Post List

All posts; Tags Include "Zoology"

(Modify Search »)

  • April 23, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,946 views

Two Species of Cottonmouths? This Scientist Says Yes!

by David Steen in Living Alongside Wildlife







0
false


18 pt
18 pt
0
0

false
false
false














/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
... Read more »

Burbrink, F. T., & Guiher, T. J. (2015) Considering gene flow when using coalescent methods to delimit lineages of North American pitvipers of the genus Agkistrodon. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 173(2), 505-526. info:/

  • April 21, 2015
  • 08:36 AM
  • 1,047 views

If only all science were this reproducible

by Björn Brembs in bjoern.brembs.blog

For our course this year I was planning a standard neurogenetic experiment. I hadn’t ever done this experiment in a course, yet, just two weeks ago I tried it once myself, with an N=1. The students would get two groups […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...... Read more »

Kaun, K., Riedl, C., Chakaborty-Chatterjee, M., Belay, A., Douglas, S., Gibbs, A., & Sokolowski, M. (2007) Natural variation in food acquisition mediated via a Drosophila cGMP-dependent protein kinase. Journal of Experimental Biology, 210(20), 3547-3558. DOI: 10.1242/​jeb.006924  

  • April 20, 2015
  • 04:35 AM
  • 760 views

Males Are Here To Stay: Sex Enhances Egg Production And Colony Fitness

by beredim in Strange Animals

To us humans, it seems extremely unnatural that other animals can reproduce without having sex. Yet with the passing of time, evolution has endowed females of several species of amphibians, insects, reptiles and fish the ability to asexually produce offsprings without "help" from males.



Now, researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) say that in ... Read more »

  • April 15, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 830 views

Boy Plants Are From Mars …..

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Darwin missed the boat on plants. He recognized sexual dimorphism and sexual selection in animals, but didn’t see the same thing in flowers. Boy plants can look, grow, smell or locate very different from female plants. And it matters – some beetles seek out boy plants for their smell and deliver pollen to girl plants as a bribe for letting them lay eggs there! They have learned to tell guy from gal.
... Read more »

Okamoto, T., Kawakita, A., Goto, R., Svensson, G., & Kato, M. (2013) Active pollination favours sexual dimorphism in floral scent. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 280(1772), 20132280-20132280. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2013.2280  

  • April 8, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,025 views

Why Do Males And Females Look Different?

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

You see a spotted hyena – is it a male or female. There’s no way of telling without a blood test or a litter of pups. Other animals have obvious differences between males and females; eclectus parrots have green males but red and blue females, while male elephant seals weigh 10x as much as females. Are the differences for sexual selection or natural selection?... Read more »

Cunha, G., Risbridger, G., Wang, H., Place, N., Grumbach, M., Cunha, T., Weldele, M., Conley, A., Barcellos, D., Agarwal, S.... (2014) Development of the external genitalia: Perspectives from the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta). Differentiation, 87(1-2), 4-22. DOI: 10.1016/j.diff.2013.12.003  

Hammond, G., Miguel-Queralt, S., Yalcinkaya, T., Underhill, C., Place, N., Glickman, S., Drea, C., Wagner, A., & Siiteri, P. (2012) Phylogenetic Comparisons Implicate Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin in “Masculinization” of the Female Spotted Hyena . Endocrinology, 153(3), 1435-1443. DOI: 10.1210/en.2011-1837  

  • April 7, 2015
  • 10:35 AM
  • 927 views

Edwardsiella andrillae: The Icy Anemone

by beredim in Strange Animals



Edwardsiella andrillae


Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Cnidaria

Class: Anthozoa

Order: Actiniaria

Family: Edwardsiidae

Genus: Edwardsiella

Species: Edwardsiella andrillae


Meet Edwardsiella andrillae, a recently discovered species of sea anemone that lives anchored to the underside of sea ice offshore of Antarctica.



The species was discovered in December 2010 during a test run of an ... Read more »

  • April 4, 2015
  • 03:02 PM
  • 1,323 views

5 Weird Animals Described in 2014

by beredim in Strange Animals

From pink blind fish to mushroom shaped animals to flic-flac jumping spiders, here is a pick of the weirdest animals described in 2014.






1. Hoosier cavefish (Amblyopsis hoosieri)





A live specimen of A. hoosieri, measuring 6.07 cm (2.39 in) long.


The Hoosier cavefish (Amblyopsis hoosieri) is a subterranean blind fish from southern Indiana, U.S.

First discovered during a 2013 study on ... Read more »

  • April 1, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,146 views

The Bird Jaws Of Life

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Do birds have teeth? No, but they did once, and sometimes a throwback mutation can create a chick with a full set of chompers. That’s weird, but bird mouths get weirder. Birds can open their upper jaw, not just their lower. And some birds take being weird even farther. The crossbill has a mouth where the upper and lower beaks scissor past one another while the wrybill has a beak that always turns right. ... Read more »

Meredith, R., Zhang, G., Gilbert, M., Jarvis, E., & Springer, M. (2014) Evidence for a single loss of mineralized teeth in the common avian ancestor. Science, 346(6215), 1254390-1254390. DOI: 10.1126/science.1254390  

Smith, J., Sjoberg, S., Mueller, M., & Benkman, C. (2012) Assortative flocking in crossbills and implications for ecological speciation. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 279(1745), 4223-4229. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2012.1500  

Benkman, C., Parchman, T., & Mezquida, E. (2010) Patterns of coevolution in the adaptive radiation of crossbills. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1206(1), 1-16. DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2010.05702.x  

SNOWBERG, L., & BENKMAN, C. (2009) Mate choice based on a key ecological performance trait. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 22(4), 762-769. DOI: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2009.01699.x  

  • March 26, 2015
  • 07:50 AM
  • 1,021 views

Watching a paradigm shift in neuroscience

by Björn Brembs in bjoern.brembs.blog

When I finished my PhD 15 years ago, the neurosciences defined the main function of brains in terms of processing input to compute output: “brain function is ultimately best understood in terms of input/output transformations and how they are produced” […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...... Read more »

  • March 25, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,239 views

This Nose Knows

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Evolution has given the sperm whale the most amazing head in the animal kingdom. They’ve got the biggest brain – all 18 lb.s of it. It has 1900 liters of sperm oil that almost caused in the extinction of the animal. It has one nostril that’s offset on its head, making the whale asymmetric. But most impressively, he can change the density of his head to help him dive or surface, and to do it he uses the same organ he uses for echolocation!... Read more »

  • March 24, 2015
  • 03:08 PM
  • 1,017 views

The Rise of Evolutionary Biology Can Be Attributed To ... A Harry Potter Character?

by Jente Ottenburghs in Evolutionary Stories

The correspondence between Edgar Anderson and Ernst Mayr revealed a peculiar fact.... Read more »

  • March 23, 2015
  • 11:22 AM
  • 764 views

Convergent evolution of the genomes of marine mammals

by Amaury Avril in genome ecology evolution etc

Convergent evolution is defined by the independent evolution of similar traits in different lineages, in order to adapt to similar environmental conditions. Examples of this phenomenon include adaptations to altitude in humans, independent evolution of flight in birds and bats … Continue reading →... Read more »

Foote, A., Liu, Y., Thomas, G., Vinař, T., Alföldi, J., Deng, J., Dugan, S., van Elk, C., Hunter, M., Joshi, V.... (2015) Convergent evolution of the genomes of marine mammals. Nature Genetics, 47(3), 272-275. DOI: 10.1038/ng.3198  

  • March 20, 2015
  • 03:55 AM
  • 1,201 views

How chemistry affects the evolution of life

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: In this fascinating video, Professor Ros Rickaby from Oxford chats with Professor Simon Conway-Morris at Cambridge about how Earth’s changing chemistry has affected evolution, and how this can sometimes lead to evolutionary convergence... Read more »

  • March 18, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,210 views

The Search For The Unicorn - Slightly Off Center

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

One of the most amazing animals is one of the least often seen. It has one tooth that grows into a tusk that’s off center. The tusk is basically inside out, with the inside of the tooth exposed to the world. This animal also has the world’s only spiraled tooth, for strength and because that’s what keeps it growing straight. Finally, this animal spends an amazing amount of time on its back. Why do we care about these animal…..because they are so awesome!... Read more »

Christen AG, & Christen JA. (2011) The unicorn and the narwhal: a tale of the tooth. Journal of the history of dentistry, 59(3), 135-42. PMID: 22372187  

Kingsley, M., & Ramsay, M. (1988) The Spiral in the Tusk of the Narwhal. ARCTIC, 41(3). DOI: 10.14430/arctic1723  

Nweeia, M., Eichmiller, F., Hauschka, P., Donahue, G., Orr, J., Ferguson, S., Watt, C., Mead, J., Potter, C., Dietz, R.... (2014) Sensory ability in the narwhal tooth organ system. The Anatomical Record, 297(4), 599-617. DOI: 10.1002/ar.22886  

Dietz, R., Shapiro, A., Bakhtiari, M., Orr, J., Tyack, P., Richard, P., Eskesen, I., & Marshall, G. (2007) Upside-down swimming behaviour of free-ranging narwhals. BMC Ecology, 7(1), 14. DOI: 10.1186/1472-6785-7-14  

  • March 11, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 941 views

The Eyes Have It

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

The Cyclops had one eye in the middle of his forehead, but can you think of real animal with only one eye? Two eyes (or more) seem to be very important in evolution. This is so true that when flatfish lie down on the ocean floor they move one eye to the other side of their head! Research is showing that it’s more than just their eye that changes and the alterations are important for their survival. And by the way – there is one kind of animal that only has one eye, it’s the &he........ Read more »

  • March 8, 2015
  • 07:20 AM
  • 657 views

The genetics of monarch butterfly migration and warning colouration

by Lucas Marques Da Cunha in genome ecology evolution etc

The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) has a large distribution worldwide. It occurs in North, Central, and South America, Caribbean, and it has recently dispersed to other locations, such as Oceania and Africa. Two traits of this butterfly are incredibly intriguing: … Continue reading →... Read more »

Zhan, S., Zhang, W., Niitepõld, K., Hsu, J., Haeger, J., Zalucki, M., Altizer, S., de Roode, J., Reppert, S., & Kronforst, M. (2014) The genetics of monarch butterfly migration and warning colouration. Nature, 514(7522), 317-321. DOI: 10.1038/nature13812  

  • March 4, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 742 views

Looking Sideways In The Mirror

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Not every animal that’s bilaterally symmetric chooses to stay that way. Some parasitic worms must become asymmetric in order to attach to fish gills, and some fish have mouths that turn to the right or left for lepidophagy. What’s lepidophagy you ask? They rip off and eat the scales of other fish!... Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 828 views

Mirroring Evolution

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Heads and symmetric bodies didn’t necessarily evolve at the same time, but we don’t know which was first. Some animals have heads and bilateral bodies, and some have radial bodies and no heads. Are there any in between? Yes, and no, but why would any group of animals lose heads after they had evolved them?... Read more »

  • February 24, 2015
  • 03:11 AM
  • 926 views

Shelf Life: the Olinguito’s Skull

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Instead of travelling to remote locations in faraway countries, scientists sometimes discover a new species by looking a little more closely at an old specimen in a museum drawer.... Read more »

  • February 18, 2015
  • 07:30 AM
  • 906 views

Space - It'll Mess You Up

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Extended spaceflight can wreak havoc on your body – your bones, muscles, brain and vestibular system all pay the price for exploration. And while your body might adapt to space, big problems can occur when you return to Earth gravity. You go into space as a virile astronaut, but return as fragile as a your great grandmother. ... Read more »

Finetti, F., Paccani, S., Rosenbaum, J., & Baldari, C. (2011) Intraflagellar transport: a new player at the immune synapse. Trends in Immunology, 32(4), 139-145. DOI: 10.1016/j.it.2011.02.001  

Troshichev, O., Gorshkov, E., Shapovalov, S., Sokolovskii, V., Ivanov, V., & Vorobeitchikov, V. (2004) Variations of the gravitational field as a motive power for rhythmics of biochemical processes. Advances in Space Research, 34(7), 1619-1624. DOI: 10.1016/j.asr.2004.02.013  

Fitts, R., Trappe, S., Costill, D., Gallagher, P., Creer, A., Colloton, P., Peters, J., Romatowski, J., Bain, J., & Riley, D. (2010) Prolonged space flight-induced alterations in the structure and function of human skeletal muscle fibres. The Journal of Physiology, 588(18), 3567-3592. DOI: 10.1113/jphysiol.2010.188508  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SRI Technology.

To learn more, visit http://selfregulationinstitute.org/.