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  • January 16, 2017
  • 09:52 AM
  • 253 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Using your expert  witnesses’ hands help persuade jurors

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

You may have seen our blog post where we talk about research that informs us in patent work to either allow jurors to examine a disputed invention up close or to simply have them view it from a distance. Which strategy we recommend you use all depends on the evidence and your specific case. Today, […]... Read more »

Vallée-Tourangeau F, Steffensen SV, Vallée-Tourangeau G, & Sirota M. (2016) Insight with hands and things. Acta Psychologica, 195-205. PMID: 27569687  

  • January 13, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 236 views

Internet commenters, crying men, psychiatrists on trial, and good  bosses

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It is still so early in 2017 and yet, it is time for another installation of tidbits, miscellany, odds and ends, and accumulated wisdom with which you can amaze your friends and impress family members. And that we don’t want to just toss disrespectfully into recycling when it could bring so much joy to your […]... Read more »

  • January 9, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 292 views

 Tattoo you—On attraction, impulsivity, pathology, and trustworthiness

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Here’s an update on the stash of tattoo posts we have here. This is a collection of new research on tattoos (to make sure we are up to date) that will undoubtedly help you decide what your individual ink means/will mean, and of course, what it suggests about your jurors, your clients, your kids, and […]... Read more »

  • January 6, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 249 views

White collar criminals, bad presentations, smartphones, and a salary  negotiation edge

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It is very cold outdoors (even in Texas) and it is time once again for a number of important things we decided did not merit an entire post but wanted to share. Think of it as a series of holiday gifts for you… Ever wonder why white-collar criminals did what they did?  Wonder no more. […]... Read more »

Shaw, H., Ellis, D., Kendrick, L., Ziegler, F., & Wiseman, R. (2016) Predicting Smartphone Operating System from Personality and Individual Differences. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 19(12), 727-732. DOI: 10.1089/cyber.2016.0324  

  • January 4, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 286 views

“It’s chilling” says lead author: Discrimination self-reports up  for Latinos 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We’ve seen the reports of hate crimes skyrocketing—both in general, and specifically for Muslims. Now a new report says the self-reports of discrimination from Latinos have doubled in the past decade. The study used data from the National Latino Health Care Survey (a telephone survey of 800 Latino adults completed in 2013). The lead author […]... Read more »

  • December 19, 2016
  • 08:43 AM
  • 377 views

I am morally superior to others and also less biased than  everyone….

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

While you may think you have heard this line recently, this is really (based on new research) what most of us think about ourselves. It is called the “better than average effect” and it is very persistent. We might smirk at politicians who actually say things like this aloud, but that’s only because we tend […]... Read more »

  • December 16, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 379 views

Power poses: It was such a nice idea but it  cannot be replicated (so far)

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Last week the Shark Tank television show was apparently shown during a time my DVR was trying to record another show for me. As I watched it, I was amused to see a couple of entrepreneurs whispering to each other to do “power poses” before they pitched to the shark-investors. I was amused, because I’d […]... Read more »

Bartlett, T. (2016) Power Poser: When big ideas go bad. Chronicle of Higher Education. info:/

  • December 12, 2016
  • 10:43 AM
  • 368 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Why you don’t want your  trial videos to elicit awe from jurors 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

While you don’t want jurors to think your visual evidence was made by poorly trained technicians—here’s a study that tells us something counter-intuitive that you may find useful (we have). It may not make obvious sense, but you also don’t want jurors to be blown away (i.e., awed, in wonder, overwhelmed by the majesty of […]

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Simple Jury Persuasion: Educating jurors about science may have no effect
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Simple Jury Pe........ Read more »

Farias M, Newheiser AK, Kahane G, & de Toledo Z. (2013) Scientific faith: Belief in science increases in the face of stress and existential anxiety. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 49(6), 1210-1213. PMID: 24187384  

  • December 6, 2016
  • 08:46 AM
  • 344 views

Are American Professors More Responsive to Requests Made by White Male Students?

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

The vast majority of professors will gladly meet a prospective graduate student and discuss research opportunities as well as long-term career options, especially if the student requesting the meeting clarifies the goal of the meeting. However, there are cases when students wait in vain for a response. Is it because their email never reached the professor because it got lost in the internet ether or a spam folder? Was the professor simply too busy to respond? A research study headed by Katherine........ Read more »

  • December 2, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 192 views

Should I trust you? Let me see your face… 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

If you try to identify what it is that makes someone trustworthy, you might list their forthrightness, values consistent with your own, or even their willingness to embrace unpopular positions. And that is all well and good but it likely is untrue. Instead, researchers tell us, we draw “relatively stable trustworthinesss impressions from facial appearance”. […]

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Your face can get you killed… 
Never trust a man with a wide face
You can tell a lot from looking at some........ Read more »

Klapper, A., Dotsch, R., van Rooij, I., & Wigboldus, D. (2016) Do we spontaneously form stable trustworthiness impressions from facial appearance?. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 111(5), 655-664. DOI: 10.1037/pspa0000062  

  • November 28, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 270 views

It’s late in 2016 and we still neither like nor trust atheists

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve written about atheists here (and how unpopular they are in North America) a number of times. The first time was in 2010 when we wrote an article in The Jury Expert because we were so taken aback by the level of vitriol we’d seen in a blog post describing a new research article on […]

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Everything you ever wanted to know about atheists  (the 2016 update)
An update on disrupting suspicion of atheists
Everyone knows you just can’t trust an atheist!


... Read more »

  • November 18, 2016
  • 11:00 AM
  • 535 views

Imagine: Listening to Songs Which Make Us More Generous

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

It does not come as a surprise that background music in a café helps create the ambience and affects how much customers enjoy sipping their cappuccinos. But recent research suggests that the choice of lyrics can even impact the social behavior of customers. The researcher Nicolas Ruth and his colleagues from the University of Würzburg (Bavaria, Germany) assembled a playlist of 18 songs with pro-social lyrics which they had curated by surveying 74 participants in an online questionnaire as to w........ Read more »

  • November 16, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 213 views

Beards, designing in discrimination, assertion for women, and the exhausting process of helping  

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

You are not seeing double. Over the last month we’ve kept reading and reading and reading but many of the articles we read for the blog were fun but just not substantive enough for a full blog post. So. Think of this as the director’s cut version of the blog—full of things you wish we’d […]

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Science knowledge, objectifying women, earning  power, and social media colors
Spiders, dogs, assassins, beards and the demons  of sleep paralysis (things you want to know........ Read more »

  • November 10, 2016
  • 11:55 AM
  • 348 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: When does your client need to go  beyond apology?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Gender stereotypes are powerful things and when your client has broken gender stereotypes and broken trust with others, they need to go beyond mere apology. First, a bit about what gender stereotypes are: Women are expected to be benevolent and concerned about others while men are expected to be confident, competitive and independent. Go against […]

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Simple Jury Persuasion: When your Muslim female client wears a head-covering
Simple Jury Persuasion: “I transgressed. Pleas........ Read more »

Frawley, S., & Harrison, J. (2016) A social role perspective on trust repair. Journal of Management Development, 35(8), 1045-1055. DOI: 10.1108/JMD-10-2015-0149  

  • November 9, 2016
  • 06:09 PM
  • 362 views

Lower Social Status Causes Less Social Contact and More Depression in Uni Students

by Mark Rubin in Mark Rubin's Social Psychology Research Blog

A person’s subjective social status reflects how they rank themselves relative to others in their community. Social status can be considered to be a psychological dimension of social class and socioeconomic status, and it has been shown to be positively related to mental health: The higher one’s perceived social status, the better one’s mental health. However, the process underlying this relation is unclear. In some recent research, my colleagues and I considered social contact........ Read more »

  • November 7, 2016
  • 12:30 AM
  • 416 views

What The Future Will Hold

by Aurametrix team in Aurametrix Blog

Elections are bad for your health. More than half of Americans, independently of their party preference, are stressed about upcoming elections, especially the oldest and the youngest voters. Social media is one of the major factors making this stress even worse. ​... Read more »

Waismel-Manor I, Ifergane G, & Cohen H. (2011) When endocrinology and democracy collide: emotions, cortisol and voting at national elections. European neuropsychopharmacology : the journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 21(11), 789-95. PMID: 21482457  

Neiman J, Giuseffi K, Smith K, French J, Waismel-Manor I, & Hibbing J. (2015) Voting at Home Is Associated with Lower Cortisol than Voting at the Polls. PloS one, 10(9). PMID: 26335591  

  • October 30, 2016
  • 12:44 PM
  • 331 views

How to dismantle the web of lies

by Sergio Graziosi in Writing my own user manual - Sergio Graziosi's Blog

In the previous post, I’ve concluded, with Ben Walters, that we need to “make art that wins hearts and arguments that win minds“. The aim is to contrast the rise of populism, or, following the current slang, fight against post-fact…Read more ›... Read more »

Fernbach, P., Rogers, T., Fox, C., & Sloman, S. (2013) Political Extremism Is Supported by an Illusion of Understanding. Psychological Science, 24(6), 939-946. DOI: 10.1177/0956797612464058  

Tuller, HM., Bryan, CJ., Heyman, GD., & Christenfeld, NJS Volume 59, July 2015, Pages 18–23. (2015) Seeing the other side: Perspective taking and the moderation of extremity. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 18-23. info:/10.1016/j.jesp.2015.02.003

  • October 28, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 358 views

Choosing your jurors: On bias, curiosity and  wisdom

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Earlier this week, we wrote on the question of whether those who have a higher score on the Need for Cognition Scale are just lazy (and the answer was no, not really). If you read this blog regularly, you know that bias is where we work and focus. We also like a curious juror (sometimes) […]

Related posts:
Uncommon Wisdom: Lessons from Patent and IP  Mock Jurors
Choosing to either disgust your jurors or tick them off
Choosing science over beliefs: Frequency of dog bites and feelings of........ Read more »

Kahn, Landrum, Carpenter, Helft, & Jameson. (2016) Science curiosity and political information processing. . Advances in Political Psychology. info:/

  • October 26, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 388 views

Are spouse killers “wicked” or  “stressed”?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

While it may be 2016, there are still some judges who view women and men differently even when they commit the same offense. When it comes to killing your spouse—apparently, the difference lies in the gender of the defendant. Australian researchers looked at the sentencing remarks from nine different judges from trials involving men killing […]

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Does race make a difference in how jurors perceive  battered spouse syndrome cases?
Female serial killers: Who they are and how........ Read more »

  • October 24, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 341 views

Empathy, need for cognition, getting it right and hair  transplants

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It is yet another installment of things you want to know for voir dire, your personal appearance and choices, and how our country rates on caring for others. Sit back, educate yourself, and return to the fray with tidbits that will heighten your reputation among your co-workers for useful and inspirational pieces of information. “Need […]

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Empathy: Paving the road to preferential treatment with good intentions
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........ Read more »

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