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  • November 29, 2015
  • 11:45 PM

Diversity and persistence of group tags under replicator dynamics

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Everyday I walk to the Stabile Research Building to drink espresso and sit in my cozy — although oversaturated with screens — office. Oh, and to chat about research with great people like Arturo Araujo, David Basanta, Jill Gallaher, Jacob Scott, Robert Vander Velde and other Moffitters. This walk to the office takes about 30 […]... Read more »

Jansson, F. (2015) What games support the evolution of an ingroup bias?. Journal of theoretical biology, 100-10. PMID: 25794651  

  • November 25, 2015
  • 03:45 AM

From linear to nonlinear payoffs in the double public goods game

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

If you recall, dear reader, around this time last year, Robert Vander Velde, David Basanta, Jacob Scott and I got excited about the Archetti (2013,2014) approach to modeling non-linear public goods in cancer. We’ve been working on this intermittently for the last year, but aim to focus now that I have settled in here at […]... Read more »

  • November 19, 2015
  • 08:30 PM

Cytokine storms during CAR T-cell therapy for lymphoblastic leukemia

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

For most of the last 70 years or so, treating cancer meant one of three things: surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. In most cases, some combination of these remains the standard of care. But cancer research does not stand still. More recent developments have included a focus on immunotherapy: using, modifying, or augmenting the patient’s natural […]... Read more »

  • November 15, 2015
  • 04:00 PM

Some Notes on Reductionism

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

We can and should (and do) avoid the idea that stringing together "nothing but" pieces of content is sufficient to make 'holistic' understanding bubble up as an emergent property of student learning. But equally dubious, and equally unsubscribed, is the idea that learning can be transformed from fragmented to holistic by subtracting something from the experience.... Read more »

  • November 6, 2015
  • 05:30 PM

Concept Before Procedure? It Doesn't Matter

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Overall, both longitudinal and experimental studies indicate that procedural knowledge leads to improvements in conceptual knowledge, in addition to vice versa. The relations between the two types of knowledge are bidirectional. It is a myth that it is a "one-way street" from conceptual knowledge to procedural knowledge.... Read more »

  • October 23, 2015
  • 12:53 PM

Finding the Highways for Migrating Birds

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

When birds set out for a long journey, they don't need roads and they certainly don't need road maps. They learn the route from others or intuit it from their DNA, an urge to point their bodies one way at a certain time of year and stop flying a few thousand miles later. To understand these journeys better, researchers mapped the most efficient routes through the world's winds. The highways that emerged weren't the shortest paths—but they did strikingly match the behavior of real bird........ Read more »

Kranstauber B, Weinzierl R, Wikelski M, & Safi K. (2015) Global aerial flyways allow efficient travelling. Ecology letters. PMID: 26477348  

  • September 29, 2015
  • 01:40 PM

How Sheep Are like an Avalanche

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

Sheep are rarely dangerous to skiers, but otherwise they have a lot in common with avalanches. That's what physicists say after mathematically modeling the ungulates' behavior (and staying well out of their path).

Francesco Ginelli, who researches complex systems at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland, had already studied flocks of birds and schools of fish. But he was curious to learn what was different about the movement of sheep or other grazers. Animals like these have a simple goa... Read more »

Ginelli, F., Peruani, F., Pillot, M., Chaté, H., Theraulaz, G., & Bon, R. (2015) Intermittent collective dynamics emerge from conflicting imperatives in sheep herds. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201503749. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1503749112  

  • September 13, 2015
  • 03:15 PM

Concept Mapping vs. Retrieval Practice

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Although some relevant differences were not significant in this study, the effects reported in the previous studies, along with the time differentials in the conditions leads one to believe that, all other things being equal, retrieval practice is likely superior to concept mapping for learning (from texts).... Read more »

  • September 5, 2015
  • 06:26 PM


by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Can we please talk about how we keep kids trapped for too long in counting number land? I've got this marvelous study to show you which might provides some good reasons to interleave different number systems throughout students' educations. It's this one.... Read more »

  • September 5, 2015
  • 06:21 AM

Are internal replications the solution to the replication crisis in Psychology? No.

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Most Psychology findings are not replicable. What can be done? Stanford psychologist Michael Frank has an idea : Cumulative study sets with internal replication. ‘If I had to advocate for a single change to practice, this would be it.’ I took a look whether this makes any difference. A recent paper in the journal Science […]... Read more »

  • September 3, 2015
  • 06:23 AM

Why are Psychological findings mostly unreplicable?

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Take 97 psychological effects from top journals which are claimed to be robust. How many will replicate? Brian Nosek and his huge team tried it out and the results were sobering, to say the least. How did we get here? The data give some clues. Sometimes the title of a paper just sounds incredible. Estimating […]... Read more »

  • August 25, 2015
  • 10:30 AM

We Can Do Persistence

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Integrating "new math knowledge with previous knowledge and experience" is not as interwoven with students' intrinsic personal/emotional qualities as we like to think. It may not matter that they have low or high self-esteem or that they fear or do not fear mathematics or that they have or do not have test anxiety or that they like to challenge themselves or not.... Read more »

Malmivuori, M. (2006) Affect and Self-Regulation. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 63(2), 149-164. DOI: 10.1007/s10649-006-9022-8  

  • August 23, 2015
  • 08:00 PM

Are You Smarter Than a Belgian 8th Grader?

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

A central point of this paper is something close to my heart—the notion that how one represents a certain piece of mathematics knowledge is often dramatically important. For this research in particular, the authors looked at fraction knowledge across three different countries: the U.S., Belgium, and China. ... Read more »

  • July 21, 2015
  • 03:43 PM

Drawing a line between quantum and classical world

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Quantum theory is one of the great achievements of 20th century science, yet physicists have struggled to find a clear boundary between our everyday world and what Albert Einstein called the “spooky” features of the quantum world, including cats that could be both alive and dead, and photons that can communicate with each other across space instantaneously.... Read more »

  • July 14, 2015
  • 06:09 AM

Laughing Hyenas Have Social Network Too

by jeffrey daniels in United Academics

Hyenas, like humans, are social animals. It turns out that a hyena, as is usually the case with humans, won’t befriend all the members in their clan. Extensive research reveals their social network strategies... Read more »

  • July 6, 2015
  • 08:29 AM

Scientists Predict A Talking Elephant, Szilamandee

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A talking white elephant called Slizamandee could save the world with his wisdom and "teach us with the deepest voice of history", according to an academic paper published today.

The article appeared in the journal Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology. The authors are led by Otto E. Rössler, a biochemist. It's called Is it Ethical to heal a young white Elephant from his physiological Autism? Many thanks to Michelle Dawson for bringing it to my attention.

Rössler et al. start ou... Read more »

Rossler, O., Theis, C., Heiter, J., Fleischer, W., & Student, A. (2015) Is it Ethical to heal a young white Elephant from his physiological Autism?. Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology. DOI: 10.1016/j.pbiomolbio.2015.06.020  

  • July 2, 2015
  • 12:57 PM

Freezing single atoms to absolute zero with microwaves brings quantum technology closer

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Physicists at the University of Sussex have found a way of using everyday technology found in kitchen microwaves and mobile telephones to bring quantum physics closer to helping solve enormous scientific problems that the most powerful of today’s supercomputers cannot even begin to embark upon.... Read more »

Weidt, S., Randall, J., Webster, S., Standing, E., Rodriguez, A., Webb, A., Lekitsch, B., & Hensinger, W. (2015) Ground-State Cooling of a Trapped Ion Using Long-Wavelength Radiation. Physical Review Letters, 115(1). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.013002  

  • May 23, 2015
  • 10:04 PM

Combining drugs with different penetration profiles can accelerate development of multidrug resistance

by Betty Zou in Eat, Read, Science

One strategy to prevent multidrug resistance from developing is combination therapy, when two or more drugs with unique modes of action are taken together to treat an infection. In a paper published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team of mathematicians and biologists led by Dr. Pleuni Pennings at San Francisco State University examined how differences in drug penetrance can impact the effectiveness of combination therapy and subsequent emergence of multidrug ........ Read more »

Moreno-Gamez, S., Hill, A., Rosenbloom, D., Petrov, D., Nowak, M., & Pennings, P. (2015) Imperfect drug penetration leads to spatial monotherapy and rapid evolution of multidrug resistance. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201424184. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1424184112  

  • May 2, 2015
  • 10:00 PM

Intuition and Domain Knowledge

by Joshua Fisher in School of Doubt

While knowledge and process are both important, knowledge is more important. Even though each of the tasks in this experiment was more “intuitive” (non-decomposable) than analytical in nature, and even when the approach taken to the task was “intuitive,” knowledge trumped process. Process had no significant effect by itself. Knowing stuff is good.... Read more »

  • April 21, 2015
  • 04:17 PM

These Adorable Rodents Are Democratic Snugglers

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

If you're a small animal in a cold environment, being standoffish is a bad survival strategy. That's why animals of many kinds huddle for warmth. They put their furred or feathered bodies right up against their neighbors' and conserve energy that they would otherwise spend heating themselves.

One especially adorable huddler is the degu (Octodon degus), a rodent that lives in Chile and has a tail like a paintbrush. As temperatures drop, degus clump into cuddling groups to keep warm. A new ... Read more »

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