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  • October 1, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,137 views

Admissibility of brain scans in criminal trials

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

It’s been a while since we’ve done an update on neurolaw issues and we think you’ll want to read the entire article upon which this post is based. The article is published in Court Review: Journal of the American Judges Association (which is probably a journal you would benefit from perusing regularly). The article (authored […]

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Confused about brain scans? Welcome to the club!
On brains, brain damage, pedophilia and other things we don’t like
Defending the Psychop........ Read more »

Rushing, SE. (2014) The admissibility of brain scans in criminal trials: The case of positron emission tomography. . Court Review, 50(2). info:/

  • September 29, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 903 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Should you consider 3-D for your courtroom videos?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Evidence admissibility issues aside, the answer is, “only if you can do it as well as they did in the 3D movie Polar Express”. As it turns out, 3D isn’t that much more impactful than 2D unless it’s done really, really well. Psychologists and neuroscientists studying emotion often use film clips for their research. So […]

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Simple Jury Persuasion: When videos are too persuasive…
Simple Jury Persuasion: Be Powerful in the Courtroom
Simple Jury Persuasion: Is tha........ Read more »

Bride DL, Crowell SE, Baucom BR, Kaufman EA, O'Connor CG, Skidmore CR, & Yaptangco M. (2014) Testing the Effectiveness of 3D Film for Laboratory-Based Studies of Emotion. PLoS ONE, 9(8). PMID: 25170878  

  • September 26, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 667 views

Would you prefer a smaller government? Actually, no you would not. 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

For a number of years now, we have been asking our mock jurors what role they think government should play in our society and giving them a number of options among which to choose. Most of them say government should play a smaller role and we certainly have all heard the media messages that tell us […]

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“Just about always” and “Never” responses to trusting the federal government
Men prefer boxes and women prefer ellipses?
You might be a conservative if…you p........ Read more »

  • September 24, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 833 views

Unfaithful partner? Would you rather be seen as mature– or as competent and strong?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

According to new research, you can’t have both. Inspired by women who told them they “would not vote for Hillary Clinton [in the Presidential primaries a decade later] because she forgave then-President Bill Clinton’s infidelity”, these researchers looked at how male and female observers viewed male and female victims of infidelity based on how they […]

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How leaders look: Competent and trustworthy, but not dominant
Is it best to be competent, warm, or moral?
You wa........ Read more »

  • September 21, 2014
  • 10:43 PM
  • 1,130 views

The Short Story of Self-Control for Lawyers

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Juries hear the phrase “Excuse me, objection your Honor  . . . .”, or some other form, often not as polite, frequently during trials.  Due to TV and the movies, American jurors probably expect to hear the courtroom gladiator scream “I object . . . . !”   Alternatively, some lawyers ponder the dynamic flow [...]
The post The Short Story of Self-Control for Lawyers appeared first on Psycholawlogy.
... Read more »

Inzlicht, M., Legault, L., & Teper, R. (2014) Exploring the Mechanisms of Self-Control Improvement. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23(4), 302-307. DOI: 10.1177/0963721414534256  

  • September 17, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 742 views

The Disgust Scale: How have we missed this all this time?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We’ve covered a lot of the disgust research so it is curious to us that somehow we missed sharing the actual Disgust Scale with you earlier. The Disgust Scale was developed by the infamous Jonathan Haidt (his surname is pronounced “height”) back in 1994 before disgust was considered cool. In brief, the Disgust Scale was […]

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Disgust and lost confidence in our institutions
Simple Jury Persuasion: Anger + Disgust = Moral Outrage
Choosing to either disgust your jurors o........ Read more »

Olatunji, B. O., Haidt, J., McKay, D., David, B. (2008) Core, animal reminder, and contamination disgust: Three kinds of disgust with distinct personality, behavioral, physiological, and clinical correlates. Journal of Research in Personality, 1243-1259. info:/

  • September 15, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 888 views

“Smart people ask for (my) advice!”

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We are often wary of asking for advice for fear of looking dumb or appearing incompetent. Oddly enough, our fears may be unfounded based on some new research out of Harvard Business School. According to the researchers, asking for advice does not make you appear either dumb or incompetent. Instead, asking for advice makes you […]

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News Flash: Gay people are different than straight people
Name that gadget, widget, or otherwise smart device!
When you wear glasses you are les........ Read more »

Brooks, AW, Gino, F, & Schweitzer, ME. (2014) Smart people ask for (my) advice: Seeking advice boosts perceptions of competence. . Harvard Business School Working Papers. info:/

  • September 15, 2014
  • 01:00 AM
  • 1,026 views

Emotional Intelligence Memo to Management: EI as a Buffer of [Lawyer] Stress in the Developmental Job Experience

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Emotional intelligence, according to recent leading edge research, can buffer negative emotional experiences associated with on-the-job learning assignments used by 0rganizations to enhance their stock of human capital.  For an organization to get ahead of the competition, its members perform at higher levels.  This means that the workers who take their skillset to the [...]
The post Emotional Intelligence Memo to Management: EI as a Buffer of [Lawyer] Stress in the Developmental Job Experien........ Read more »

  • September 9, 2014
  • 12:53 AM
  • 1,026 views

The “A,B,Cs” of Interests and How You [Lawyers] Can Know Them

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

You [lawyers] have interests.  Interests provide us potent motivation for goal-oriented behavior.  We should not ignore them because interests, a very important individual difference trait variable, “are powerful predictors of educational and career choice, performance, and success”.  A recent review of psychological science literature by leading scholars provides a concise summary of current knowledge [...]
The post The “A,B,Cs” of Interests and How You [Lawyers] Can Know The........ Read more »

Rounds, J., & Su, R. (2014) The Nature and Power of Interests. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23(2), 98-103. DOI: 10.1177/0963721414522812  

  • September 8, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 868 views

Does Face-to-Face Interaction Promote Honesty?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

I listen to a lot of audiobooks while traveling. But sometimes I want something less lengthy than a full book and so I turn to podcasts. Recently, I was on a plane and turned on an episode of the NPR TED Radio Hour podcast on Why We Lie. It’s an interesting and wide-ranging look at […]

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Never trust a man with a wide face
I can tell from your face that you are suicidal
A law firm’s financial success & the managing partners’ face


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  • September 5, 2014
  • 12:34 AM
  • 1,120 views

Brief Mindfulness Meditation Primer for Lawyers

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Can lawyers learn about its distinct components, and practice a process which involves interrelated components of attention regulation, body awareness, emotion regulation, and change in perspective on the self, and reach higher levels of self-compassion and well-being?  Stated another way, the question asks  “Can lawyers learn and practice mindfulness meditation?”  The short answer is [...]
The post Brief Mindfulness Meditation Primer for Lawyers appeared first on Psycholawlogy.
... Read more »

  • September 3, 2014
  • 08:01 AM
  • 1,081 views

The Kanisza Triangle: You Can’t Believe Your Eyes

by Rebecca A. Zarate in United Academics

How does the brain decide what the larger, gestalt picture is? From this demonstration, Kok and De Lange concluded it is “an interactive process between higher-order visual areas and V1, wherein activity in V1 is modulated in a highly specific way according to the perceptual hypothesis provided by higher-order areas.” In essence, higher areas of the brain (top-down processes) are making gestalt type guesses, expectations, and assumptions that affect what your senses perceive... Read more »

  • September 3, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 726 views

“S/he is just not one of us…”

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Just over a year ago, The Jury Expert published an article on bias and ambiguity in times of economic stress. The article was titled Does This Recession Make Me Look Black? –and it focused on how White Americans see racially ambiguous appearing others as in-group members until times are tough and then we see them […]

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Excuse me while I slip into something more Caucasian
Is there a relationship between age and ethnic prejudice?
Nice guys really do finish last! (Or at ........ Read more »

Kteily, N, Cotterill, S, Sidanius, J, Sheehy-Skeffington, J, & Bergh, R. (2014) “Not one of us”: Predictors and consequences of denying in-group characteristics to ambiguous targets. . Personality . info:/

  • September 1, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 731 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: “The defendant is just an animal!” 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s a pretty simple way for Prosecutors to motivate jurors to lock up a Defendant and throw away the key. It’s all about language. There are words you can use to evoke a more negative (animalistic) sense of the Defendant and there are words that, while still describing egregious behavior, are more neutrally descriptive. The […]

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Simple Jury Persuasion: Activate the ‘intuitive prosecutor’
Simple Jury Persuasion: Decreasing victim condemnation in sexual harassment ........ Read more »

Vasquez, EA, Loughnan, S, Gootjes-Dreesbach, E, & Weger, U. (2014) The animal in you: Animalistic descriptions of a violent crime increase punishment of perpetrator. . Aggressive Behavior, 337-344. info:/

  • August 28, 2014
  • 01:02 AM
  • 740 views

Tandem Emotional Intelligence and Protection Against [Lawyer] Depression

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy


Emotional intelligence relates to individual differences in how we perceive, communicate, regulate, and understand emotions, both our own and those of others.  Two forms of emotional intelligence, ability [maximum performance] and trait [typical performance], combine and work in tandem to influence psychological adaptation.  Researchers recently investigated the “tandem” concept, and broke new ground [...]
The post Tandem Emotional Intelligence and Protection Against [Lawyer] Depression a........ Read more »

Davis, S., & Humphrey, N. (2014) Ability Versus Trait Emotional Intelligence. Journal of Individual Differences, 35(1), 54-62. DOI: 10.1027/1614-0001/a000127  

  • August 27, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,170 views

Just how diverse is this group, really?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We often make assumptions when discussing diversity that we all perceive a group’s diversity in the same way. Today’s research shows that simply isn’t so. That is, you and I (depending on our racial in-group) can look at the same group and you might say it is diverse while I say it is not. What […]

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Improving working relationships in your ethnically diverse jury
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Proof we don’t hire the most qualified candid........ Read more »

  • August 25, 2014
  • 12:02 PM
  • 1,036 views

Spoiler Alert!: Are You Wasting Your Time Avoiding Spoilers?

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

Lately I have been cranking though a lot of media – TV, movies, books, podcasts, etc. To the point that I start to wonder how I have time for actual life. During this mass consumption of media, I've been thinking about, and discussing with friends, the topic of spoilers. Bring up this topic with just about anyone and you’ll find that it’s actually a pretty controversial one. As for me, I fall in the no spoilers category. Spoil one of my beloved TV shows and you will go from friend to “fr........ Read more »

Leavitt, J., & Christenfeld, N. (2011) Story Spoilers Don't Spoil Stories. Psychological Science, 22(9), 1152-1154. DOI: 10.1177/0956797611417007  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 872 views

Women are easily misled so why not lie to them in negotiations?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Back in 2012, we wrote about which gender was the more moral in negotiations. (Spoiler alert: it was women.) Now we have a new article on why women get lied to in negotiations. Not when or if–but why. Basically, people believe women are more easily misled than men and people believe women to be less […]

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Which is the more moral negotiator? The male or the female?
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Negotiations: Starting high and ending with nothing


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Kray, LJ, Kennedy, JA, & Van Zant, AB. (2014) Not competent enough to know the difference? Gender stereotypes about women’s ease of being misled predict negotiator deception. . Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. info:/

  • August 22, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,140 views

RIP Demographics? Well, probably not…

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve just published a new article in The Jury Expert that “should” signal the death of the simplistic use of demographics in voir dire and jury selection. Will it? Not likely. Partly this is the fault of courts that are becoming increasingly restrictive of time and the scope of questions posed to jurors. If litigants cannot ask substantive […]

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Douglas L. Keene, & Rita R. Handrich. (2014) Demographic Roulette: What Was Once a Bad Idea Has Gotten Worse. The Jury Expert, 26(3.). info:/

  • August 20, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,056 views

Be still my heart: A short (one-item!) measure of narcissism? 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We are all about short measures of psychological constructs. You might say watching the development of various scales is a hobby here (just look at all these posts!). With rare exception, courts don’t permit lengthy questionnaires, or questions that sound like a psychological screening test. So when the Neuroskeptic blogged about a new one-item scale […]

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The GASP scale: A new measure of guilt and shame proneness
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