ‘advantage’, which may include inhibition of brain deterioration? Ellen Bialystok and colleagues say yes in Bilingualism, aging, and cognitive control: Evidence from the Simon Task, Shanna Kousaie and Natalie A. Phillips say no in Ageing and bilingualism: Absence of a “bilingual advantage” in Stroop interference in a nonimmigrant sample, and J. Bruce Morton and Sarah N. Harper, in What did Simon say? Revisiting the bilingual advantage, reserve judgement about whether multilingualism relates to brain performance at all until we understand what is really causing what. Meanwhile, Angela de Bruin and colleagues, in Cognitive Advantage in Bilingualism. An Example of Publication Bias?, conducted a meta-analysis of studies published between 1999 and 2012 on the so-called ‘bilingual advantage’, to conclude that the advantage may well lie in cherry-picking of findings. A recent issue of the Applied Psycholinguistics journal, dedicated to Bilingualism and neuroplasticity, reviews what (little) we know about this topic, but the myth that multilingualism is ‘good for your brain’ goes on making headlines: it’s simply too appealing to not be true. Apparently, it doesn’t sell to popularise research finding that multilingual brains may be as exciting as monolingual ones – which I, for one, find extremely appealing. The other problem is that academic and media reports don’t speak the same language. Media headlines stating that multilingualism “keeps the brain young” or that you should learn a new language in order to “boost your brain power”, though claiming to draw on scientific research on languages and brains, in fact misrepresent actual findings to go on feeding current neuromyths. In my academic courses, in one of the assignments that became most popular among students, I had them search for wow! media headlines about multilingualism, retrieve the original studies quoted in those pieces, and assess matches between headline and content of the piece, on the one hand, and content of the piece and the studies, on the other. Expectedly, very few matches were found. And unfortunately, given that academic publications aren’t regularly made available outside of academia, very few of us are able to judge for ourselves spin cycles and hype of this kind. Simple repetition of appealing myths doesn’t turn them into facts.Keeping (somewhat) to the topic of what we like to believe, my next post departs from the adult world to check out how children look at their own multilingualism. ... Read more »

Beck, D. (2010) The Appeal of the Brain in the Popular Press. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 5(6), 762-766. DOI: 10.1177/1745691610388779  

  • March 24, 2017
  • 02:00 PM

Lines that do not meet? Different perspectives of psychology upon organizations and work

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

Is it possible to attach a single label to the different approaches and professional practices of Psychology regarding work? Are there irreconcilable differences between psychology approaches, for example, an approach with a concentrated focus on management and another focused on the health of workers? … Read More →... Read more »

  • March 22, 2017
  • 03:37 PM

Study shows that malocclusion has a negative impact on adolescents’ quality of life

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

A study carried out at Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) has shown that malocclusion (badly positioned teeth) may affect adolescents’ quality of life in a negative way. According to what was reported by parents and caregivers, youngsters with more serious alterations show more impaired aspects of emotional and social well-being than individuals without alterations or with minor ones. … Read More →... Read more »

  • March 21, 2017
  • 02:00 PM

Study proposes fruition as a new attribute of information representation for works of contemporary art

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

It discusses information and art starting from the books of artists, from the collection of the Núcleo de Arte Contemporânea da Paraíba (NAC/UFPB), analyzing the performance of CI through the representation of information, in a collaborative working relationship between professionals. The representation of information could help in the treatment and organization of information, softening the complexity of these objects in the face of their possibilities of abstraction and fruition. … Read More →... Read more »

  • March 21, 2017
  • 09:20 AM

On the impact of blogging — or how far does my message mix?

by Mirjam Sophia Glessmer in Adventures in Oceanography and Teaching

What is the impact of this blog? And who am I writing it for? Those are not questions I regularly ask myself. The main reason I started blogging was to organise all the interesting stuff I was collecting for my introduction to oceanography lecture at the University of Bergen in one place, so I would…... Read more »

  • March 20, 2017
  • 02:00 PM

Research analyzes use of TRS in organizational studies

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

Bibliometric research analyzes the use of Social Representation Theory (SRT) in Organizational Studies (OS). We investigated 90 papers published in journals and scientific events from 2001 to 2014. The results indicate that the use of SRT in OS is incipient, superficial and presents theoretical and methodological inconsistencies. … Read More →... Read more »

  • March 14, 2017
  • 02:30 PM

Internationalization as an indicator of journal performance in Brazil: the case of Psychology

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The path to strengthening scientific publications almost always goes through internationalization. Publishing in English, however, is not enough to reach a truly global audience and indices comparable to the most prestigious journals. A study on the degree of internationalization of Brazilian psychology journals shows how to walk this path. … Read More →... Read more »

Gamba, E., Packer, A., & Meneghini, R. (2015) Pathways to Internationalize Brazilian Journals of Psychology. Psicologia: Reflexão e Crítica, 66-71. DOI: 10.1590/1678-7153.20152840010  

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