Post List

  • July 24, 2014
  • 11:45 AM
  • 7 views

July 24, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

How many times can you say the word “gonad” in a sentence without giggling? If the answer is one, then I congratulate you on turning thirteen. If the answer is many, then you must be a biologist. Biologists appreciate the value of a good gonad, and so should you. The gonad of the worm C. elegans serves as an important model in which to study tissue organization and development, as you’ll see in the paper that accompanies today’s image. At the end of cell division, cytokinesis typical........ Read more »

Amini, R., Goupil, E., Labella, S., Zetka, M., Maddox, A., Labbe, J., & Chartier, N. (2014) C. elegans Anillin proteins regulate intercellular bridge stability and germline syncytial organization. originally published in the Journal of Cell Biology, 206(1), 129-143. DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201310117  

  • July 24, 2014
  • 04:14 AM
  • 46 views

Prenatal valproate exposure and brains

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Amanda Wood and colleagues [1] (open-access) makes a potentially very important contribution to the growing literature looking at how prenatal exposure to sodium valproate (VPA) may affect some children. Authors reported on: "regional structural cortical brain changes in humans exposed to VPA in utero" and specifically, increased cortical thickness in the left inferior frontal gyrus.Lightning and lava @ Oliver Spalt @ Wikipedia In case you need any background on the s........ Read more »

Wood, A., Chen, J., Barton, S., Nadebaum, C., Anderson, V., Catroppa, C., Reutens, D., O'Brien, T., & Vajda, F. (2014) Altered cortical thickness following prenatal sodium valproate exposure. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology. DOI: 10.1002/acn3.74  

  • July 23, 2014
  • 05:51 PM
  • 78 views

Lanthanum-Based Perovskite Materials to Improve Fuel Cells

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Scientists at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) have studied the effects of using lanthanum-based perovskite ceramic contact materials in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs).... Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 05:05 PM
  • 80 views

Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV), ER stress, and Apoptosis

by thelonevirologist in Virology Tidbits

Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) is a causative agent of acute encephalitis in humans, and being an arthropod borne virus transmitted predominately by mosquitoes ( that primarily target domestic animals and humans, with an estimated mortality of up to 70000 deaths reported per annum. Upon infection the viral proteins localise to the ER where they induce the ER stress which eventually induces Caspase dependent apoptosis.
... Read more »

Unni SK, Růžek D, Chhatbar C, Mishra R, Johri MK, & Singh SK. (2011) Japanese encephalitis virus: from genome to infectome. Microbes and infection / Institut Pasteur, 13(4), 312-21. PMID: 21238600  

Cui J, Counor D, Shen D, Sun G, He H, Deubel V, & Zhang S. (2008) Detection of Japanese encephalitis virus antibodies in bats in Southern China. The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene, 78(6), 1007-11. PMID: 18541785  

Mori Y, Okabayashi T, Yamashita T, Zhao Z, Wakita T, Yasui K, Hasebe F, Tadano M, Konishi E, Moriishi K.... (2005) Nuclear localization of Japanese encephalitis virus core protein enhances viral replication. Journal of virology, 79(6), 3448-58. PMID: 15731239  

Uchil PD, Kumar AV, & Satchidanandam V. (2006) Nuclear localization of flavivirus RNA synthesis in infected cells. Journal of virology, 80(11), 5451-64. PMID: 16699025  

Ghosh Roy S, Sadigh B, Datan E, Lockshin RA, & Zakeri Z. (2014) Regulation of cell survival and death during Flavivirus infections. World journal of biological chemistry, 5(2), 93-105. PMID: 24921001  

Lu, M., Lawrence, D., Marsters, S., Acosta-Alvear, D., Kimmig, P., Mendez, A., Paton, A., Paton, J., Walter, P., & Ashkenazi, A. (2014) Opposing unfolded-protein-response signals converge on death receptor 5 to control apoptosis. Science, 345(6192), 98-101. DOI: 10.1126/science.1254312  

Han J, Back SH, Hur J, Lin YH, Gildersleeve R, Shan J, Yuan CL, Krokowski D, Wang S, Hatzoglou M.... (2013) ER-stress-induced transcriptional regulation increases protein synthesis leading to cell death. Nature cell biology, 15(5), 481-90. PMID: 23624402  

  • July 23, 2014
  • 03:43 PM
  • 74 views

Physicians face difficult choices when treating patients with bipolar and obsessive compulsive disorders

by Valerie Ashton in The Molecular Scribe

New research suggests patients with both bipolar disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder should receive treatments for bipolar disorder alone. Bipolar and obsessive compulsive disorder therapies taken together can cause worsening of disease symptoms, making it difficult for physicians to treat both conditions. This is a concern as over 1 in 5 patients with bipolar disorder develop obsessive compulsive disorder during their lifetime.... Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 01:21 PM
  • 79 views

Voyager has hit interstellar space…. maybe?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Poor Voyager, he just can’t catch a break. We’ve said it’s hit interstellar space more times than we want to admit and in 2012, the Voyager mission team announced that […]... Read more »

G. Gloeckler, & L. A. Fisk. (2014) A test for whether or not Voyager 1 has crossed the heliopause. Geophysical Research Letters. info:/10.1002/2014GL060781

  • July 23, 2014
  • 01:13 PM
  • 78 views

Preregistration for All Medical Animal Research

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Writing in the European Journal of Clinical Investigation, three Dutch researchers say that All preclinical trials should be registered in advance in an online registry Citing the fact that all clinical trials are (in theory) already registered, authors Jansen of Lorkeers et al say that the system should be extended to cover preclinical medical research, […]The post Preregistration for All Medical Animal Research appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Jansen of Lorkeers, S., Doevendans, P., & Chamuleau, S. (2014) All preclinical trials should be registered in advance in an online registry. European Journal of Clinical Investigation. DOI: 10.1111/eci.12299  

  • July 23, 2014
  • 12:46 PM
  • 86 views

As a butterfly flaps its wings in Tokyo, a neuron in your head veers slightly heavenward…

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

When you look at the edge of a table, there is a neuron in your head that goes from silence to pop pop pop. As you extend your arm, a nerve commanding the muscle does the same thing. Your retina has neurons whose firing rate goes up or down depending on whether it detects a light spot […]... Read more »

Churchland, M., Cunningham, J., Kaufman, M., Foster, J., Nuyujukian, P., Ryu, S., & Shenoy, K. (2012) Neural population dynamics during reaching. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature11129  

Shenoy KV, Sahani M, & Churchland MM. (2013) Cortical control of arm movements: a dynamical systems perspective. Annual review of neuroscience, 337-59. PMID: 23725001  

  • July 23, 2014
  • 11:54 AM
  • 79 views

The Adolescent Dog: One Last Chance?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

A synthesis of the latest research on social influences on development suggests adolescence is an important time for mammals – including dogs.Photo: dezi / ShutterstockMost people are familiar with the idea of a sensitive period for puppies that ends around 12 or 14 weeks. Is it possible that adolescence is also an important period for brain development and future behaviour?Social experience plays an important role in shaping animal behaviour throughout development according to Sachser et al (........ Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 10:22 AM
  • 39 views

What the textbooks don't tell you - one of psychology's most famous experiments was seriously flawed

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

Zimbardo speaking in '09Conducted in 1971, the Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE) has acquired a mythical status and provided the inspiration for at least two feature-length films. You'll recall that several university students allocated to the role of jailor turned brutal and the study had to be aborted prematurely. Philip Zimbardo, the experiment's lead investigator, says the lesson from the research is that in certain situations, good people readily turn bad. "If you put good apples into a bad ........ Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 09:38 AM
  • 22 views

Video Tip of the Week: Nowomics, set up alert feeds for new data

by Mary in OpenHelix

Yeah, I know you know. There’s a lot of genomics and proteomics data coming out every day–some of it in the traditional publication route, but some of it isn’t–and it’s only getting harder and harder to wrangle the useful information to access the signal from the noise.  I can remember when merely looking through the […]... Read more »

Acland A., T. Barrett, J. Beck, D. A. Benson, C. Bollin, E. Bolton, S. H. Bryant, K. Canese, D. M. Church, & K. Clark. (2014) Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Nucleic Acids Research, 42(D1). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkt1146  

  • July 23, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 19 views

Let's Get Loud

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Loud noises are common in nature. New research is giving clues as to how and why animals make such noise. A new study investigates the reasons that howler monkeys howl. Protection and marking territory are main reasons, including for protection of infants or feeding areas.

A slightly older study notes that blue whale song has become lower in pitch since the whaling ban. The authors suggest that the reason for this may be that males don’t have to sing as loud (higher frequencies are loud........ Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 07:01 AM
  • 41 views

Seeing Red: A New Way To Predict Preeclampsia

by Rebekah Morrow in United Academics

New Congo red test predicts development of preeclampsia with pregnant women. A large collaboration of scientists recently reported a new method of determining which women would develop preeclampsia. Urine samples were collected from more than 600 patients and mixed with a dye called Congo red. Congo red stains large clumps of proteins, but doesn’t mark smaller separate proteins.... Read more »

Buhimschi IA, Nayeri UA, Zhao G, Shook LL, Pensalfini A, Funai EF, Bernstein IM, Glabe CG, & Buhimschi CS. (2014) Protein misfolding, congophilia, oligomerization, and defective amyloid processing in preeclampsia. Science translational medicine, 6(245). PMID: 25031267  

Whitehead, N. (2014) Proteins and a pregnancy woe. Science, 345(6194), 249-249. DOI: 10.1126/science.345.6194.249  

  • July 23, 2014
  • 06:57 AM
  • 78 views

Top-of-atmosphere contribution to unforced variability in global temperature

by Ed Hawkins in Climate Lab Book

As the attention received by the ‘global warming hiatus’ demonstrates, global mean surface temperature (T) variability on decadal timescales is of great interest to both the general public and to scientists. Here, I will discuss a recently published paper (Brown … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 05:00 AM
  • 52 views

Might you like a water mite named after you?

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

In light of the new water mite named after pop star Jennifer Lopez, we take a funny look at other critters named after celebrities.... Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 03:46 AM
  • 56 views

Trauma and PTSD raise risk of autoimmune disorders?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I admit to some head scratching when I first read the paper by Aoife O’Donovan and colleagues [1] reporting that among war veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan campaigns, "trauma exposure and PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder] may increase risk of autoimmune disorders".It wasn't that I didn't believe the results, but rather that the idea that a physical event with a psychological consequence could impact on a somatic condition with an autoimmune element to it seemed to open u........ Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 30 views

Despite the Hype: Many Former NFL Athletes May Have Normal Neurological Function and Structure

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Neuropsychological impairments were found in some retired NFL players; however, the majority of retired NFL players had no clinical signs of chronic brain damage. Some retired players had lesions found on brain imaging tests and these were associated with the number of previous concussions.... Read more »

  • July 22, 2014
  • 11:20 PM
  • 35 views

Heroes and Villains: Banal or Special People? Part 2 of 2

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

According to Zimbardo and colleagues, both heroic acts and evil acts occur primarily in response to situational factors, rather than internal features of the person. However, on closer inspection, the situationist analysis provides inconsistent accounts of how each of these occurs. Evil actions are attributed to factors entirely outside the person, while heroism relies on the person’s inner qualities.... Read more »

  • July 22, 2014
  • 06:47 PM
  • 44 views

When Crazy becomes a Crime

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

My friend has a glass eye, you would never notice and unless you knew the story you might not think anything of it. His older brother did it. Yes, you […]... Read more »

Dana Goldman,, John Fastenau,, Riad Dirani,, Eric Hellend,, Geoff Joyce,, Ryan Conrad,, & Darius Lakdawalla,. (2014) Medicaid Prior Authorization Policies and Imprisonment Among Patients With Schizophrenia. The American Journal of Managed Care, 20(7). info:/2014;20(7):577-586

  • July 22, 2014
  • 03:38 PM
  • 27 views

Cheaper Platinum-Yttrium Fuel Cell Catalyst Developed

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Researchers at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) report that they have developed a platinum-yttrium fuel cell catalyst which is stable, more active and less expensive than the existing platinum catalysts.... Read more »

Patricia Hernandez-Fernandez, Federico Masini, David N. McCarthy, Christian E. Strebel, Daniel Friebel, Davide Deiana, Paolo Malacrida, Anders Nierhoff, Anders Bodin, Anna M. Wise, Jane H. Nielsen, Thomas W. Hansen, Anders Nilsson, Ifan E. L. . (2014) Mass-selected nanoparticles of PtxY as model catalysts for ​oxygen electroreduction. Nature Chemistry. info:/10.1038/nchem.2001

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